LCD TV with normal digital box and normal DVD recorder - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 24 Old 11-04-2008, 11:57 AM - Thread Starter
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Hi all, i'm thinking of getting an LCD TV. At the moment I have a 4:3 CRT TV, a regular digital box (non HD) from my cable company (Rogers) and a regular DVD Recorder (non-HD) made by Pioneer. its the DVR543HS i think. If i were to get this LCD TV, how would it interact with my current equipment? more specifically:

1. would i have to replace my non-HD digital box with an HD box?
2. would i have to replace my non-HD dvd recorder with an HD version?
3. can i record wide screen shows with my non-HD recorder?
4. can i record non wide screen shows on my non-HD recorder?
5. are there any other problems or things I need to worry about if i get this LCD tv
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post #2 of 24 Old 11-04-2008, 12:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by velocci View Post

Hi all, i'm thinking of getting an LCD TV. At the moment I have a 4:3 CRT TV, a regular digital box (non HD) from my cable company (Rogers) and a regular DVD Recorder (non-HD) made by Pioneer. its the DVR543HS i think. If i were to get this LCD TV, how would it interact with my current equipment? more specifically:

1. would i have to replace my non-HD digital box with an HD box? Yes, if you want HD quality, you need an HD set-top box.
2. would i have to replace my non-HD dvd recorder with an HD version? No.
3. can i record wide screen shows with my non-HD recorder? Yes, but your HD set-top box will output the material as Standard Definition 480i.
4. can i record non wide screen shows on my non-HD recorder? Yes.
5. are there any other problems or things I need to worry about if i get this LCD tv

No, you will experience viewing pleasure like never before.
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post #3 of 24 Old 11-04-2008, 12:32 PM - Thread Starter
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seriously, what happens if i get this TV and get an HD digital box and record a wide screen show onto my non-HD recorder? what happens when i play it back? would the tv need certain settings to be able to do this?

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Originally Posted by trex4757 View Post

No, you will experience viewing pleasure like never before.

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post #4 of 24 Old 11-04-2008, 01:04 PM
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Living in the USA, I can only give you an impression of similar transitions here. I'm not sure if the issues would be the same in the UK (Rogers is UK, am I correct? If you live in Canada, your experience would match USA):

1. would i have to replace my non-HD digital box with an HD box? In the USA, absolutely yes. Large LCD displays make standard-def sources look like muck.

2. would i have to replace my non-HD dvd recorder with an HD version? There currently aren't any HD recorders that can make optical discs for the USA market, and I hear they're only just now appearing for Europe and Australia. Depending on how clear your source is, recordings made on your "ordinary" DVD recorder will range from acceptable to pretty bad when shown on a large LCD display. (Again, experience using USA hardware.) For timeshifting, a Rogers HD decoder box with built-in HD recorder (if available) would be the most economical option short term: the new HD BluRay recorders are quite expensive as is the blank media.

3. can i record wide screen shows with my non-HD recorder? It depends on the recorder. Some record the flag that sets the auto-widescreen option, some don't. Read your manual closely: this information is usually buried in gibberish and you have to really look for it. The default for most non-HD recorders is the 4:3 format, widescreen material is letterboxed within the 4:3 frame and will be additionally window-boxed at the sides when displayed on an LCD television: not pretty.

4. can i record non wide screen shows on my non-HD recorder? Yes, this will work just as before. When these recordings are played on your widescreen LCD panel, they will be centered with black borders on the left and right sides. Alternatively you can crop or distort the image to fit the full LCD area, this can look passable or terrible depending on the original program source.

5. are there any other problems or things I need to worry about if i get this LCD tv? Nothing significant beyond the questions you've already posed. My advice to everyone who buys a new large LCD panel is, don't discard your old CRT if you can possibly afford the space in your home to keep it. Standard-def home-recorded material like DVD-R is *much* more watchable and enjoyable on CRT televisions than LCD panels: LCD is far less forgiving of standard-def flaws.
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post #5 of 24 Old 11-04-2008, 01:18 PM - Thread Starter
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actually, i live in Toronto, Ontario and use Rogers cable.

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Originally Posted by CitiBear View Post

Living in the USA, I can only give you an impression of similar transitions here. I'm not sure if the issues would be the same in the UK (Rogers is UK, am I correct? If you live in Canada, your experience would match USA):

1. would i have to replace my non-HD digital box with an HD box? In the USA, absolutely yes. Large LCD displays make standard-def sources look like muck.

2. would i have to replace my non-HD dvd recorder with an HD version? There currently aren't any HD recorders that can make optical discs for the USA market, and I hear they're only just now appearing for Europe and Australia. Depending on how clear your source is, recordings made on your "ordinary" DVD recorder will range from acceptable to pretty bad when shown on a large LCD display. (Again, experience using USA hardware.) For timeshifting, a Rogers HD decoder box with built-in HD recorder (if available) would be the most economical option short term: the new HD BluRay recorders are quite expensive as is the blank media.

3. can i record wide screen shows with my non-HD recorder? It depends on the recorder. Some record the flag that sets the auto-widescreen option, some don't. Read your manual closely: this information is usually buried in gibberish and you have to really look for it. The default for most non-HD recorders is the 4:3 format, widescreen material is letterboxed within the 4:3 frame and will be additionally window-boxed at the sides when displayed on an LCD television: not pretty.

4. can i record non wide screen shows on my non-HD recorder? Yes, this will work just as before. When these recordings are played on your widescreen LCD panel, they will be centered with black borders on the left and right sides. Alternatively you can crop or distort the image to fit the full LCD area, this can look passable or terrible depending on the original program source.

5. are there any other problems or things I need to worry about if i get this LCD tv? Nothing significant beyond the questions you've already posed. My advice to everyone who buys a new large LCD panel is, don't discard your old CRT if you can possibly afford the space in your home to keep it. Standard-def home-recorded material like DVD-R is *much* more watchable and enjoyable on CRT televisions than LCD panels: LCD is far less forgiving of standard-def flaws.

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post #6 of 24 Old 11-04-2008, 01:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by velocci View Post

Hi all, i'm thinking of getting an LCD TV. At the moment I have a 4:3 CRT TV, a regular digital box (non HD) from my cable company (Rogers) and a regular DVD Recorder (non-HD) made by Pioneer. its the DVR543HS i think. If i were to get this LCD TV, how would it interact with my current equipment? more specifically:

1. would i have to replace my non-HD digital box with an HD box?
2. would i have to replace my non-HD dvd recorder with an HD version?
3. can i record wide screen shows with my non-HD recorder?
4. can i record non wide screen shows on my non-HD recorder?
5. are there any other problems or things I need to worry about if i get this LCD tv

1. Not unless you wanted to enjoy the benefit of the HD channels.
2. As Citibear said their are no HD DVDRs and actually the PQ of a properly setup regular DVDR is quite good.
3. Yes but most will not set the WS flag, which means any recorded WS material will look vertically stretched played back on a 4x3 TV.
4. Yes
5. If you want true HD I'd be inclined to go with the cable co's DVR. You can just tie your SD DVDR off your cable co's STB but if it doesn't output WS over S-video you'll get a letter boxed picture that won't look very good.
I guess to me this would be the biggest obstical. If your STB cannot output WS over S-video I wouldn't bother with the DVDR and I'd just go with the cable co's DVR.
For DVDRs if looking for a HDD model I'd try and find a closeout Panasonic EH-55 or a new Pioneer. If you don't want the HDD then maybe a Panasonic. I think?? Canada still sells a ES series Panasonic. Otherwise the EZ series which tend to be a little more finicky.
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post #7 of 24 Old 11-04-2008, 02:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by velocci View Post

seriously, what happens if i get this TV and get an HD digital box and record a wide screen show onto my non-HD recorder? what happens when i play it back? would the tv need certain settings to be able to do this?

I have a Comcast HD-DVR connected to a Pioneer DVR-633H-S DVD Recorder, which is connected to my plasma TV via component cables. The DVD recorder upscales recorded material to 480p, so there are really no settings required to achieve a decent picture.
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post #8 of 24 Old 11-04-2008, 02:42 PM - Thread Starter
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what does PQ mean?

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Originally Posted by jjeff View Post

1. Not unless you wanted to enjoy the benefit of the HD channels.
2. As Citibear said their are no HD DVDRs and actually the PQ of a properly setup regular DVDR is quite good.
3. Yes but most will not set the WS flag, which means any recorded WS material will look vertically stretched played back on a 4x3 TV.
4. Yes
5. If you want true HD I'd be inclined to go with the cable co's DVR. You can just tie your SD DVDR off your cable co's STB but if it doesn't output WS over S-video you'll get a letter boxed picture that won't look very good.
I guess to me this would be the biggest obstical. If your STB cannot output WS over S-video I wouldn't bother with the DVDR and I'd just go with the cable co's DVR.
For DVDRs if looking for a HDD model I'd try and find a closeout Panasonic EH-55 or a new Pioneer. If you don't want the HDD then maybe a Panasonic. I think?? Canada still sells a ES series Panasonic. Otherwise the EZ series which tend to be a little more finicky.

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post #9 of 24 Old 11-04-2008, 02:53 PM - Thread Starter
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another thing i'm worried about is, if i were to get the HD digital box, all my usual channels will now be in the 100s or above instead of ranging from 2-40.
my DVD recorder only goes upto 125 i think. so i won't be able to record a high channel unless i record the signal comming from the HD digital box, which means i will have to be watching that channel to be recording it. that's no good. it seems to me that i'd have to get the HD digital box that has the built in recording capabilities. that means chucking my relatively new DVD recorder. plus i won't be able to copy recordings onto a DVD. that sucks to.
maybe i should not buy this LCD tv just yet. afterall, i was going to buy an older model on discount to keep me going untill our cable signals go totally HD in which case i'd go all out and buy top of the line brand new LCD TV. maybe i should just wait untill then? opinions?


Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff View Post

1. Not unless you wanted to enjoy the benefit of the HD channels.
2. As Citibear said their are no HD DVDRs and actually the PQ of a properly setup regular DVDR is quite good.
3. Yes but most will not set the WS flag, which means any recorded WS material will look vertically stretched played back on a 4x3 TV.
4. Yes
5. If you want true HD I'd be inclined to go with the cable co's DVR. You can just tie your SD DVDR off your cable co's STB but if it doesn't output WS over S-video you'll get a letter boxed picture that won't look very good.
I guess to me this would be the biggest obstical. If your STB cannot output WS over S-video I wouldn't bother with the DVDR and I'd just go with the cable co's DVR.
For DVDRs if looking for a HDD model I'd try and find a closeout Panasonic EH-55 or a new Pioneer. If you don't want the HDD then maybe a Panasonic. I think?? Canada still sells a ES series Panasonic. Otherwise the EZ series which tend to be a little more finicky.

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post #10 of 24 Old 11-04-2008, 03:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by velocci View Post

what does pq mean?

picture quality.
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post #11 of 24 Old 11-04-2008, 03:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by velocci View Post

another thing i'm worried about is, if i were to get the HD digital box, all my usual channels will now be in the 100s or above instead of ranging from 2-40.
my DVD recorder only goes upto 125 i think. so i won't be able to record a high channel unless i record the signal comming from the HD digital box, which means i will have to be watching that channel to be recording it. that's no good. it seems to me that i'd have to get the HD digital box that has the built in recording capabilities. that means chucking my relatively new DVD recorder. plus i won't be able to copy recordings onto a DVD. that sucks to.
maybe i should not buy this LCD tv just yet. afterall, i was going to buy an older model on discount to keep me going untill our cable signals go totally HD in which case i'd go all out and buy top of the line brand new LCD TV. maybe i should just wait untill then? opinions?

You should connect your cable box audio/video outputs to line 1 or line 2 inputs.
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post #12 of 24 Old 11-04-2008, 03:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by velocci View Post

another thing i'm worried about is, if i were to get the HD digital box, all my usual channels will now be in the 100s or above instead of ranging from 2-40.
my DVD recorder only goes upto 125 i think. so i won't be able to record a high channel unless i record the signal comming from the HD digital box, which means i will have to be watching that channel to be recording it. that's no good. it seems to me that i'd have to get the HD digital box that has the built in recording capabilities. that means chucking my relatively new DVD recorder. plus i won't be able to copy recordings onto a DVD. that sucks to.
maybe i should not buy this LCD tv just yet. afterall, i was going to buy an older model on discount to keep me going untill our cable signals go totally HD in which case i'd go all out and buy top of the line brand new LCD TV. maybe i should just wait untill then? opinions?

Yes to record the digital channels (high numbers) you will need to tune those on your STB and then record the output to your DVDR. Even DVDRs with the digital tuner usually only receive the local channels. The others are usually scrambled.
What other people with the digital DVR use their DVDR for is to burn to DVD for archiving. In this manner you don't need a DVDR with the tuner since everything is recorded from the line output of your STB.
It's up to you about the HDTV. Since your on cable your only HD channels without a HD box might just be the locals that your TV can tune in. They would be channels like 5.1, 20.22 etc. They won't show up on channel numbers like 200.
Note I'm going by what cable systems are like in the US, they could?? be different in Canada. If you know someone with a new digital TV hooked up directly to your cable system they would be able to tell you exactly what you can expect from your cable.
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post #13 of 24 Old 11-05-2008, 07:54 AM - Thread Starter
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yes, that's the way I have it now, but that means i have to watch whatever i'm recording, which usually defeats the purpose.

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Originally Posted by trex4757 View Post

You should connect your cable box audio/video outputs to line 1 or line 2 inputs.

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post #14 of 24 Old 11-05-2008, 10:02 AM
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People here hate when I point this out, but the price of the HDTV "revolution" is the loss of so-called "boxless" cable. Those of you who insist on not having a decoder box have been a thorn in the side of the cable industry for years, dragging down opportunities for them to push additional services like pay-per-view. Sooner or later, you're going to end up with a box if you want HD cable-supplied channels. Without a box, HD will very likely be limited to the ATSC OTA stations. The sleepy cable industry has been changing under our noses for quite awhile, and is now seizing every last inroad it can grab. The one-two punch of ATSC and HD is giving them their best decoder box leverage in decades. The days of "no-box, record one channel while watching the other using the recorder's cable-ready tuner" are drawing to a close. Start thinking today about the workarounds you'll need to use in the near future.
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post #15 of 24 Old 11-05-2008, 11:06 AM - Thread Starter
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for those who don't know to much about this stuff can you repeat that in english?

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Originally Posted by CitiBear View Post

People here hate when I point this out, but the price of the HDTV "revolution" is the loss of so-called "boxless" cable. Those of you who insist on not having a decoder box have been a thorn in the side of the cable industry for years, dragging down opportunities for them to push additional services like pay-per-view. Sooner or later, you're going to end up with a box if you want HD cable-supplied channels. Without a box, HD will very likely be limited to the ATSC OTA stations. The sleepy cable industry has been changing under our noses for quite awhile, and is now seizing every last inroad it can grab. The one-two punch of ATSC and HD is giving them their best decoder box leverage in decades. The days of "no-box, record one channel while watching the other using the recorder's cable-ready tuner" are drawing to a close. Start thinking today about the workarounds you'll need to use in the near future.

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post #16 of 24 Old 11-05-2008, 02:36 PM
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I think Citibear was trying to say with digital cable most of the channels will be scrambled and therefor to watch 2 different digital channels one would need 2 cable boxes or a single box with 2 tuners.
Cable ready TVs/DVDRs will not be able to get the new digital channels like they were able to do with analog cable. They want to force everyone to have a cable box and that way they will be able to control exactly what channels you can get as well tempting you to buy extras like PPV. Actually it's a good business model for them but not as handy for subscribers such as yourself.
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post #17 of 24 Old 11-05-2008, 04:06 PM
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If they try to shove a box down my throat I will seriously consider either downgrading to limited basic or dropping cable and going OTA only (the reason I might keep limited basic is to get the out-of-market Los Angeles stations that are on cable here). I did not buy 2 tv sets and a DVD recorder all with digital tuners just to hook a stupid box up to them. I think a lot of people will dump cable if they try to force boxes down everyone's throats. Thye tried this before in the 80's and popular demand forced them to stop scrambling expanded basic. The proliferation of clear QAM tuner equipped sets will lead to another revolt against boxes.

How can we say "the digital transition is complete" when thousands of low power stations are still broadcasting in analog?
LOW POWER ANALOG NEEDS TO DIE NOW!!!
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post #18 of 24 Old 11-05-2008, 05:38 PM
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I will seriously consider either downgrading to limited basic or dropping cable and going OTA only (the reason I might keep limited basic is to get the out-of-market Los Angeles stations that are on cable here). I did not buy 2 tv sets and a DVD recorder all with digital tuners just to hook a stupid box up to them. I think a lot of people will dump cable if they try to force boxes down everyone's throats.

The more "must have" channels the cable companies scramble will turn into new revenue as cable boxes are the only option for many folks. In my household the "must have" channel is Turner Classic Movies, a Comcast digital premium channel locally mapped to channel 501 on digital and HD converter boxes. I have three Panasonic DVD recorders and one Philips HDD/DVD recorder enslaved to a Motorola DTC700 digital converter box for the sole purpose of time-shifting from TCM.

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post #19 of 24 Old 11-05-2008, 07:15 PM
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velocci:
Some cable companies keep the basic digital channels (like the basic analog ones) in the clear, while there are some other cable companies that scramble everything. I'm on Cogeco in the Hamilton / Wentworth area, which allows me to receive over 70 clear QAM (digital) channels, so the average HD TV with a QAM tuner will be able to tune in all of these clear QAM (digital) channels without an additional HD or SD box.

I have been told by people living in Toronto that Rogers doesn't have ANY digital channels, including the local ones in the clear, so you will receive only the analog channels through your HD TV's tuner, but not the QAM ones. As a result, you will need a digital HD or SD box to view those, and depending on the type of box, some HDD boxes will let you view one and record another channel, while other boxes don't have that feature.

I can tell you right now that unless you subscribe to HD service, get a (HDD) HD box, and a HD TV, and ONLY view HD material -- you will be VERY disappointed! And even then, unless your eyes are very forgiving, the motion blur on any LCD TV will make you want to consider Plasma, or switching back to a CRT TV.
At the same time, unless the material on your Pioneer DVD recorder was recorded from an extra high-quality source, you will also be very disappointed when you view it on any larger LCD TV (>27"). VHS tapes become practically unwatchable on anything over 20".
If you intend to view a lot of SD stuff, I would stick with the CRT TV until flat panel technology solves some more of its flaws and quirks, or does a better job upscaling SD material. Some people will disagree with this, but then, some people are a lot less critical than others.
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post #20 of 24 Old 11-07-2008, 10:52 AM - Thread Starter
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hi, here are some questions based on your reply:

1. what is QAM?
2. are you saying that if i get an LCD tv, the regualr analog 4:3 channels will look horrible on this tv?
3. are you saying that all LCD TVs, even the new ones today, have motion blurr?
4. so if i record analog channels on my pioneer PVR, it will look horrible on a 32" LCD? even if i use the 4:3 setting on the TV?

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velocci:
Some cable companies keep the basic digital channels (like the basic analog ones) in the clear, while there are some other cable companies that scramble everything. I'm on Cogeco in the Hamilton / Wentworth area, which allows me to receive over 70 clear QAM (digital) channels, so the average HD TV with a QAM tuner will be able to tune in all of these clear QAM (digital) channels without an additional HD or SD box.

I have been told by people living in Toronto that Rogers doesn't have ANY digital channels, including the local ones in the clear, so you will receive only the analog channels through your HD TV's tuner, but not the QAM ones. As a result, you will need a digital HD or SD box to view those, and depending on the type of box, some HDD boxes will let you view one and record another channel, while other boxes don't have that feature.

I can tell you right now that unless you subscribe to HD service, get a (HDD) HD box, and a HD TV, and ONLY view HD material -- you will be VERY disappointed! And even then, unless your eyes are very forgiving, the motion blur on any LCD TV will make you want to consider Plasma, or switching back to a CRT TV.
At the same time, unless the material on your Pioneer DVD recorder was recorded from an extra high-quality source, you will also be very disappointed when you view it on any larger LCD TV (>27"). VHS tapes become practically unwatchable on anything over 20".
If you intend to view a lot of SD stuff, I would stick with the CRT TV until flat panel technology solves some more of its flaws and quirks, or does a better job upscaling SD material. Some people will disagree with this, but then, some people are a lot less critical than others.

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post #21 of 24 Old 11-07-2008, 11:40 AM
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tac7 will have the best info on Canadian cable, but just to make a quick answer: "clear QAM" is the cable-TV version of digital transmission, or you could say it was ATSC over cable. ATSC is the hi-def over-the-air broadcast standard now mandatory in the states and slowly being adopted in Canada (it will be required in Canada about three years from now). The goal of "clear QAM" was to make ATSC stations available over cable without requiring a cable box, but in reality many USA cable companies make a mockery of this by moving the channel numbers around every few weeks, confusing everyone. Regulations in Canada may be stricter which could make clear QAM more useful to you. In the USA, you're pretty much screwed if you refuse to use the decoder box. To make things more confusing, "digital cable" is not the same as ATSC or clear QAM: its just a way for the cable company to deliver more channels and pay per view features. So really, there's no way of knowing what you'll be able to receive without a box until you hook your equipment up to the cable line and experiment.

As for the rest, I'm in total agreement with tac7: any material that's 4:3 or old-style standard definition looks disgusting on LCD. Normal commercial DVDs will just about pass and usually look good, but some won't.These panels are designed specifically for Hi Def cable and satellite, and nothing else. This is the "dirty little secret" no one talks about regarding the big widescreen panels, and why many of us wish we could still buy a new 32" Trinitron instead. If all you do is watch football and network reality shows, they're great. But if you like obscure special interest cable channels or have lots of home-recorded DVDs, an LCD panel will be the biggest letdown you ever experience. The new "enhanced for motion" panels are only slightly improved, they still look like crap overall with SD sources. Like a lot of other consumer electronics trends, the consumer is not always right:they flocked in droves to LCD because its thinner than plasma, easier to hang on a wall, and doesn't have a glossy screen. But the truth is plasma is much better showing non-HD material. Too bad they're being phased out due to unpopularity: LCD panels will not come close to their performance until the excellent OLED technology drops to an affordable price.

Short-term, if you don't go bigger than the 32" size you're considering, you might be able to live with the compromises of an LCD panel, assuming you don't sit right on top of it. At 42" and up, standard-def performance gets much worse. Right now in the USA, a lot of mid-size plasma panels are on closeout sale for amazing prices, you might want to check your local stores and if you like the look better than LCD, get one while you still can.
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post #22 of 24 Old 11-07-2008, 01:12 PM - Thread Starter
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what does QAM stand for?

someone here at work has a 42" LCD and he said standard channels look fine on his TV. could it be that you guys just have really high standards? I never heard that standard channels are crappy on LCDs. does it make a difference if these standard channels are comming from an HD converter box rather than using the built-in tuner of the TV?


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Originally Posted by CitiBear View Post

tac7 will have the best info on Canadian cable, but just to make a quick answer: "clear QAM" is the cable-TV version of digital transmission, or you could say it was ATSC over cable. ATSC is the hi-def over-the-air broadcast standard now mandatory in the states and slowly being adopted in Canada (it will be required in Canada about three years from now). The goal of "clear QAM" was to make ATSC stations available over cable without requiring a cable box, but in reality many USA cable companies make a mockery of this by moving the channel numbers around every few weeks, confusing everyone. Regulations in Canada may be stricter which could make clear QAM more useful to you. In the USA, you're pretty much screwed if you refuse to use the decoder box. To make things more confusing, "digital cable" is not the same as ATSC or clear QAM: its just a way for the cable company to deliver more channels and pay per view features. So really, there's no way of knowing what you'll be able to receive without a box until you hook your equipment up to the cable line and experiment.

As for the rest, I'm in total agreement with tac7: any material that's 4:3 or old-style standard definition looks disgusting on LCD. Normal commercial DVDs will just about pass and usually look good, but some won't.These panels are designed specifically for Hi Def cable and satellite, and nothing else. This is the "dirty little secret" no one talks about regarding the big widescreen panels, and why many of us wish we could still buy a new 32" Trinitron instead. If all you do is watch football and network reality shows, they're great. But if you like obscure special interest cable channels or have lots of home-recorded DVDs, an LCD panel will be the biggest letdown you ever experience. The new "enhanced for motion" panels are only slightly improved, they still look like crap overall with SD sources. Like a lot of other consumer electronics trends, the consumer is not always right:they flocked in droves to LCD because its thinner than plasma, easier to hang on a wall, and doesn't have a glossy screen. But the truth is plasma is much better showing non-HD material. Too bad they're being phased out due to unpopularity: LCD panels will not come close to their performance until the excellent OLED technology drops to an affordable price.

Short-term, if you don't go bigger than the 32" size you're considering, you might be able to live with the compromises of an LCD panel, assuming you don't sit right on top of it. At 42" and up, standard-def performance gets much worse. Right now in the USA, a lot of mid-size plasma panels are on closeout sale for amazing prices, you might want to check your local stores and if you like the look better than LCD, get one while you still can.

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post #23 of 24 Old 11-07-2008, 01:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CitiBear View Post

The goal of "clear QAM" was to make ATSC stations available over cable without requiring a cable box, but in reality many USA cable companies make a mockery of this by moving the channel numbers around every few weeks, confusing everyone. Regulations in Canada may be stricter which could make clear QAM more useful to you.

I've had some recent discussions with a CRTC employee who deals with the cable sector and the word is that QAM in Canada is as dead a duck here as it will be/is in the U.S.
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post #24 of 24 Old 11-07-2008, 01:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by velocci View Post

what does QAM stand for?

someone here at work has a 42" LCD and he said standard channels look fine on his TV. could it be that you guys just have really high standards? I never heard that standard channels are crappy on LCDs. does it make a difference if these standard channels are comming from an HD converter box rather than using the built-in tuner of the TV?

Here's what I've found on my three LCDs with basic (analog) cable, no box... my SD channels look good from the proper viewing distance, and the smaller ones (32" 768p and 37" 768p) even look good closeup. My 47" 1080p looks pretty bad closeup cuz 1080p shows every flaw in an SD pic.

All my LCDs are outstanding on digital channels, including my "Kodak Moment" when playing a DVD, "Disturbia," on my 1080p LCD... put my nose almost on the screen and couldn't tell it had any pixels... looked like a continuous-tone photo!
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