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post #31 of 38 Old 03-26-2012, 05:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclone82 View Post

There seems to be some attractive sales advertising for the TY's like 'OEM' kinda indicating they are what commercial discs are made from.

Careful what you read. Commercial discs are pressed and don't use any kind of dye. There is a lot of misinformation out there.

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Originally Posted by dare2be View Post

I'm confused where you got this information. All the research I've done is that there were 2 groups of manufacturers, one formed in 1995 and the other formed in 1997.

I'm going to let Luke speak for himself but yes, money had a lot to do with it. Pride as well. For instance Sony hates every format JVC and Panasonic invent and vice-versa. Not just the consumer VHS/Beta war but Sony and Panasonic are the biggest broadcast and production format rivals and to this day, there are very few Sony broadcast and pro production formats that Panasonic will use and there are very few Panasonic broadcast and pro production formats that Sony will use. Make not none with the exception of a few formats they co-invented.

Back to consumer formats, take Panasonic's DVD-RAM format. Sony is capable of making burners that will write/read RAM as seen in the PIO/Sony recorders but the Sony branded deck's firmware does not allow to write DVD-RAM, (it will read DVD-RAM.) Instead the Sony deck has that much memory space in the firmware for other things. The only reason Sony did this is so they don't have to use a Panasonic format (the licensing fee can't be that high but the pride is. Other manufactures decision is strictly money related.
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post #32 of 38 Old 04-09-2012, 07:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Super Eye View Post

Careful what you read. Commercial discs are pressed and don't use any kind of dye. There is a lot of misinformation out there.

Commercial pressed discs use a die.
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post #33 of 38 Old 02-02-2016, 12:02 PM
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Gold archival dvd's

Has anyone seen gold archival dvd's in "+R" (plus R)? For many reasons I prefer plus R to dash R. There doesn't seem to be any out there. Verbatim does not seem to make them.
Does anyone know why? mes.
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post #34 of 38 Old 02-02-2016, 12:04 PM
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http://www.mediasupply.coCloseout! Mitsui/MAM-A 4.7GB 8x Gold Archive DVD+R
Quantity: 50





1




Code: MAM83440
Sale Price: $120.90

m/mam83440.html

MickinCT

Last edited by mickinct; 02-02-2016 at 12:23 PM.
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post #35 of 38 Old 02-08-2016, 02:12 PM
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Wow! pricey. I wonder if it is worth the extra $$? I have heard some say plain old verbatim azo's are suppose to last 50 + years.
For realy looongg term storage, I wonder if M- disks that you burn with a blu ray burner would be a better choice for family archives to pass down to next gen.? Thanks.
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post #36 of 38 Old Today, 09:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pygar77 View Post
Wow! pricey. I wonder if it is worth the extra $$? I have heard some say plain old verbatim azo's are suppose to last 50 + years.
For realy looongg term storage, I wonder if M- disks that you burn with a blu ray burner would be a better choice for family archives to pass down to next gen.? Thanks.
M-Disc is your best bet, slated to last 1000 years.

Of course, finding a working DVD or BR player that can play that media that far in the future would be a task.


That which may be known of God is evident within man, for God has shown it to them, so that they are without excuse. (Romans 1:19-20)
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post #37 of 38 Old Today, 03:59 PM
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Important videos/data should be backed up to more than one media: multiple hard drives + optical discs, even tape drives. Accelerated aging tests are useful up to a point, but only offer a prediction. The real world is very different, and as tomwil said you're more likely to have trouble finding a good player/drive 20 years from now than anything else. The best strategy is to make duplicate archives to new formats every few years.

Gold discs cost a fortune because of the gold content, which allegedly resists decomposition better than the cheap reflective layer in standard discs. But the gold layer is not as reflective as standard aluminum, causing reading problems with some drives. So the alleged durability advantage is cancelled out by the significant possibility of reading errors years in the future. And gold dvds aren't made any better than "normal" dvds in other respects: they're equally susceptible to dye layer decomposition (esp if air gets into any hairline cracks that develop between the two plastic halves of the disc).

If you specifically need video DVDs, the very stable AZO dyes used in premium Verbatim discs offer 90% of the theoretical durability promoted by gold. If you don't particularly require a video DVD compatible with (rapidly-obsoleting) hardware DVD players, you might consider going with Blu Ray instead for long term video and high-capacity data storage. Standard BD-R technology is extremely similar to the overhyped M-disc, but less expensive per GB. For all practical purposes, you could say M-disc is simply BD-R tech retro-fitted to the smaller-capacity blank DVD format. I don't see the point in using such a Frankenstein non-standard drive/blank DVD system when you could easily choose the standard, much higher capacity BD-R. The only "gotcha" with BD-R is being careful not to buy the less-durable alternative "LTH" media, which is dye-based like recordable CD / DVD and has the same drawbacks. Standard "HTL" BD-R is the version akin to M-disc.

Some of us have been in this game long enough to experience our own "aging tests" - and have been surprised by some of the results. I have a huge number of various no-name CD-R discs made 14 years ago that are still perfectly fine, and quite a few ten-year-old garbage-brand dual-layer DVD-Rs that still play great (despite expectations they would rot within the first month). Even a few La Cie USB portable hard drives I bought in 2001 still read perfectly. OTOH, I've experienced read failures with some expensive high-end media in much shorter amounts of time. Ya never know, none of us knows.
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post #38 of 38 Old Today, 08:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CitiBear View Post
Some of us have been in this game long enough to experience our own "aging tests" - and have been surprised by some of the results. I have a huge number of various no-name CD-R discs made 14 years ago that are still perfectly fine, and quite a few ten-year-old garbage-brand dual-layer DVD-Rs that still play great (despite expectations they would rot within the first month).
LOL, I even have a couple Memorex DVD-R that I burned in 2004 that are still good.

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The bitterness of poor quality lasts long after the sweetness of the low price is forgotten . . . life is too short to drink bad wine

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