Using a US VCR in another country - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 39 Old 05-12-2012, 11:13 PM - Thread Starter
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Ok so i got all excited and bought a JVC 5902 and found the step down transformer i wanted
http://www.tortech.com.au/product/250-watts-step-down/

But then someone told me its not just voltage you need to worry about, its the hz spec too. I looked in the JVC manual and it says 120v~,60hz

So i guess that means 50hz is a no go then? If it was ok with 50hz then ot would say 50hz too?
The link above says

"Does your appliance have a mechanical timing device? If so, how critical is this timing device? If a timing device is included the speed of the device may change due to the frequency change, 60Hz to 50Hz.
"


Is this VCR going to be a total no go then?
can someone with this JVC (SUPER EYE?) check the sticker on the back to see what it says as i am only going by the online manual specs.

I know my Vidicraft proc amp will be ok as it says 50 and 60hz on the back.
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post #2 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 12:02 AM
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I just checked both my JVC VCR stickers and they both say 60Hz and no mention of 50Hz either way.

Wow I kind of thought about this but didn’t say anything cause I thought a step-down would also convert the Hz. Boy was I mistaken. Thanks for the lesson.
I will let the experts chime in but I heard that if the VCR drum motor and and tape transport motor are DC voltage then it doesn’t matter (still clocked at equal to 60Hz AC speed). I believe VCR motors are DC?

Also. Check this.
http://www.voltagesuperstore.com/3faqs.shtml
Quote:


The frequency difference between 60 to 50Hz may cause the motor in a 60Hz appliance to operate slightly slower when used at 50Hz. The frequency difference will also cause analogue clocks that use AC as the timing base to keep incorrect time. The majority of modern electronic equipment, including battery chargers, computers, printers, stereos, tape and CD players, VCR/DVD players, etc. will not be affected by the difference in frequency.

But other links state that you can burn out a 60hz motor real quick feeding it 50hz.
http://www.eng-tips.com/faqs.cfm?fid=1224
Motors: Changing between a 50 and 60Hz supply


I will let the experts give you advice as I don’t know what to say.

Again my VCR stickers say 60Hz and no mention of 50Hz either way.
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post #3 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 01:47 AM - Thread Starter
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Hmmm intersting. Yeah i have heard about the motor speeds and clocks. Unless i know its going to 100% be fine its probably wise to cancel it. Which i would be pretty disapointed about.
AG1980 is both 50/60hz, i read that in the manual.
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post #4 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 01:52 AM
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Yes you better find out for sure.

Someone wrote this on the Internet.
http://forums.creativecow.net/archivethread/24/444154
Quote:


I already have an NTSC VCR which works in EU using a 220v-110v transformer. (That's because the VCR's "innards" are all DC, so the 50hz-60hz doesn't seem to matter.)

My old Beta decks state 50/60hz
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post #5 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 02:07 AM - Thread Starter
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I have read a lot of info on the USA import/220v electrical sites such as World Import etc that supply transformers etc to help US residents relocate to a 220v country and take all their electronics with them but i did not find any information about the frequency differences.
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post #6 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 02:08 AM
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This is from the Service manual of the exact deck.
What does the stuff I highlighted in red mean?

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post #7 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 02:35 AM - Thread Starter
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I dont really know but the US/CAN 'load Z' has a capacitor as well as resistor
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post #8 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 06:17 AM
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The motors in any VCR made in the last 50 years all use DC (direct current) so will not be affected by the difference between 50 and 60 Hz AC power at the plug. AC is immediately converted to a variety of different DC voltages once it enters the VCR (5v, 12v, etc) and the power supplies are designed to do that independent of whether the input is 50 or 60 Hz AC.

The motors mentioned in voltagesuperstore.com's quote above are appliance motors, like blenders, air conditioners, etc. which use motors that run directly from AC voltage. AC motors depend on the frequency of the AC voltage to set the rotational speed so a motor will run slightly slower or faster if it's not made to work on a certain frequency and that could damage say an air conditioner compressor. VCRs and all consumer electronics with a motor use DC motors and run independent of the source AC voltage's frequency.

The only question is whether or not the power supply in that VCR is capable of producing the DC voltages it needs from either the 100-120 volt or the 200-240 volt range. If it can, the label on the back of the VCR would say something like "100-240VAC" which means it can work world-wide and the only thing you need is to put a cheap adapter on the end of the power cord to convert the connector to the local outlet. Electronics manufacturers for years have been building their power supplies to work all over the world, so it's very likely this VCR is built that way, and no step down or step up transformer is even necessary to use it somewhere else.

The specifications table that's shown above has all those AC line voltage ranges listed as valid for that specific model, so I think this is the case. You won't need the transformer, and don't worry about the difference in Hz. Just find yourself the adapter plug for the end of the AC cord. The part of the table circled in red is not applicable to the topic of this discussion at all. It just shows that the wiring of this model meets most common specifications for the amount of measurable stray leakage current that a service tech may encounter inside an opened unit, how that current is typically measured, and that it meets safety standards.

(I'm an electrical engineer in real life and I've done service work on VCRs)
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post #9 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 07:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Super Eye View Post

This is from the Service manual of the exact deck.
What does the stuff I highlighted in red mean?

"Load Z" is for leakage current testing, and is used to simulate the equivalent human body impedance. As scoosdad said, it has no relevance to the voltage/frequency dilemma.

Quote:
Originally Posted by scoosdad View Post

The specifications table that's shown above has all those AC line voltage ranges listed as valid for that specific model, so I think this is the case. You won't need the transformer, and don't worry about the difference in Hz. Just find yourself the adapter plug for the end of the AC cord.

While I agree with basically everything you stated, I think it would be more appropriate for us to review the switching mode power supply schematic to verify that the primary capacitors are up to the task of 230v. If the potential rating is too close to the bone, it would be advisable to use the step down transformer.

Super Eye, if you could post the power supply schematic diagram from that service manual that you have, we could take a look see at it.
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post #10 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 09:35 AM
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I would also error on the side of caution when plugging something rated at 120v into a 220v socket I wouldn't be so worried going the other way(plugging something rated at 220v into our 120v outlet) in that case all you might have would be a dim display or possibly nothing at all. If your device is only built for 120v doubling that is sure to almost instantly burn something out(hopefully just a fuse, possibly worse).
If scoosdad knows for sure or knows similar models that use a auto switching power supply I'd feel more comfortable trying it.

scoosdad, is their a easy way for a laymen to tell if the power supply is auto switching, even by removing the cover? I suppose one way to tell is if the mains fuse is 125v although I believe many times mfgs. use fuses rated for 250v even if only meant for a 120v line. And I'd think most of the capacitors in such a device would be after the conversion from line voltage to low voltage and would be the same rating regardless of input voltage.
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post #11 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 12:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by morc258 View Post

Super Eye, if you could post the power supply schematic diagram from that service manual that you have, we could take a look see at it.

Here is the service manual online.
http://www.scribd.com/doc/57296572/HR-S5912U

I knew the experts would chime in and help out.
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post #12 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 12:13 PM
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Generally speaking, most modern AV devices will have a switched mode power supply as opposed to a linear style.
The linear (old style) typically have a step down transformer, pre-rectification, that is of significant size and commonly located off the circuit board due to its size.
By contrast, the switched style will have one or more relatively small transformers on the circuit board post primary bridge rectification, after the "switching transistors".

Using the fuses "rated voltage" is not an appropriate means of determining the power supplies voltage limitations. The 250v fuse rating, as suggested, can be used in any voltage application below the rated value.

The capacitors in the primary circuit after the primary bridge rectification, are subject to damage if they are not rated to handle the significant potential increase going from 120v to 240v line voltage.
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post #13 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 12:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Super Eye View Post

Here is the service manual online.
http://www.scribd.com/doc/57296572/HR-S5912U

That specific manual does not include the schematics.
It does state that:
Regarding SCHEMATIC DIAGRAMS, refer to the service manual No. 82946 (HR-S2902US).
If anyone can find this particular manual, please post link so it can be reviewed.
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post #14 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 02:59 PM
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morc258
I have a PDF of the ELECTRICAL PARTS LIST but I don’t have an online link and the PDF is too big to include here as a file.

The list lists all capacitors like this:

! C5001 QFZ9072-473 F CAPACITOR 0.047μF,250V
! C5004 QCZ9094-472 CAPACITOR 0.0047μF,125V

C1 NCF21CZ-105X CAPACITOR 1μF,16V
C2 NCF21CZ-105X CAPACITOR 1μF,16V
C3 NCF21CZ-105X CAPACITOR 1μF,16V
C4 NCF21CZ-105X CAPACITOR 1μF,16V
C5 QEKC0JM-476 E CAPACITOR 47μF,6.3V
C6 QCBB1HK-103 CAPACITOR 0.01μF,50V
C7 NDC21HJ-151X CAPACITOR 150pF,50V
C8 NCB21EK-104X CAPACITOR 0.1μF,25V
C9 NCB21HK-103X CAPACITOR 0.01μF,50V
C10 NDC21HJ-151X CAPACITOR 150pF,50V
C11 NCB21EK-104X CAPACITOR 0.1μF,25V
C12 NDC21HJ-7R0X CAPACITOR 7pF,50V
C14 NCB21EK-104X CAPACITOR 0.1μF,25V

Is there any specific capacitor I should look for that could help?
Maybe these
! C5001 QFZ9072-473 F CAPACITOR 0.047μF,250V
! C5004 QCZ9094-472 CAPACITOR 0.0047μF,125V
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post #15 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 03:41 PM - Thread Starter
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Currently i have read up to post #8 at the time of writing post below.

Hi. Thankyou for your reply. I have a 10 year old (about the same age as the JVC in question here) native PAL/220volt region HR-J695 JVC here and it says 110-240v 50/60hz so that means its got a auto switching power supply I guess or can just handle anything in those ranges, and I have also seen some VCRs that have a switch on the back to select 50 or 60hz. From memory some 220/240 regions use 50hz and some use 60hz..

Now the VCR in question is a native US 120v 60z type. It does not say 110-240v or 50/60z. It would definitey need a step down voltage converter. I can do that but I am only going to end up with 110v @ 50hz and not the 60hz as specified by the manual. Does the transformer/rectifier inside the VCR care if its fed 110v 50hz or 110v 60z? can it still make the proper DC voltages inside the VCR from 50 or 60hz?

So the question is if the frequency matters? We have voltage under conrol and as all the insides are running on DC, do you think it would work totally fine and the 50hz input instead of 60hz would not matter at all? I am not going to have any issues? If the frequency is not so critical, why would they specifically 60hz only? It is it just because this VCR was specifically made for US/CAN only and not a worldwide one and the label is just like that to avoid confusing consumers or something?

If all consumer AV electronics like this run with DC inside and are fine with different frequencies, is the 60hz spec more of just a labelling thing?

As I mentioned before some devices such as the US market Panasonic AG1980 VCR which although specified for 110/120v, also has 50 or 60hz in the spec. My Vidicraft proc amp from the 80’s says 115v 50-60hz (also has 12v DC direct input too) so does that mean USA had 50 and 60hz power once upon a time, perhaps up to the late 90’s and that’s why the AG1980 says 120v 50-60hz too? Did things change and now you only have 60hz?

I am thinking this might end up being ok after all. The worst thing that can happen is I end up with a $90 door stop. My only worry is that it plays the tapes at correct speeds and all the electronics inside work correctly producing the correct NTSC output etc..

There was a guy recently in Australia who imported current Panasonic TV from Amazon US (thousands of dollars, big screen plasma etc) All he did was chop the plug off and attach an australian one, actually he had the ‘installer’ do it because the installer said there would be no problems and it would work fine here.. Anyway they blew something up in it and it was a big learning curve for the guy. Think he conned amazon into accepting a return. It was labelled 120v device. So I guess when a US product says 120v 60hz it does really mean it!. If 220v was ok the lable would have shown it as 110-240v. So I am not going to take the risks or make assumptions that this VCR labled 120v only would handle 220v fine because it most likely would not, and I would use a step down for sure.

After reading that table above, it kinda seems confusing. Is that a worldwide JVC service manual or does that mean those specs are found on/in just the US model VCR? To me it seems like the manual is worldwide however I believe most Aus JVC’s has AM suffix I thought and not US or UC? Maybe not though as I checked one (Aus model) here and it is EA. To me it does not seem like all those specs can be found inside a US model. I think each region is different and the serice manual is common to all and when taking measurements of the VCR, you look to the section of the table for the specs in your country and that’s what it should be. If that is specific US service model only, why would they bother giving specs for Europe/Australia if they are not going to get those specs when measuring a US unit? What euro countries use 110-130v? none that I can think of. That is strange.

I also read something about if the device has a timing device (or timing circuit???) that it will be affected by the frequency. Is this also not an issue for a VCR?

Well what you have said has built a case to say its probably going to be ok if just a transformer is used, along with the post by that person in a link above saying the frequency does not matter because all the ‘inards’ are DC in a VCR. Also add in the fact that none of those specialist 110-220v electronic goods sites like World Import, Gandhi appliances etc who speclise in selling transformers and video converters to help Americans prepare to re-locate overseas with their 110v NTSC AV gear, actually mention anything about the 50/60hz difference.

EDIT

Quote:
60Hz transformers will run warmer in a 50Hz delivery system but in saying that it depends on the transformer used. This can be anywhere from negligible to overheating and failure.

They are talking about the transformer inside the VCR

another comment

Quote:
Not a problem. VCR's use switch mode power supplies all the motors inside the VCR are DC powered usually 12V.

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post #16 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 04:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Super Eye View Post

morc258
I have a PDF of the ELECTRICAL PARTS LIST but I don't have an online link and the PDF is too big to include here as a file.

The list lists all capacitors like this:

! C5001 QFZ9072-473 F CAPACITOR 0.047μF,250V
! C5004 QCZ9094-472 CAPACITOR 0.0047μF,125V

C1 NCF21CZ-105X CAPACITOR 1μF,16V
C2 NCF21CZ-105X CAPACITOR 1μF,16V
C3 NCF21CZ-105X CAPACITOR 1μF,16V
C4 NCF21CZ-105X CAPACITOR 1μF,16V
C5 QEKC0JM-476 E CAPACITOR 47μF,6.3V
C6 QCBB1HK-103 CAPACITOR 0.01μF,50V
C7 NDC21HJ-151X CAPACITOR 150pF,50V
C8 NCB21EK-104X CAPACITOR 0.1μF,25V
C9 NCB21HK-103X CAPACITOR 0.01μF,50V
C10 NDC21HJ-151X CAPACITOR 150pF,50V
C11 NCB21EK-104X CAPACITOR 0.1μF,25V
C12 NDC21HJ-7R0X CAPACITOR 7pF,50V
C14 NCB21EK-104X CAPACITOR 0.1μF,25V

Is there any specific capacitor I should look for that could help?
Maybe these
! C5001 QFZ9072-473 F CAPACITOR 0.047μF,250V
! C5004 QCZ9094-472 CAPACITOR 0.0047μF,125V

Without the schematic I can't tell which capacitor goes where. Just judging from the list, the highest value in the list is 250v. I would expect to see a capacitor in the 400v range for the primary, post rectification if it were intended to used at 240VAC.
Peak DC primary voltage will roughly 300v with the 240VAC line input.
There may be ways to put lower voltage rating caps in the circuit, but we really need to see the diagram to make an educated guess.
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post #17 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 04:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclone82 View Post

Does the transformer/rectifier inside the VCR care if its fed 110v 50hz or 110v 60z? can it still make the proper DC voltages inside the VCR from 50 or 60hz?
So the question is if the frequency matters?

The frequency will not be an issue. The voltage may be an issue if you were to hook it up straight to your mains. We will need power supply schematics to be certain. If you use the step down transformer, it will be fine.

The clock will not be an issue due to the fact it is powered on the DC side which will be the same at 50hz or 60hz.

Why they label the machine 60hz only is probably because that specific model was only for North America.
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post #18 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 05:13 PM
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Morc258,
There are couple 1,000-volt capacitors.
C5101 QCZ0212-472 CAPACITOR 0.0047μF,1kV
C5102 QCZ0339-101Z CAPACITOR 100pF,1kV

But I would take morc258's advice and better be safe than sorry and use the step-down.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclone82 View Post

Is that a worldwide JVC service manual or does that mean those specs are found on/in just the US model VCR? To me it seems like the manual is worldwide however I believe most Aus JVC's has AM suffix I thought and not US or UC?

That service manual is specific for USA and Canadian NTSC models thus the Us= equals USA and the Uc =equals Canadian. I don't know of any differences between a Us American and Uc Canadian model.

The general specs in that service manual clearly state Power requirement AC 120
60 Hz Signal system : NTSC-type color signal and EIA monochrome signal, 525 lines/ 60 fields

Why the different power AC line voltage of 110-130 210-240, is in that manual? Good question, that's why I brought it up. Maybe it can take an AC 230 input? Better use the step-down though and you have morc258 and scoosdad telling you should be OK, including Hz not a problem.
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post #19 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 08:17 PM - Thread Starter
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Ok so after reading the other posts it sounds like just a step down is needed. I contacted the manufacturer of the step down transformers in my opening post they said the following when i asked if a VCR would be OK

Quote:


The VCR will work OK, but may suffer a loss of efficiency. The motors should be DC, so will be unaffected.

Not sure what they mean by efficiency?

Did anyone have an answer for my quiry about 50/60hz in USA? The Vidicraft proc amp i have says both but i could not see that they were ever marketed or made for another country, there would not be many if any countries that had 115v 50hz and the proc amp only says 115v 50-60 hz not 110-240v 50-60hz so it was never intended for a 220v region. It just turns out that i need to speak to the maker of the vidicraft gear about something else so i might ask him about that. But it makes me wonder if the USA had 50 and 60hz at one point in time?
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post #20 of 39 Old 05-13-2012, 10:08 PM
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Without the schematic there's no easy way to tell if it's a switching power supply or not. A switching power supply is generally simpler when you look at it visually but you'd need to know what chips it's using to tell for sure.

Not to throw another monkey wrench out there, but what is the intended use of this VCR outside of its native country? I hope you're not expecting to record PAL-encoded signals on it if it's an NTSC unit or vice-versa, or play back tapes on a TV or monitor in the local country which doesn't match the format of the VCR. While some of the current DVD recorders are capable of adapting to either format (NTSC or PAL), VCRs aren't so flexible. Unless this was specifically designed as a mutistandard unit (and if it were, we wouldn't be having these discussions about whether it will work on 240v/50 hz power; it would, and there weren't that many multistandard VCRs made anyway; Samsung had a few), you won't be able to record a PAL signal on it without a standards converter, whether it's from off-air or from a cable box and using composite or s-video. A proc amp won't fix that, either. It doesn't have the smarts to change horizontal and vertical scanning rates and how color information is encoded. So if it's an NTSC VCR, you'll probably also need an NTSC television (or a multistandard television; those are more common than multistandard VCRs) to view anything you've pre-recorded and brought with you.

And this doesn't even get into the discussion about the differences in where off-air signals are in the RF spectrum and how they're encoded over the air in different countries and how that affects the tuner in the VCR. That may be a moot point if you're not going to record anything on it off-air. But simple playback from an NTSC-only VCR to a TV or monitor in another country that can't handle NTSC could be a huge problem.
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post #21 of 39 Old 05-14-2012, 12:59 AM - Thread Starter
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99% of TVs sold outside USA can display NTSC, especially in Australia and especially current TV's. Most are now auto switching. Its been like that for years, which is totally opposite to USA where 99% of your stuff is NTSC only.. There is no issues there. There is also no issues with wanting to record PAL signals RF or AV. My ONLY worry was just the 50/60hz thing. Everything else is irrelevant or i have it 'covered'. Primary use will just be a good deck for playing back NTSC tapes.


Most VCR's sold here could also play NTSC too and i am not taling about those special samsung/panasonics that could play anything and do conversions. Most JVC's and Panasonics sold here could play NTSC but finding decent ones at a good price on the used market here is not easy. Unlike USA where you had everything designed mainly for your market, Australia gets a lot of stuff designed for any format or any system.

People are saying VCR's are dead and not in demand, well i have been looking at whats selling locally and all good brands and decks from the 90's/2000's seem to be selling. If they dont sell the first time, they get re-listed and then sell eventually. Even crappy samsung and LG combo units and decks with no s-video get 10 or 20 bids. Its does not seem like its just top end panny and JVC TBC/DNR s-vhs versions that everyone is after. I have been quite surprised. Even good clean Sharp and Sanyos are selling. Even if its just 20 or 30 bucks, people have been able to offload them to willing buyers on ebay. I don't know what it is, but maybe a lot of people are regretting binning their VCRS around 2002 or something or find DVDRs too complicated.

The proc amp i picked up was just something i found on ebay cheapily that may come in handy latter down the track to fix some poor tapes. They dont have s-video connections but they are well built and have a very good repuation (made in USA too)
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post #22 of 39 Old 05-14-2012, 04:48 AM
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Vidicraft made decent switchers, detailers and proc amps but as you said, most lacked S-video and to your 50/60 Hz question, AFAIK N. America has used 60 Hz since the beginning but I believe Japan has used both??
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post #23 of 39 Old 05-14-2012, 05:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Cyclone82 View Post

Not sure what they mean by efficiency?

Did anyone have an answer for my quiry about 50/60hz in USA?

Well, first off you will lose efficiency just by using a step down transformer. A transformer always has inherent losses mostly dissipated as heat. The VCR power supply may not be as efficient at 50Hz, but it will be negligible.

To answer the question about frequency standards in the U.S., 60Hz has been the standard here since the early 20th century. There were a few vestiges of 50Hz on smaller isolated utilities, but it was rare and ended in the late 40's. If you wanted to be hooked up to the grid, you had to adopt the 60Hz standard.

Our brilliant forefather Nikola Tesla established the foundation of the generation/transmission/distribution systems we use today. That guy was so far ahead of his time it amazes me every time I read about him. If you truly want to be humbled, do a little research about him, you wont be sorry.
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post #24 of 39 Old 05-14-2012, 11:30 AM
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Originally Posted by scoosdad View Post

The motors in any VCR made in the last 50 years all use DC (direct current) so will not be affected by the difference between 50 and 60 Hz AC power at the plug.
(I'm an electrical engineer in real life and I've done service work on VCRs)

The very early Sony Betamax's and some clones like Toshiba and Sanyo used line powered AC motors. I'm talking late 70s models here. One motor did everything via belts and idler wheels. The head servo was done with an eddy current brake and belt slippage.

I'm pretty sure VHS machines never used line operated AC motors. I had a 1980 piano key style Panasonic/Quasar that was all DC motors.

Switching power supplies however were only used from about the mid 1990s. So older decks had 60hz power transformers. Here a simple step down auto transformer is all you need. The 50hz difference won't matter. Just make sure the converter is a true transformer. Many of today's are just passive pin adapters for use with multivoltage power supplies. Then there are the simple diode converters that are meant for non motor devices. These cannot be used with a power transformer either.

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post #25 of 39 Old 05-14-2012, 11:34 AM
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Originally Posted by jjeff View Post

Vidicraft made decent switchers, detailers and proc amps but as you said, most lacked S-video and to your 50/60 Hz question, AFAIK N. America has used 60 Hz since the beginning but I believe Japan has used both??

Yes, Japan is both 50 and 60hz. They also use 100v versus our 120v. This can be an issue with transformer powered devices. They do sell 120v to 100v autotransformers for this purpose.

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Originally Posted by Cyclone82 View Post

But then someone told me its not just voltage you need to worry about, its the hz spec too. I looked in the JVC manual and it says 120v~,60hz

If it's a JVC original deck, it will work.
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post #27 of 39 Old 05-15-2012, 04:29 AM - Thread Starter
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Ah ha, so maybe the Vidicraft gear was sold to Japan and thats why they had 50hz spec too, but as you say they still would have needed to conver 100 to 120v. Well the Vidicraft was labeled 115v

Glimmie - this brand was recommended to me in Australia and 'isolated' as being a better/safer version as the 220v voltage cant jump through to the VCR.
http://www.tortech.com.au/product/250-watts-step-down/
If a company has been making these since the 80's thats good in my books rather than some no name company thats started up in the past 5 years sticking their name on a $10 chinese transformer. Although 100's have been sold of these
http://cgi.ebay.com.au/ws/eBayISAPI....tchlink:top:en
I decided against this and have decided to spend more and a Tortech one.

So i have come to the conclusion i will get this JVC sent out to me. Thats the only way to be sure i guess.

Thanks for the advice and you will sure hear back from me with how it goes.
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Originally Posted by Cyclone82 View Post

So i have come to the conclusion i will get this JVC sent out to me. Thats the only way to be sure i guess. Thanks for the advice and you will sure hear back from me with how it goes.

I really, really, really hope the HR-S5902U works out for you. Otherwise I won't be able to live out the shame and guilt and will have to leave AVS for good, after all the bragging I done about the 5902 /12 series.

I think our friend CitiBear should purchase one or two or three. Shipping to NY will only cost him about $17 for one or $25 for three. If I lived in NY I would buy 3. Although with CitiBear's bad JVC luck if he got lemon decks - he would never let me live it down. Probably would come here with a gun and shoot me.
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post #29 of 39 Old 05-15-2012, 07:06 AM
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Attachment 246648
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclone82 View Post

So i have come to the conclusion i will get this JVC sent out to me. Thats the only way to be sure i guess.

Cyclone, when you get the VCR, can you pop the hood and post a picture of the power supply? If you will, get me the voltage rating on the primary filter capacitor. It will be the largest one on the board. Sometimes they have two. These pics will show you the ones I'm talking about.
LL
LL
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post #30 of 39 Old 05-15-2012, 09:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclone82 View Post

Glimmie - this brand was recommended to me in Australia and 'isolated' as being a better/safer version as the 220v voltage cant jump through to the VCR.
http://www.tortech.com.au/product/250-watts-step-down/
If a company has been making these since the 80's thats good in my books rather than some no name company thats started up in the past 5 years sticking their name on a $10 chinese transformer. Although 100's have been sold of these
http://cgi.ebay.com.au/ws/eBayISAPI....tchlink:top:en
I decided against this and have decided to spend more and a Tortech one.

So i have come to the conclusion i will get this JVC sent out to me. Thats the only way to be sure i guess.

Thanks for the advice and you will sure hear back from me with how it goes.

Yes, that's a good unit. It is a true transformer versus an autotransformer that only has one winding.

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