PVR Hard disk content available on network? - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 10 Old 06-02-2006, 09:49 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Justafarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Hello all. Did a brief search and couldn't find any discussion on this so apologies in advance if it's been covered elsewhere (and could someone please suggest a link if it has).

I have a Panasonic DMR EH60 (DVD and Hard disk recorder). Problem is I end up recording a large amount of stuff which I want to watch and can't get to the main TV as other family members want to watch their stuff. So I would like to hook into a LAN network and watch this elsewhere - say, computer screen in Study or perhaps second TV in kitchen.

Any suggestions how to set this up? Perhaps a network Hard disk drive, but does this model enable direct hookup to PC network (don't really want to burn DVDs for single watch programs).

Please help as I'm losing sleep watching my stuff when everyone's gone to bed!
Justafarmer is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 10 Old 06-03-2006, 05:15 PM
AVS Special Member
 
rm -rf *.*'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Uberglitch, Switzerland
Posts: 3,152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
You're a very funny guy. You know that? Ever thought about taking the routine on the road? Networking a DVR that doesn't have a network connector. HAHAHAHHAHAHAA. Stop it, please, you're killing me. HAHAHHAAHAHHA

Still no news from New Zealand.
If we ever get any, we'll be sure to let you know.
rm -rf *.* is offline  
post #3 of 10 Old 06-04-2006, 06:37 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
Justafarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
OK. Silly question, but you have to walk before you run.

Anyway, you have answered the question - I need to look for a DVR with a network connection.

Any suggestions out there?
Justafarmer is offline  
post #4 of 10 Old 06-04-2006, 09:17 AM
AVS Special Member
 
rm -rf *.*'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Uberglitch, Switzerland
Posts: 3,152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
So far, hands down, the best units out there, for in-house video sharing/streaming are the ReplayTV's. Any ReplayTV which has an ethernet port can can stream in realtime to other networked ReplayTV units of similar series (4xxx to other 4xxxx, and 5xxx to other 5xxx). Simply plug the RTV into your network and configure it and you're set. It's that simple - no hacking necessary since the company designed this feature into the OS. There is also software for ReplayTV that runs on your PC (or Mac or Linux box or any other os that can handle java) which allows you offload shows to your computer and then share them back to the networked units as if the computer was just another RTV on your network. www.dvarchive.org - check it out. There is a software pckage that allows you to use a Hauppauge Media MVP as a replayTV thin-client. There is also a software package for the x-box that allows the same (XBMC, I believe, I'm not an x-box owner, so I'm not sure). The down side to the ReplayTV is that the hardware based units are out of production and getting scarce - they are available on ebay and sometimes some of the other AVS members will put one up for sale in the ReplayTV forums.

Tivo can also stream from unit to unit, but it's not in realtime. It's a BS solution that requirres you to buffer like 15 minutes of the show to the recieving unit before playing back the show. Then, if you catch up to the end of the buffer, you get to take an intermission... Additionally, you still have to buy the network interface for the DVR and might have to hack the software to activate it. The fact that you can't get a lifetime subscription for a Tivo anymore (unless you buy a used unit that has one) and would have to pay monthly is yet another reason to steer clear of Tivo and their DRM'd POSes.

Still no news from New Zealand.
If we ever get any, we'll be sure to let you know.
rm -rf *.* is offline  
post #5 of 10 Old 06-13-2006, 09:35 PM
Advanced Member
 
FarmBubba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 535
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Dish network makes one that you can record shows and play the shows on 2 tv's at the same time, it pipes it to the other TV through the coax in your house.
You could also simply buy a second PVR for the other room and record show on both PVR's so you could watch them in either room.
FarmBubba is offline  
post #6 of 10 Old 06-14-2006, 10:29 AM
Senior Member
 
dotheDVDeed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 276
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Remember the good old days when you just ejected that VHS tape and walked it to the bedroom and continued watching it. Of course the MPAA and their DRM scroowed that.

I get all misty eyed thinking about it.... or maybe that's my eyes watering because the pictures so bad! :D

TIM
dotheDVDeed is offline  
post #7 of 10 Old 06-15-2006, 12:33 AM
Member
 
megazone's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: .worcester.ma.us
Posts: 38
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by rm -rf *.*
Tivo can also stream from unit to unit, but it's not in realtime. It's a BS solution that requirres you to buffer like 15 minutes of the show to the recieving unit before playing back the show. Then, if you catch up to the end of the buffer, you get to take an intermission... Additionally, you still have to buy the network interface for the DVR and might have to hack the software to activate it. The fact that you can't get a lifetime subscription for a Tivo anymore (unless you buy a used unit that has one) and would have to pay monthly is yet another reason to steer clear of Tivo and their DRM'd POSes.
Except this is ********.

1. Transfer speeds will depend on your network, but, for example, the current S2DT can transfer at 4x realtime for highest quality over Ethernet. So 15 minutes to transfer an hour show. And lower quality levels are faster since there are fewer bits-per-minute to transfer. Older units can transfer in better than realtime over most networks too, some faster than others. You can watch MRV (TiVo calls it Multi-Room Viewing) transfers *immediately*, no waiting for any buffer. I do it regularly over 802.11g, and it will continue to transfer ahead of your watching.

2. The S2DT has a built-in 10/100baseT Ethernet port, just like the ReplayTV 4k/5k. (And the S2DT has something no RTV has - dual-tuners.) Other S2 units accept USB adapters for wired Ethernet. Oh, boo-hoo, you have to buy an adapter. I got one for $5. Even without looking around wired adapters are maybe $20 at retail. Unlike ReplayTV, TiVo also supports WiFi on the box via USB. So you can connect an 11g dongle to the TiVo and be off, and not need to use an external bridge. (ReplayTV promised WiFi support and never delivered it.) And there are no hacks to enable supported adapters, you plug it in and set it up in the config. That's all.

3. TiVo no longer offers lifetime, this is true. However there are options other than monthly payments. 1-, 2-, and 3-year prepaid plans are available, both for the bundle sales from Tivo.com and for service-only plans for units purchased at retail.

If you network the TiVo you can copy content to/from a PC. (Officially supported, ReplayTV does this with 3rd party software.) You can view photos stored on a PC. (ReplayTV requires dedicating drive space and copying them to the RTV.) You can listen to music stored on a PC. (RTV can't do this.)

But even more - you can listen to music from Live365.com. You can access Yahoo Photos, Music, and Weather. You can check movie listings and buy tickets from Fandango.com. You can access broadband content available through TiVoCast (this keeps expanding). You can use Home Media Engine applications such as Galleon which provide many additional features - such as downloading video podcasts and making them available via the TiVo, accessing local event schedules, even checking email. You can access online software such as http://www.Apps.tv/

DRM on TiVoToGo files is no big deal, programs such as DirectShow Dump will strip the DRM in seconds and you have RAW MPEG2 to do what you want. There are programs, such as TVHarmony.com, which will convert it for iPod, PSP, Treo, etc.

TiVo is delivering on the promise of a networked DVR in ways ReplayTV never did. RTV did it first, but they stopped and now they're gone. They promised 4k-5k interoperability, music playback, WiFi support, and more, but after DNNA bought RTV they cancelled all of those projects - and, really, all further evolution of the product. RTV was a great product, but what you see today is what you get forever - and it is what you got two years ago. TiVo keeps evolving, both hardware and software, with new features. And, if nothing else, there are a lot of hacks for TiVo to give it even more features. Since it is a Linux-based system it hs been much more hacker-friendly then RTV.

-MegaZone, Gizmo Lovers
megazone is offline  
post #8 of 10 Old 06-20-2006, 10:57 AM
Senior Member
 
dotheDVDeed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 276
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Congratulations, finally with the S2DT, Tivo catches up with the 5 year old ReplayTV.... or does it? :)

You fail to mention the S2DT can't record over-the-air --ONLY cable or satellite.
And to use the dual tuner capability one channel has to be on DIGITAL cable, the other on analog--NO other combination works.
And now of course NO more lifetime subscriptions either.

Sorry for MY situation (yours may differ) I'll stick with ReplayTV.

TIM
dotheDVDeed is offline  
post #9 of 10 Old 06-21-2006, 08:10 PM
Member
 
longtimewolf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 110
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
How about getting a recorded show from a SA8300 to my laptop? Or anyother device for that matter......
longtimewolf is offline  
post #10 of 10 Old 07-05-2006, 03:33 PM
Newbie
 
johnnykuz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I've been using a Pioneer HS810 Tivo S2 in my home network since I bought it 2 years ago. It has a dedicated digital cable box in front of it and a slingbox behind it. I'm able to stream live TV and recordings from the hard drive to any PC I want over my home network and internet.

Very slick. Eliminates the need for separate PC TV tuners and the like, plus...I am able to control the Tivo through the slingbox (including programming, system resets, etc) over the network and internet.

I'm hooked.....

johnnykuz
johnnykuz is offline  
Closed Thread Digital Recorders (PVRs) General

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off