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post #121 of 145 Old 02-09-2017, 08:28 PM
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Sharp VCRs are well-regarded in USA as playback decks to make digital transfers. Used Sharps are very reasonably priced, have better than average picture quality for budget models, and better than average tracking of hifi audio as well as video.

But like any other brand, heavy heavy use will wear a Sharp down and degrade its performance. Remember, many of these VCRs are 20+ years old now: it is unrealistic to think they will be found in "like new" condition forever. In North America, Panasonic-made VCRs outsold every other brand 2:1, so by sheer numbers sold there are many more Panasonics available in pristine condition than other brands. Those who want a nice Sharp will need to search longer and harder than they would for a more common Panasonic or JVC.

North Americans abandoned VCRs very quickly once DVD players became affordable in 1999: this also improves the chances of finding lightly-used vcrs here. Other countries like Brazil did not change to dvd as quickly, so their VCRs were more heavily used and it is harder to find a nice one today.
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post #122 of 145 Old 02-11-2017, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by CitiBear View Post
Sharp VCRs are well-regarded in USA as playback decks to make digital transfers. Used Sharps are very reasonably priced, have better than average picture quality for budget models, and better than average tracking of hifi audio as well as video.

But like any other brand, heavy heavy use will wear a Sharp down and degrade its performance. Remember, many of these VCRs are 20+ years old now: it is unrealistic to think they will be found in "like new" condition forever. In North America, Panasonic-made VCRs outsold every other brand 2:1, so by sheer numbers sold there are many more Panasonics available in pristine condition than other brands. Those who want a nice Sharp will need to search longer and harder than they would for a more common Panasonic or JVC.

North Americans abandoned VCRs very quickly once DVD players became affordable in 1999: this also improves the chances of finding lightly-used vcrs here. Other countries like Brazil did not change to dvd as quickly, so their VCRs were more heavily used and it is harder to find a nice one today.
Actually, Brazil changed to DVDs pretty quickly too (around 2002 or so) and by 2005 VCRs and Pre-Recorded tapes got out of stores. I remember that the last VCR I had was in 2005 and we didn't have any other to change after it broke (Mid-90s Philips and a Sharp) and none of my neighbours had one too, only my uncle had one (Early 90s JVC Mono unit) and he gave it off in 2012 to another person for transfer tapes.
And by now, DVDs and even Blu-Rays are changing to Pay Television Services and Streaming Services like Netflix. I worked at a Store and I remember that we didn't have a lot of Blu-Rays to sell.
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post #123 of 145 Old 02-15-2017, 04:37 PM
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Actually, Brazil changed to DVDs pretty quickly too (around 2002 or so) and by 2005 VCRs and Pre-Recorded tapes got out of stores. I remember that the last VCR I had was in 2005 and we didn't have any other to change after it broke (Mid-90s Philips and a Sharp) and none of my neighbours had one too, only my uncle had one (Early 90s JVC Mono unit) and he gave it off in 2012 to another person for transfer tapes.
And by now, DVDs and even Blu-Rays are changing to Pay Television Services and Streaming Services like Netflix. I worked at a Store and I remember that we didn't have a lot of Blu-Rays to sell.
Although once DVD came out most consumers in Canada abandoned VCRs pretty quick. BUT - us Canadians that still wanted a new VCR were luckier than our USA neighbours because in Canada the push to digital was a lot slower than in the USA and we didn’t have those stupid dictator mandate laws forcing consumer electronics with a NTSC tuner to include a digital tuner. So we got brand new VCRs until the end of 2008 – maybe longer.

Just today (Feb 15 2017) I contacted a guy on local craiglist selling a new-in-sealed-box JVC HR-J693 for very cheap. He still didn’t get back to me – wish me luck.
Check out the date Sears got the unit November 29th 2007.


That particulate JVC was available from 2004 atleast to the end of 2008 in Canada. A SVHS like my HR-S5912U was available from 2003 to at least the end of 2008 in Canada.
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post #124 of 145 Old 02-16-2017, 05:03 PM
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Although once DVD came out most consumers in Canada abandoned VCRs pretty quick. BUT - us Canadians that still wanted a new VCR were luckier than our USA neighbours because in Canada the push to digital was a lot slower than in the USA and we didn’t have those stupid dictator mandate laws forcing consumer electronics with a NTSC tuner to include a digital tuner. So we got brand new VCRs until the end of 2008 – maybe longer.

Just today (Feb 15 2017) I contacted a guy on local craiglist selling a new-in-sealed-box JVC HR-J693 for very cheap. He still didn’t get back to me – wish me luck.
Check out the date Sears got the unit November 29th 2007.


That particulate JVC was available from 2004 atleast to the end of 2008 in Canada. A SVHS like my HR-S5912U was available from 2003 to at least the end of 2008 in Canada.
Well, good luck to you. Over here we still have analog TV but it's starting to fade away and by the next year everything will be digital too. One thing that I dislike about the analog TV here is that they used Pal-M instead of NTSC as a color TV standard since 1972. NTSC is more colorful than PAL-M and only the Analog TV used Pal-M since a Camcorder or a Video Game Console only outputs NTSC. If I record something I use NTSC since my Satellite Reciever outputs both NTSC and PAL-M and VCRs here can switch between NTSC and Pal-M.
VCRs here faded away quckly because of the piracy of DVD since you can just copy it over to the computer of even get a camcorder to a theatre and transfer to DVD and sell 5 movies for R$5,00 and say "you can find anything here pretty cheap" and the police would rarely get those sellers.
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post #125 of 145 Old 03-09-2017, 10:37 PM
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Old Beta deck repairs

12voltvids has a lot of Youtube videos on repairing VCRs, both Beta and VHS. I've also found that there are several outfits selling restored Beta units in the U.S. Unfortunately, that's not the case in Canada. Might have to look into that if I can't self repair the decks that have failed. Both my Sony SL-HFR70 decks have failed now. Probably both have lost that gear though replacement parts may be a possibility. I've tried to use the Youtube videos to track down what might be the problem with the tape not loading in my SL-2710 but the vids show other deck insides that are nothing like what's inside my unit. Contacts in Toronto have said that it's still pretty easy to find good working Beta Hifi units on Kijiji. Nothing in my area though.
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post #126 of 145 Old 03-13-2017, 02:00 PM
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Beta decks have had a long and tortured history of repair drama, dating back to when they were still new. Sony authorized repair depots were slow and expensive, but local techs who did great affordable work with VHS could easily wreck a Betamax due to unfamiliarity with the significantly different mechanical and electronic issues.

VHS mfrs very quickly learned how to make a reliable mechanism that didn't fail bi-annually, but Sony never got the memo. By 1984, VHS was nearly bullet-proof, while Sony continued to churn out one ridiculous Rube Goldberg transport after another (your average Betamax model would shoot a gear or pin out of its ventilation holes once a year well into the 1990s).

Beta fanciers eventually learned to avoid roughly 85% of all Sony models ever made, and stick to the small handful of workhorse models that had proved most reliable (or at least repairable) over the decades. Rule of thumb is, the more desirable the appearance and feature set of a Sony Betamax, the more likely it is to destroy your soul. Anything "slimline" made in the 1980s (like your 2710) is guaranteed to break, esp tracking control, and be very difficult/expensive to get repaired. Later slimline SuperBetas were much more reliable, but the capstan was an achilles heel that often needs rebuilding.

Much as it killed me, I finally gave up the "affordable" eBay/Craigs List lottery and resigned myself to paying outlandish prices for fully rebuilt, fully guaranteed Sonys sold by current, reputable, specialist used Betamax dealers. If you need a BetaMax to just work, so you can transfer your collection to digital, there is no other realistic option. Like nearly everything else mfrd by Sony in its heyday, most BetaMax models were needlessly complicated, needlessly expensive, bizarrely-engineered devices. In 2017, techs who can perform decent repairs on a VHS deck are scarce- techs who thoroughly understand Beta are nearly extinct. So buying a random Sony BetaMax is about as risky as buying the infamous Panasonic AG1980 SVHS: you will almost certainly inherit an excruciatingly difficult, pricey repair requirement.

I'd recommend looking for an SL-HF350, 360 or 660 if you need SuperBeta Hifi, SL-330 or 340 for SuperBeta monaural. These models are the easiest to restore (if the tech has parts), and most likely to remain in working condition for a couple years after being serviced. Buy from specialty Beta vendors on eBay or dedicated Beta repair websites. Expect to pay $200-$300 or more. If you don't need the "Super" feature, the older, more common SL-HF300, -400 or -500 Beta HiFi models are perhaps the best bet for ongoing repairability, as they contain the fewest "unobtainium" parts and are relatively simple to service. They were similar to your SL-HFR70, but had integrated HiFi instead of being "HiFi Ready". The HFR70 is notably more prone to issues, despite internal similarity to the integrated models.

Occasional load/eject issues will persist even after servicing, and heightened dropout visibility vs modern VHS decks is typical.
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post #127 of 145 Old 03-15-2017, 12:57 AM
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I always enjoy your posts Citibear. Even if I don't really care much about the content, as in the above post re beta recorders, your informed replies and common sense approach to these issues are both entertaining and instructive. "...your average Betamax model would shoot a gear or pin out of its ventilation holes once a year..." You have quite a way with words!
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post #128 of 145 Old 03-16-2017, 12:11 PM
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Aww, shucks: thanks for the nice feedback, ChurchAVGuy!

Early on, circa 1981, I began my home video insanity with Panasonic and RCA VHS: enormous, clunky machines which were not too good at second generation dubbing (already my primary criteria: right from the start I was cutting out commercials and making compilations). On the advice of a geek friend, I experimented with Beta, and discovered it was MUCH better for making second generation dubs (despite the standard Beta II speed being slower than VHS SP).

So for several years I ran a dual-format setup: VHS for mediocre timeshifting, and Beta for dubbing or keeper recordings. At first, I had the top-line Sony SL-5800, a sensation due to its introduction of speed search and slo-mo. It came with the near-magical BetaStack accessory, a dream come true for the truly obsessed among us. The stacker allowed you to coordinate multi-event timer settings with separate tapes, keeping each TV series or movie on its own tape at the fastest recording speeds. Short of owning four VCRs, this was the only way to go, and a feature I dearly missed when the time came to ditch Beta completely in favor of an all-VHS system.

The novelty of watching the stacker in action never wore off: it was really an amazing contraption. You loaded the first tape in the vcr, then up to three more went into the feed hopper. When the first tape ran out, or the timer triggered a change, the piano keys would depress by themselves in a mechanical ballet: first the eject key would go down, the hatch would pop up, and rollers would shoot that tape into a receiving tray. The next tape would drop from the chamber, rollers would reverse to shoot it into the hatch, then a finger would press down to close the tape hatch. The eject button would pop up, then the record button would depress by itself, and the unit would either continue recording or go into standby pending the next timer trigger. Unfortunately, no youTube vids exist of the thing working properly, but theres a quickie overview vid on youTube titled "A Camera Video of 3 Betamax BetaStacks (Changers)!!"

Once Beta HiFi debuted, the monaural SL-5800 had to be sold so I could upgrade. That was a sad moment, because to this day there has never been another VCR as luxurious in materials and tactile quality as the 5400-5600-5800 series. The initial HiFi model 5200 (pic here) was a downgrade: gigantic, clumsy, noisy, unreliable front-load box, the most depressing VCR I've ever owned. The HiFi audio was incredible, but all the thing did was record and play: it was stripped of all convenience features in order to meet a $599 holiday price at Macy's (yep, in 1983 Macys was the major Sony retailer).

Those "budget" front-load Sonys were all a mechanical disaster: like most, mine promptly croaked the minute its 90 day labor warranty expired. It wouldn't load or eject a tape unless you helped nudge the internal gear train with your hand, so I took all the screws off the cabinet (routinely lifting the hood every time I had to change a tape). A few months of that, and I was *done* with the Sony vcrs. I replaced that trainwreck with more elegant, reliable, convenient competitors: a Toshiba V-S36 BetaHiFi (seen here), and a NEC VC-739E. The Toshiba especially was arguably the high watermark of Beta HiFi: superb audio tracking, and video recording quality that remained competitive even after SuperBeta arrived.

When I precociously opened my own video rental store in 1985, it was clear Beta was already dead as a mass-appeal format, so I reluctantly stocked my place as VHS-only. During the ten years I had that shop, less than a dozen people asked if I carried Beta. I migrated myself to 100% VHS at home by 1987, tho I still had a couple hundred Beta tapes in storage. I eventually bought a cheap Sony SL-340 SuperBeta to handle those, but it died in 1997. My Betas just sat unplayed for years after that, until 2011 when I wanted to digitize some of them. Thus began my eBay odyssey of dysfuntional $100 beta vcrs, until I gave up and paid $350 for a fully reconditioned SL-HF360.

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post #129 of 145 Old 03-16-2017, 04:04 PM
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It's amazing how closely CBs and my early video history were. My first VHS(I wanted to get a Sony Beta SL-5800 from reading reviews but a friend who had a large personal VHS collection off early HBO and other pay channels talked me into VHS, also lack of rental stores featuring Beta pushed me into) a '82 RCA VFT-650. It was very advanced, AFAIK the first VCR to offer a IR wireless remote and had a full range of features such as slow-mo and frame by frame advance, oh I believe it cost me $1200 most of my savings at the time. A year or two later when I wanted to get into dubbing I purchased a clone to the RCA, a Magnavox. Not long after that I purchased a second hand Beta, the SL-5800 I wanted several years before, from the Sony Sound Center, a big dealer of Sony equipment in my town, it was dirt cheap(not much over $100 I believe) along with it I purchased the Beta Stacker, I believe it was NIB and worked great for up to 20hrs of unattended recording. I used both VHS and Beta for several years and would use Beta whenever I wanted to record more than 2hrs as IMO anything longer than that(SLP) looked like crap, even on my 26" Sony Trinitron KV-2680 TV, IMO the best TV in it's day, $1100 housed in a beautiful oak?? counsel.

Never owned a video store but I frequented MANY in my day, the first one was a local franchised Radio Shack that had several thousand VHS tapes by the time they stopped renting DVDs, oh they also rented RCA CED?? video discs which I understand were mostly crap and Laser Discs promoted by Pioneer which were the best picture quality at the time, I never used either. I also frequented many other video stores, US Video(the largest selection of Beta tapes in town), Video Update, Mr. Movies, West Coast Video and Hollywood Video to name a few, never a big fan of Blockbuster and avoided them like the plague.

It was the mid 90s?? before I got my first VHS HiFi as I didn't care how most HiFi machines used the, inferior for recording, narrower video heads that left much the tape unused when using SP, they were just fine for SLP, although I rarely if ever used SLP. Never owned a BetaHiFi nor Super Beta nor DVHS although I should have probably picked up a few DVHS machines when they were being blown out NIB for 2 or 3 hundred dollars in the late 00s.

CB and I also went in different directions in regards to DVDRs, he went with Pioneer and I Panasonic, mostly because my first experience with Pioneer was a crappy VHS/DVD combo that was build by someone other than Pioneer(a model 505?? or something I believe, cartoonish colored buttons and UGLY!). My first Panasonic was a ES-30v, a great VHS/DVD combo and had my favorite feature, the ability to record for more than 2hrs/DVD and still retain full D1 resolution, something critical for my VHS to DVD conversion project because I had many tapes ~2hrs 7 minutes up to 2hrs 42 minutes I didn't want to split nor record in 1/2 D1 resolution which looks like crap to my eyes.

Since my initial bad experience with a Pioneer I picked up a much nicer model, DVR-660 https://www.amazon.com/Pioneer-DVR-6...r+DVD+recorder which is a top of the line machine and makes wonderful full D1 2+hr recordings, unfortunately it's not really compatible with unfinalized Panasonic DVDs so it just sits on a shelf collecting dust, along with my similar great recording Toshiba XS-35, a wonder of a DVD recorder.

Several of my classic Panasonics are finally starting to suffer laser failure after 1000s of hours of recording, unfortunately they are getting harder and harder to find as the models I like best were basically only made from 2005 to 2006, luckily I don't record as much as I once did but I'm always on the lookout for such Panasonics in pawn and second hand shops, they are like hens teeth to find
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post #130 of 145 Old 03-16-2017, 10:25 PM
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I also frequented many other video stores, US Video(the largest selection of Beta tapes in town), Video Update, Mr. Movies, West Coast Video and Hollywood Video to name a few, never a big fan of Blockbuster and avoided them like the plague
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My sister worked at a small (I think) twin cities only video store called Tidal Wave. Ever hear of them? The store she was managing for several years was in Southtown off Penn Avenue. She told me that occasionally Joel Hodgson of MST3K fame would come into the store.

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post #131 of 145 Old 03-17-2017, 05:03 AM
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My sister worked at a small (I think) twin cities only video store called Tidal Wave. Ever hear of them?
I do remember Tidal Wave commercials(probably radio??) but I never rented there myself, Southtown is totally different now than back then, basically everything was torn down and put back up, even the large movie theater, mostly big box retailers now.
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post #132 of 145 Old 03-31-2017, 08:10 AM
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Which are a good vhs recorder to use with a video grabber ? (i need to substitute a samsung dvd\vhs reader not working anymore)
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post #133 of 145 Old 03-31-2017, 08:18 AM
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Is there anything that can be done (treatments, procedures, etc.) to restore old, fragile tapes. The first one I tried to transfer to DVD disintegrated inside the machine. Tape particles scattered so badly that the player was ruined!

I found my meds !!
Revel Ultima Salons & Voice / PSB B5 / PSA XV-15 / Emotiva XMC-1 / Emotiva XPA-5 / Oppo BDP-95 / Sony PS3 / Cable-TV / Panasonic 50" Plasma / Samsung 60" Plasma
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post #134 of 145 Old 03-31-2017, 05:45 PM
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Is there anything that can be done (treatments, procedures, etc.) to restore old, fragile tapes. The first one I tried to transfer to DVD disintegrated inside the machine. Tape particles scattered so badly that the player was ruined!
Not really: not if they're so far gone they're decomposing as they play and ruining your VCR heads in the process. Yes, they are some "urban myths" along the lines of baking them in an oven, etc, but these were tricks developed in the era of reel-to-reel audio. Preserving decrepit VHS is more the province of professionals at the Library Of Congress, not something easily done at home.

I'd suggest you sign up at the DigitalFaq.com forum, and ask there. The site is run by a professional video restorer who used to post quite often here and elsewhere, before concentrating on his own interests. He went under the handle "LordSmurf". There should be a way to send him a private message via DigitalFaq to ask his advice: he is honest and will tell you if he has any ideas you can pursue. If not, he'll tell you whether he is equipped to handle it for you, and what it would cost (not cheap).

Good luck!
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post #135 of 145 Old 03-31-2017, 05:54 PM
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Which are a good vhs recorder to use with a video grabber ? (i need to substitute a samsung dvd\vhs reader not working anymore)
What country do you live in? Not all VCRs are easily available everywhere.

In North America, the Mitsubishi HS-U448 and 449 are an excellent rugged choice. Some JVC series like HR-S5900 and 2900 are also popular with AVS members on a budget. Sharp was very good, and almost any Panasonic (aka Quasar, GE, Magnavox) made before 1997 should be quite decent. Sony I would avoid.
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post #136 of 145 Old 04-03-2017, 06:42 AM
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Hi,
I have a JVC HR D320E. Do you guys think that this one is good in terms of sound and image quality?
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post #137 of 145 Old 04-03-2017, 01:05 PM
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Welcome to the site my friend
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post #138 of 145 Old 04-03-2017, 01:34 PM
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The JVC HR D320E is nearly 30 years old now (made in 1988). Some of those old JVCs were very nice back then, but after all these years some of the electronics will have decayed, which might degrade the picture somewhat. If it seems in perfect working condition, it should be OK, but is really just an average entry-level VCR similar to many other budget models of the time.

It does not have the HiFi stereo audio feature, so sound quality is just OK: you won't have stereo, and it might be more hissy or muffled with slower LP tapes. The D320E only has two video heads, optimized for LP recording, so speed-search or slow motion playback of SP tapes will not be as nice as it is with LP tapes.*

*See my reply to jjeff below. The JVC literature is not clear on whether the D320E runs only at SP, or also has the slower LP speed. If it is SP-only, of course it will be good playing SP in all search modes. But if it does include LP, playback will be optimized for LP search instead.

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post #139 of 145 Old 04-03-2017, 02:24 PM
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...The D320E only has two video heads, optimized for LP recording, so speed-search or slow motion playback of SP tapes will not be as nice as it is with LP tapes.
I think you meant EP(as JVC called the 6hr speed) or SLP as everyone else called the 6hr speed. LP(4hr speed) was an orphan speed never really adopted by JVC. While JVCs would play LP I don't believe they ever made a model that would record LP. JVC jumped right from SP to EP for recording. While the D320E may be only 2 head VCR it would surprise me if JVC was making 2 head machines that far back, for a long time all JVCs had at least 4 video heads, two for SP and 2 for EP as JVC knew using EP heads for SP resulted in rather poor SP quality and I applaud them on that. You are correct, a 2 video head VCR not only makes poor SP recordings but also really bad SP searches and trick play. The absolute worst thing to do was record SP on such a machine and later play it back on a 4 head model, not only was trick play awful but the picture was very noisy/grainy
30 years ago doesn't seem that long ago when VCRs were king of hill.

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post #140 of 145 Old 04-04-2017, 07:53 AM
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I think you meant EP(as JVC called the 6hr speed) or SLP as everyone else called the 6hr speed. LP(4hr speed) was an orphan speed never really adopted by JVC.
Our NTSC bias is showing.

I had a moment of confusion there too, so had to double-check the specs between Europe and North America, then reconsider my reply to Mr. Guedes (who is asking about a PAL format JVC model).

PAL VHS never really adopted EP/SLP, because there was no need. A T120 in PAL is equivalent to NTSC T160 (2 hours 40 mins at SP), giving 5 hours 20 mins at PAL LP speed. Tape mfrs very quickly provided custom E240 etc blanks for PAL countries that give 4/8 hours or more.

The 1988 service manual I just found for the JVC D320E specifies "2 rotary video heads" & "up to four hours recording time on E240 cassette". So my guess would be this was a single-speed vcr? If so, then my conjecture that the two heads might make speed search look ugly at SP is incorrect (a two head VCR limited to SP mode will be optimized for SP). But if the D320E does have an LP speed option, the two heads would be optimized for LP instead (as they were in similar North American models).

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post #141 of 145 Old 04-04-2017, 09:45 AM
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This is going wayyy back, but when I was in Europe several decades ago I believe the E180 was equivalent to the tape length of our T120(just a tad longer) and the E240 was a similar length to our T160, again a tad longer. Your right about the SLP/EP speed though, I didn't' realize the OP was from Europe, as you said they never had the third speed, they just had their SP and LP(half the speed of SP).
I believe their E180 gave them 3hrs at SP and their E240 gave them 4hrs at SP.
I believe their E180 gave them 6hrs at LP and their E240 gave them 8hrs at LP.

So their SP wasn't as fast(linear speed) as our SP, halfway between our SP and LP and their LP was a similar speed to our SLP/EP. Again this is going back decades so I could stand to be corrected

Even with their speeds I'd think you would want at least a 4 video head machine for decent SP quality, otherwise just using LP heads wouldn't get you much better SP quality than LP. Of course if you just used LP I suppose a 2 head would be OK.
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post #142 of 145 Old 04-04-2017, 12:38 PM
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No PAL is TOO FAST ... I feel bad for people who can only watch PAL stuff (Even DVD,etc) as the speed IS NOT RIGHT


I got THE TERMINATOR (1984) first release on VHS once and they accidenty put the PAL master on that tape instead of the NTSC one and as a result it was TOO FAST.... Totally ruined that beautiful movie....
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post #143 of 145 Old 04-04-2017, 04:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dude111 View Post
I got THE TERMINATOR (1984) first release on VHS once and they accidenty put the PAL master on that tape instead of the NTSC one and as a result it was TOO FAST.... Totally ruined that beautiful movie....
Normal NTSC VCRs will NOT play back PAL tapes.
What kind of a VCR did you play it in? A multi format model that on the fly transfers PAL to NTSC?
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post #144 of 145 Old 04-04-2017, 05:13 PM
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Re vhs heads

I Have a head spec list from Yamagata Mitsumi Co, a company that supplied video heads for most NTSC and PAL VCRs right ‘till the end.

For a PAL 2-speed 2-head 3hr/6hr VCR the replacement heads are 32-micron heads. They grossly under-lap SP and slightly over-lap LP.

For a PAL 2-speed 4-head 3hr/6hr VCR the replacement heads are the full track width 49-micron heads for SP speed and the full track width 25-micron heads for LP speed.

See diagram.



Yamagata Mitsumi Co did not make any NTSC or PAL single speed heads any longer. But my guess is that if the PAL VCR in question is a SP single speed VCR – it probably had two full track 49-micron heads. If it was a 2-speed 2-head VCR it probably had the 32-micron heads.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff View Post
I believe their E180 gave them 3hrs at SP and their E240 gave them 4hrs at SP.
I believe their E180 gave them 6hrs at LP and their E240 gave them 8hrs at LP.
I think the above is what one of my European friends told me long, long ago.

==================
My NTSC JVC 4-head + Hi Fi newer model SVHS VCRs have the 46/58 SP 19/19 EP 28/28 Hi Fi heads as in the Yamagata Mitsumi Co diagram.
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post #145 of 145 Old Today, 03:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Super Eye
Normal NTSC VCRs will NOT play back PAL tapes.
 
Well what I mean to say Super Eye is.. They used the PAL master as a source and converted that to NTSC but the speed was still fast.... (It didnt slow down to the right speed on the tape once converted to NTSC)


I dunno why they didnt fix it....... They must have checked it after they made the original print from the PAL master,why didnt they redo it??


Kinda sad!!
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