Super VHS family movies to DVD or Blu-Ray? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 58 Old 02-04-2012, 10:40 AM - Thread Starter
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I have an old Panasonic videocam which was used to record some family movies on VHS-C sized cassettes in Super-VHS and regular VHS formats. I would like to plan a strategy to transfer these movies to a digital format and am seeking advice and suggestions on the best way to approach this.

I have a Windows 7 PC with an ATI Radeon 5850 video card. I also have Hauppauge 1800 and Ceton InfiniTV 4 tuner/recorder internal cards installed in the computer. The Hauppauge tuner has a S-Video input.

I do not have a DVD or Blu-Ray recorder, but would be willing to purchase one.

I am assuming that I can play the old VHS-C tapes in the videocam and output the signal via the S-Video output on that. (I'm sure there are no Super-VHS standalone players to be found now. Mine broke years ago. I think I do still have a VHS-C to VHS adapter, though.) Does S-Video carry both audio and video? I don't see any audio outputs on the camcorder, nor any audio inputs on the Hauppauge card. The Ceton card has only the coax cable TV signal input.

Beyond the above, I am lost as far as hardware and software considerations.

I wouldn't attempt this, except that the movies involved have considerable sentimental value to the family.

Any thoughts, please? Thanks very much.
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post #2 of 58 Old 02-04-2012, 11:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ed1 View Post

Does S-Video carry both audio and video? I don't see any audio outputs on the camcorder, nor any audio inputs on the Hauppauge card. The Ceton card has only the coax cable TV signal input.

Hi there, you're right, S-Video is just for video. Your PC must have some audio inputs, mainly a "Mic" (microphone) in, maybe in the front, but since your camcorder doesn't have audio outputs, you have to buy a working 2nd hand S-VHS from ebay or craiglist, then do the conections to your PC and have a fun time coping and editing the videos, then burning to a DVD or Blue Ray.

BTW there's no cheap STB Blue-Ray recorders on the USA, and the DVD recorder's days are almost over.
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post #3 of 58 Old 02-04-2012, 11:21 AM
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Internal DVD burners are really cheap, you can pick up a nice one for around $25. Your Hauppauge tuner has s-video in (not s-vhs, that's a recording standard) and L/R audio, so it appears you have all the hardware needed. Don't forget you need to connect up the audio also.

You'll probably use something in the Hauppauge software to capture the output of the videocamera and save the data to an mpeg or ts file. Then you'll need software to do some light editing and then burn the file to DVD. Check out VideoReDo:

http://www.videoredo.com/en/index.htm

They have a free trial you can download. If you like it buy it. It might take you some time to figure out how to do it all but shouldn't be that difficult.

Another option is to buy a standalone DVR with hard drive that offers editing capability and then burning to DVD's. I think there's one on eBay right now :-)
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post #4 of 58 Old 02-04-2012, 01:30 PM
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Two questions come to mind: what is your budget, and what is your time frame? These would factor into some of the suggestions I might give.

My personal take is that dubbing VHS-C directly to the PC is a big pain. Many here prefer to do it this way, because of the flexibility and control, but all I can think is they must lead charmed lives. Every single time I've tried dubbing VHS to PC I get bombarded with technical glitches requiring more time, effort, software and external boxes than I want to deal with. I would only use the PC method if you had a particular interest in creating large uncompressed general-purpose AVI video files from the tapes (which can be saved indefinitely and easily reformatted to anything from cell phone to BluRay to whatever video standard replaces BluRay). If you don't really see yourself or anyone else in your family being interested in a lifetime project like that, and the task has been left eagerly to you, you'll probably find a DVD/HDD recorder is the least troublesome way to go. You dub the VHS-C to the hard drive of the recorder, make minor edits (trims, rearrange scenes) then dub the DVD copies in high speed. You can make many backup DVDs, and if needed later the DVDs can be ripped to anybodys PC hard drive and kept there for easy access.

The big drawback here is that the last easily-available and reasonably-priced DVD/HDD recorder left in North America was discontinued two weeks ago: the scarcity and last-minute panic-buyers have already resulted in price gouging. This is where my questions of budget and time frame enter: if you can hold off on this project for a couple months, all the procrastinators who are artificially inflating prices should settle down and supply/pricing of leftover Magnavox MDR513 and MDR515 DVD/HDD recorders should ease up a bit. Last month you could order a Magnavox from WalMart or J&R for $169-229. Today, the only source is Amazon speculators who bought up the last stocks and are asking $300-400. The Magnavox was a great value at $200, at $400 I wouldn't touch it- thats far more than its worth. If you can't wait to see if prices settle down, you might consider a Panasonic EH59 or EH69 instead, available from B&H photo for about $350. These are well worth $350 for their additional editing features.

Although these recorders retain their value and can easily be resold on eBay at only a slight loss when you're done with them, I can understand if you do not want to make even a temporary outlay of a couple hundred bucks- times are tough. You are fortunate in at least already having a computer with video input card, and can make do with that if you don't mind a little more effort. You would just need to add a DVD burner, as others have mentioned you can buy one for under $30. You do need to determine what kind of internal drive connector your PC uses: if it came with Windows 7 pre-installed its probably the newer, more common SATA. If the PC is more than a few years old and you added Windows 7 yourself, it may need the earlier EIDE burner models. External USB2 burners are also available, for as little as $20 on eBay. There's no real advantage to dubbing SVHS to BluRay unless you just prefer BluRay: the drive is more expensive ($100), the blanks are more expensive ($2-3), and the software for authoring BluRay is a bit more complicated than for DVD.

The issue of no audio outputs on your VHS-C camcorder may not actually be a problem: the SVHS models often had the usual 3.5mm "headphone minijack" connector plus a separate S-video connector with no obvious audio outputs. If you don't see a round minijack, check under all flaps and maybe the grip: its almost certainly on the camera someplace. The minijack is a often a trick jack with multiple purpose: if you plug in headphones its a headphone jack, if you plug in a mic it acts like a mic jack, and if you plug in the common "camcorder breakout cord" it becomes an audio/video output jack. These special cords have a "haedphone" plug on one end and three RCA plugs on the other end: yellow (video) red (audio R) and white (audio L). Once connected, you use either the yellow video plug or the separate S-video connector on the camera for video, plus the audio plugs. You may need to choose S-Video or composite (yellow plug) using a menu in the camera viewfinder. If you tell us the camera brand and model, someone here can help you find the audio outputs.

You may well be one of the lucky people who connects their camcorder to their PC and encounters no problems at all capturing their old analog videos. I truly hope that is the case. But if you do experience a problem, the most typical would be the video card in the PC dropping frames and causing lipsync audio to drift. This requires a Time Base Corrector (TBC) to fix- if necessary you should be able to find a nice used AVT-8710 TBC on eBay for about $100, which you can resell once you're finished with it. You might not even need the TBC if you and the family are not particular about perfect lipsync: the problem is much less obvious in personal videos than it is in TV shows or movies with scripted dialog. Other camcorder>PC dubbing glitches are more complicated, and vary from user to user. You'll probably be just fine, assuming your videos are all first generation (recorded directly on the camera, not copies). If your results show anything really odd, come back to AVS and describe the specific issues, and more experienced folk will jump in to help you with solutions. Good luck!
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post #5 of 58 Old 02-04-2012, 02:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CitiBear View Post

The big drawback here is that the last easily-available and reasonably-priced DVD/HDD recorder left in North America was discontinued two weeks ago: the scarcity and last-minute panic-buyers have already resulted in price gouging. This is where my questions of budget and time frame enter: if you can hold off on this project for a couple months, all the procrastinators who are artificially inflating prices should settle down and supply/pricing of leftover Magnavox MDR513 and MDR515 DVD/HDD recorders should ease up a bit. Last month you could order a Magnavox from WalMart or J&R for $169-229. Today, the only source is Amazon speculators who bought up the last stocks and are asking $300-400. The Magnavox was a great value at $200, at $400 I wouldn't touch it- thats far more than its worth. If you can't wait to see if prices settle down, you might consider a Panasonic EH59 or EH69 instead, available from B&H photo for about $350. These are well worth $350 for their additional editing features.

Your info is outdated...Walmart has since re-stocked on the Magnavox 513s at least, over 2000 available:

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Magnavox-M...order/14291489

There is also a comprehensive sticky thread here in this forum on its usage.
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post #6 of 58 Old 02-04-2012, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by dare2be View Post

Your info is outdated...Walmart has since re-stocked on the Magnavox 513s at least, over 2000 available

Yeah, well, I'm in good company then : wajo himself was so sure the sky had fallen he got the moderators to give him a premature "what do we do now!?!?!?" sticky thread . We're not that far off, though: the fact WalMart restocked unexpectedly means nothing in the larger scheme. It just means they and the mfr failed to coordinate on delivery of the last batch. The machines are still scheduled for extinction in March, and since we are the only market left where the mfr still distributes DVD/HDD or BD/HDD, theres little to no chance of a followup. Europe and Asia were far better markets for these machines, since they have been discontinued there since last year I wouldn't count an anyone rushing to serve notoriously fickle and cable-PVR-obssessed Americans and Canadians.

To the original poster, ed1: the current WalMart price of $198 for the Magnavox 513 is a steal. If you can possibly afford it, buy one (while you can) to dub your camcorder tapes to DVD. It has a very good encoder chip thats optimized for VHS input, avoiding many possible hiccups involved with PC dubbing. You can always resell it later for $150 when your family dubbing project is completed.
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post #7 of 58 Old 02-04-2012, 03:50 PM - Thread Starter
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Thank you everyone for your comments. I have been trying most of the day to learn as much as I can about all of this.

CityBear, I understand that that Magnavox recorder has a HDD which facilitates editing prior to recording. Is the editing and recording software built in to the player itself? Or do I need to get the recorder and editing software as well. (I am assuming that the device burns disks without additional software.)

Will the Magnavox 513 accept an RCA audio line in and a S-Video line in?

Sorry to sound like so much of a novice . . .
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post #8 of 58 Old 02-04-2012, 04:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ed1 View Post

Thank you everyone for your comments. I have been trying most of the day to learn as much as I can about all of this.

CityBear, I understand that that Magnavox recorder has a HDD which facilitates editing prior to recording. Is the editing and recording software built in to the player itself? Or do I need to get the recorder and editing software as well. (I am assuming that the device burns disks without additional software.)

Will the Magnavox 513 accept an RCA audio line in and a S-Video line in?

Sorry to sound like so much of a novice . . .



You may be stuck in "computer mode". While, like most electronics (if not all) the Maggie recorders do have "software", they're just recorders that do their job like an old VCR did. They have inputs for external audio/video sources, and TV tuners that can record off the air (or off unscrambled cable).

For your purpose, you'd have to feed audio and video from the old recordings (I don't know how, you know your equipment) into the Magnavox recorder. You'd hit "record" on the Magnavox, and then start playing the old recordings into the Maggie.

Once you're done, go back into the recording that's now on the Maggie's hard drive (using the onscreen menus), and cut off any beginning and end bits you don't want, as well as anything in-between that you don't want.

Once the recording/s is/are transferred to the Maggie hard drive and edited, you pop a blank DVD into the DVD drawer, and use the machine's dubbing ability.

You'll have to learn how to do this from the instruction book, but once you're up to speed you'll be flying thru the process like you've been doing it all your life.

Your computer won't be involved at all, and the machine is a stand-alone device.

Get one. Use it. You'll like it.

EDIT:
Yes, the Magnavox recorders do have RCA audio inputs and an S-Video input. (You have to select that source using an onscreen menu.)
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post #9 of 58 Old 02-04-2012, 04:18 PM - Thread Starter
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You guys are very convincing!

Magnavox MDR-513H/F7 just ordered from WalMart.
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post #10 of 58 Old 02-04-2012, 04:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ed1 View Post

You guys are very convincing!

Magnavox MDR-513H/F7 just ordered from WalMart.

Click the 1st link in my sig. and bookmark that indexed list of help files.
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post #11 of 58 Old 02-04-2012, 04:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ed1 View Post

You guys are very convincing!

Magnavox MDR-513H/F7 just ordered from WalMart.


MWAH HAH HAH!!!

Another has been assimilated!




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post #12 of 58 Old 02-04-2012, 06:24 PM
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I'm not computer-editting literate, so my choice would be the dvdr-with-hdd route, but you should be aware that the Magnavox has VERY LIMITED edit ability, cut and trim delete only.

There is no reason to go blu-ray; regular dvd has a resolution of around 500 to 520 lines per inch, and s-vhs/s-video 400.

My guess is that you may want to do some editting, maybe grouping of scenes by family, by occasion (birthdays, Christmases, travels, etc). If so, forget the Magnavox, spend the $400 for the Panasonic EH59 or EH69. The PLAYLIST feature on the Panasonics is very powerful and flexible. ANY scenes from one or multiple titles stored on the HDD can be pulled into a Playlist. Each Playlist becomes a separate title on the dvd, and multiple titles and/or Playlists can be put onto a dvd, up to the capacity of the dvd, which is quite good up to 4 hours. Standard is 2 hours per dvd. Except for overlaying audio and customizing menus, I think I can do just about anything in Playlist that can be done on computer, and thank you, Citibear, probably much simpler and easier.

The Magnavox is good for what it does, with user-replaceable hdd and dvd-burner; just don't expect any serious editting.
_
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post #13 of 58 Old 02-04-2012, 10:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardT View Post

I'm not computer-editting literate, so my choice would be the dvdr-with-hdd route, but you should be aware that the Magnavox has VERY LIMITED edit ability, cut and trim delete only.

There is no reason to go blu-ray; regular dvd has a resolution of around 500 to 520 lines per inch, and s-vhs/s-video 400.

My guess is that you may want to do some editting, maybe grouping of scenes by family, by occasion (birthdays, Christmases, travels, etc). If so, forget the Magnavox, spend the $400 for the Panasonic EH59 or EH69. The PLAYLIST feature on the Panasonics is very powerful and flexible. ANY scenes from one or multiple titles stored on the HDD can be pulled into a Playlist. Each Playlist becomes a separate title on the dvd, and multiple titles and/or Playlists can be put onto a dvd, up to the capacity of the dvd, which is quite good up to 4 hours. Standard is 2 hours per dvd. Except for overlaying audio and customizing menus, I think I can do just about anything in Playlist that can be done on computer, and thank you, Citibear, probably much simpler and easier.

The Magnavox is good for what it does, with user-replaceable hdd and dvd-burner; just don't expect any serious editting.
_




Ummm...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ed1 View Post

You guys are very convincing!

Magnavox MDR-513H/F7 just ordered from WalMart.


The OP has stated they've already ordered a Magnavox.
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post #14 of 58 Old 02-05-2012, 03:27 AM
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Two hours later is often not too late to cancel an order if he has second thoughts, and it can also be returned after either trying or not trying it out first.
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post #15 of 58 Old 02-05-2012, 01:31 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the back and forth, guys.

While I know there may be machines out there with better editing capabilities, for now I am really intending this to be a one-time project with a few very old tapes being converted. I am not looking for a polished finished product. Any edits will most likely be just a crisp start and stop at beginning and end.

But, of course, I may appreciate the finer points once I get started. Who knows?

I understand from this thread and others that the Magnavox 513 is a very capable machine. As of now, I am comfortable the decision to go with the Magnavox rather than either the PC method or a higher-end HDD-DVD recorder. And, yes, while I ordered from W.com, I know I can return the item to any of W's local stores for a full refund.

As I've said, I very much appreciate the information and thoughts provided by all of the contributors to this thread.
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post #16 of 58 Old 02-05-2012, 03:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ed1 View Post

...While I know there may be machines out there with better editing capabilities, for now I am really intending this to be a one-time project with a few very old tapes being converted. I am not looking for a polished finished product. Any edits will most likely be just a crisp start and stop at beginning and end.

But, of course, I may appreciate the finer points once I get started...

AFAICT, you can PAUSE the recording of *ANY* DVDR, with or without HDD, cue / move your SOURCE to a different point and then continue recording.

The benefit of the Panasonic DVDRs w/HDD is that you can transfer 2 hours of VHS tape, for example, to the HDD in one operation. Then, you can mark 'Chapters', for lack of knowing the correct term, and create a PLAYLIST for recording with something like:

- 'Create a DVD in This Order':
  1. Chapter 5
  2. Chapter 9
  3. Chapter 2
  4. Chapter 23
  5. Chapter 1
  6. etc...
Sounds very convenient, but, you can work around it on the Magnavox *IF* you feel the need to.

Low Post Count <> Low Knowledge ergo High Post Count <> High Knowledge

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post #17 of 58 Old 02-05-2012, 08:36 PM
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I just didn't want Ed1 to be surprised. Now that he can/has made an informed choice, it's his decision. O sure, he can even get fancy and merge from two inputs (two vcr's) if he wishes.

I did a bit of editting Hi-8 using a pair of Sony EV-S7000. using the Assemble Edit; pre-define up to 8 edit scenes, and the machine would wind back and forth to pull them in as defined. Very nice; during the actual recording I could concentrate on the audio level using a simple audio mixer. I have some 50 or more Hi-8 Masters. But when I wanted to mix portions from 4 different camera tapes, that's when I waited for PC editting. My experience with the worse-than-worthless Video Wave soured me on the PC edit. In a few years, I learned of the Panasonic E100H, loaded the four tapes on the HDD, what a dream! Added some on-dvd titles. Beautiful. Similar to the Assemble Edit, but from the entire HDD.
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post #18 of 58 Old 02-05-2012, 11:27 PM
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ed1, just to reassure you that you probably made a good decision to go with the Magnavox 513:

1. WalMart will take it back no questions asked if you don't like it. The Panasonic EH59 and EH69, while more fully-featured, are sold only thru a professional NYC photographic specialist and a couple other niche dealers who have little to no patience with "consumer" buyers who are unsure of an item they ordered being suitable for them. They would take the Panasonic back, of course, but with more of a hassle than just dropping the Magnavox off at the nearest WalMart returns counter next time you need paper towels and dog food.

2. For the simple editing tasks you have in mind, the Magnavox is just fine. Its difficult to explain before you even have a recorder in your hands to play with, but I'll try to describe why RichardT prefers the Panasonic interface and what ClearToLand meant by "working around" the Magnavox limitations:

Prior to the Magnavox being offered, all DVD/HDD recorders (including the Panasonics) were priced at roughly $449-499. At this price level, it was common to offer an editing feature called the "copy list" which allows "nondestructive editing". Having this feature is make-or-break for RichardT, so he will naturally rate the Magnavox much lower for not having it. But, one has to consider the Magnavox sells for only $198: to achieve this remarkable low price while keeping a widescreen digital tuner and high-quality video encoder, something had to go. That something was soup-to-nuts editing features like "copy list."

The term "copy list" is borrowed from TV production gear, where HDD video editing began 20 years ago at a cost of $50,000 for something not much different from the current Panasonic or Magnavox DVD/HDD machines. When you perform "normal" or "destructive" editing on VHS, DVD or HDD, it means you are working on the original recording that you made. If you erase part of the tape, the video is gone forever. On the Magnavox HDD, if you cut out a "bad" part of a home video dubbed from VHS (out of focus, poor sound, lens cap was left on), that piece is permanently erased and you can't get it back.

While this sounds scary, it really isn't that crucial when digitizing VHS tapes: once you get the hang of how to operate the Magnavox its pretty unlikely you will make some horrible mistake like deleting the scene of Aunt Tilly blowing out her birthday candles (instead of the scene just before where the camera was running unattended for five minutes pointed at a brick wall). If you did make such a mistake, you still have the tapes: just dub that one scene back into the Magnavox HDD recorder. Problem solved.

The more expensive recorders like Panasonic give you a choice: editing the video on the HDD directly (like the Magnavox does) or using the "copy list." A copy list is just that: a list of things you want to copy from HDD to DVD. This gets hard to explain, but here goes: when you have the copy list open in a Panasonic recorder, you choose whatever recordings you like from the HDD and add them to the list. Since the HDD can hold approx 60 VHS tapes worth of video, say you wanted to make a DVD with selected scenes from six of those tapes. You would choose each of those dubs and put them in the copy list. Once on the list, you can highlight each one and edit out everything but the scenes you want on the DVD.

However, these edits are not made to the actual recordings on the HDD: they are just stored in the copy list memory as a set of instructions. These tell the recorder to edit the video on the fly while it is burning the DVD copy (record this scene, but not that, then change to that tape dub and burn that scene, then change to this tape dub and and burn this scene, etc, until the DVD is finished). The actual dubs you made to the HDD recorder are not edited or cut, so if you change your mind about deleting a scene you can just tweak the copy list to put it back in (instead of having to go back to the actual tape and re-dub the scene into the recorder).

The Magnavox, OTOH, does not have this kind of "smart" or flexible copy list: you can't edit scenes in the copy list itself but must do it on the actual HDD recordings BEFORE choosing to copy them to DVD. So if you want to cut out the five minutes of the camera recording the brick wall in between Aunt Tilly opening her birthday presents and cutting her cake, you need to do that on the HDD recording before telling the Magnavox to burn it to DVD. If you make a mistake and cut out the wrong scene, you don't get a "do-over" but will need to dub from the tape again. I hope this is clear, I'm confusing myself trying to explain it .

On a similar note, lets go back to what the Magnavox and the Panasonic have in common: they both have HDDs capable of storing dozens of VHS tapes worth of videos. They both let you choose specific scenes from those different tapes, cut out parts you don't want, and re-arrange scenes to play in the order you desire on the final DVDs. When you want to get more creative, like use a scene from TAPE5 then a scene from TAPE2 then a scene from TAPE4 then a scene from TAPE1, it is admittedly easier with the Panasonic because you can fiddle with this in its copy list without changing the actual recordings. On the Magnavox, its a little more work because you need to edit each of the HDD dubs themselves. In my above example, if you wanted to mix and match ten minute scenes from four different tapes to make a single DVD, you would need to speed-search through each tape dub and split those scenes out to make them individually available on the Magnavox HDD. Then you can put them into the Magnavox copy queue in whatever order you want them to play on DVD, and burn your DVDs.

This is all ridiculously complicated to explain in words, but once you have the Magnavox in your hands to use it will all make sense very quickly. It is MUCH MUCH easier to do than to describe.
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post #19 of 58 Old 02-06-2012, 05:17 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks again, CitiBear, for the detailed description. I can't tell you how valuable this info is to a novice in this area. I really appreciate the time you have taken to explain. I hope others in my situation will benefit from reading through this thread.

I originally was thinking I would use the PC method, without a substantial cash outlay. Going with the Magnavox was a compromise in terms of cost and I am confident that machine will be enough for me. The ability to return locally for a full refund is a plus - not determinative, but a plus nevertheless.

The new Magnavox will arrive Wednesday or Thursday.

Do you (or does anyone) have any recommendations on the type of DVD to use?
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post #20 of 58 Old 02-06-2012, 05:23 AM
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See this help file, in the main thread for the Magnavox, for info on DVDs, plus lots more stuff indexed on pg. 1 of that thread.

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post #21 of 58 Old 02-06-2012, 05:42 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks, wajo. Very helpful. I guess DVD+R is the way to go.

I do have an old Panasonic DVD player that may predate the DVD+R format. I'm not sure it does but will check on that.
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post #22 of 58 Old 02-06-2012, 05:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ed1 View Post

Thanks, wajo. Very helpful. I guess DVD+R is the way to go.

I do have an old Panasonic DVD player that may predate the DVD+R format. I'm not sure it does but will check on that.

I use both DVD+R and -R and both would be fine for your new Mag if that old Panny doesn't like +R.
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post #23 of 58 Old 02-06-2012, 06:30 AM - Thread Starter
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I've confirmed that my Panasonic DVD player does NOT play DVD+R.

Once a DVD-R disk has been created and finalized, can it subsequently be re-recorded to the Mag 513's hard disk and then later re-recorded to a DVD+R?

Just thinking about my options if I change my DVD player. . .
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post #24 of 58 Old 02-06-2012, 06:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ed1 View Post

I've confirmed that my Panasonic DVD player does NOT play DVD+R.

Once a DVD-R disk has been created and finalized, can it subsequently be re-recorded to the Mag 513's hard disk and then later re-recorded to a DVD+R?

Just thinking about my options if I change my DVD player. . .

Yes, those would be multi-generational copies however, losing a little quality with each copy... if the very first original was not a pristine HQ recording from a digital/HD channel. See the three successive subjects in this help file for more info.

With your old-player situation, it would make sense, until you get all+R-capable equipment, to copy stuff to the Mag's HDD then dub to one or both -R/+R as needed? This is esp. true if you want to make copies for someone else and you don't know what equip. he/she has.
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post #25 of 58 Old 02-06-2012, 07:26 AM - Thread Starter
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I suppose another option (until I get a new DVD player) would be to record to DVD+R and just use the Mag 513 to play those rather than playing them on my old Panasonic player.

That would require me to keep the Mag 513 hooked up to my AV system though, which I wasn't really planning to do.
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post #26 of 58 Old 02-06-2012, 07:34 AM
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Sounds like DVD-R would be best for your current situation and future-planning? I don't think forcing yourself to +R is worth it for a single-purpose use like your family tapes archiving project.
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post #27 of 58 Old 02-06-2012, 07:51 AM - Thread Starter
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1. Can videos recorded to the Mag 513's hard disk be transferred to a portable computer HDD that is plugged in to the Mag 513?

2. Can videos recorded with the Mag 513 to a DVD-R or DVD+R disk be transferred to a computer HDD by putting the disk in the computer's DVD drive?

I am assuming the answer is YES to both, but just want to make sure.

3. What file format will the Mag 513 recorded videos be in?
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post #28 of 58 Old 02-06-2012, 08:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ed1 View Post

1. Can videos recorded to the Mag 513's hard disk be transferred to a portable computer HDD that is plugged in to the Mag 513?

2. Can videos recorded with the Mag 513 to a DVD-R or DVD+R disk be transferred to a computer HDD by putting the disk in the computer's DVD drive?

I am assuming the answer is YES to both, but just want to make sure.

3. What file format will the Mag 513 recorded videos be in?

I'd prefer to answer these questions in the main Mag thread (Sticky thread) so others with same questions will always be able to learn from them, but...

1. The Mag has no connections for external HDDs but can be made info a Dock-and-Play system with unlimited HDDs, as described here.

2. Yes, people copy Mag titles to DVDs and rip them to PCs using various SW where they can do more elaborate editing, etc. Here's one help file on that.

3. The Mag produces VOB files and one other "odd" folder, Video_RM, that is "useless" in PC editing just as the typ. Audio_TS folder is, as described in that PC Editing help file linked in #2. Several PC-editors advise "ignoring the Video_RM" folder. I'm not a PC-editor-type so don't take my word as gospel in this area.
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post #29 of 58 Old 02-06-2012, 09:22 AM
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The Magnavox sticky thread created and maintained by wajo is a vast compendium of valuable tips and FAQs on these recorders. There is no Magnavox question anyone can come up with today that wajo has not already examined in depth himself, indexed, and had two dozen dedicated Magnavox owners comment on.

HOWEVER, with all due deference to wajo and his many fine contributors, there is nothing new under the sun regarding the Magnavox that needs to immediately be diverted to the Magnavox sticky thread: that era has passed, as will the Magnavox itself in a few months. That sticky thread has become unwieldy and the novice who attempts to skim thru it without prior knowledge of lingo and topics can be confused by the index and overwhelmed by some endless repetitive topics that should have been curtailed and isolated two years ago, while other topics of wider current interest are cut short or discouraged by well-meaning but misguided self-appointed "hall monitors." Therefore it is still useful to this recorder forum to have separate threads by individual newcomers left open for awhile, until their initial questions are answered and they're comfortable enough to delve into the main Magnavox thread and continue their Magnavox-specific discussions there.

Someone like ed1, who comes to us with a general VHS to DVD question, gets several replies from various members with an eye toward discussing different PC or recorder solutions. If that newcomer decides to go the recorder route, their initial questions about the differences between PC and recorder workflow, as well as differences between recorders, should remain in their initial thread. It is not helpful to the forum at large or other newcomers to immediately shove them over into the Magnavox sticky thread, where their curiosity and enthusiasm will be submerged and lost in the barrage of "should I or shouldn't I update my firmware" comments or thousands of "I'm too cheap to pay for TiVO or a PVR for my cable service, so I bought a Magnavox despite warnings not to, only to discover it doesn't at all work like a TiVO, so I'm going to post fifty times in the next fifty days to complain about it and ask how to force it to do things it wasn't designed to do" posts.

This is an open forum: as long as members are willing to engage with newcomers in separate threads and those newcomers say they are gaining helpful information in this manner, it is to all our benefits to keep those initial new threads alive and not discourage them. The home video recording world does not entirely revolve around the Magnavox: even those of us who own and like them know they have certain limitations, and offer different advantages compared to alternative products. People should be encouraged to get their feet wet within the comfort of their own initial thread topic where they can freely discuss various questions of how a Magnavox may or may not be the best option for them, without having to sift thru pages and pages of posts that don't pertain to their situation, losing their initial train of thought, or getting stifled by overzealous partisans. If they then decide to go with a Magnavox, they can plunge into the main sticky thread at such time they are confident of navigating it.

BACK TO ed1: if your current DVD player has gotten funky and only plays DVD+R, your best course of action is to get rid of it. Multi region Philips DVD players can be had for $49, or just use the Magnavox itself as your new DVD player (it has more playback features than most other recorders and makes a suitable main player). Yes, you can burn DVD+R on the Magnavox and later rip it on a PC to DVD-R, but this again should not be necessary using any modern piece of hardware (player, recorder, PC drive) that is not broken in some way (they are all compatible with both -R and +R). Do note, however, that most blank media sold in stores is now optimized for PC burning and sometimes does not work that well in a DVD recorder. There have been increasing reports lately of store-bought +R having more burning problems in the Magnavox than store-bought -R. If you need to use +R for now to maintain compatibility with your old DVD player, consider ordering Verbatim DataLife AZO +R from an online dealer like NewEgg or supermediastore. The Verbatim "Life" +R sold in stores is the cheaper formula optimized for PCs.
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post #30 of 58 Old 02-06-2012, 11:46 AM - Thread Starter
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CityBear, I'm not sure you are accurate in your discussion of DVD-R and DVD+R in the last paragraph of your last post.

I understand from posts here and from initially reviewing some of the pages wajo refers to that DVD-R is the older format, DVD+R is the newer format, and DVD+R may be better for long-term archiving in that the disks themselves may hold up better over time.

My present DVD player is older than the DVD+R format and will not play it. If I get rid of my present player, which I am considering, it would be partly to gain the ability to play DVD+R. I realize that I could, as you point out, just use the Mag 513 instead as my primary player. (I'll decide on that after I see and use it.)

From my perspective, I agree with the points you've laid out in you last post. And, wajo's sticky thread and all of its related threads/posts are a wonderful resource for someone like me. It's an impressive, almost unbelievable, compilation of information.

Just wanted to correct what I think are some mis-references to DVD types in your last paragraph. . .

Again, I appreciate everyone's commets on this thread.
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