DVD VCR Recoder Player W/ Digital tuner ? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 55 Old 07-09-2012, 12:02 PM - Thread Starter
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As Simple as I can make it . I'm looking for a unit which I can transfer MY VHS tapes an burn too DVD , yet still record OTA , so it needs a digital tuner , then record in either either of the format , does such an animal exist ?.

I would prefer a stand alone product rather than Video capture too my computer or dubbing from old VCR . Thanks in advance .
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post #2 of 55 Old 07-09-2012, 01:25 PM
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Unfortunately there is no longer any single standalone box that is optimized for both VHS dubbing and off-air recording: you kind of need to make a choice about what your priority recording task will be. And unless you don't see yourself recording a TV show more than once or twice a week, you'll probably need to re-think your preference for a single box, "no thanks to the separate VCR" preference.

The elephant in the DVD recorder room most consumers failed to grasp is that DVD is primarily a computer data disc designed to be recorded at high speed from a digital file on a hard disk drive (HDD). Early on, mfrs tried to keep recorder prices down by offering DVD and DVD/VHS models without the HDD feature, only to have consumers hate the very thought of using such machines two days after buying them. A DVD recorder without HDD is a big PITA to use for everyday recording, and that goes double for VHS dubbing.

If you only have a few VHS to dub, or you can truthfully say you really don't care at all how funky the DVD copies turn out, then yes you can get away using a DVD/VHS combo without HDD (there are no other combos available anyway: there used to be a handful of DVD/HDD/VHS triple combos, but none survived to the ATSC digital tuner era). Same goes for the off-air TV recording: if you are a VERY casual recordist, don't particularly care how the DVDs turn out, don't plan on starting a DVD library, and don't record enough to care about convenience features, you can probably make do with a DVD/VHS recorder.

But they aren't ideal for anything more than minimal occasional use. If you record things on a regular basis, hold off and wait until this fall when Magnavox should be releasing updates of its currently-sold-out DVD/HDD recorder. If you have been reading these forums at all, you already know most of us here consider the Magnavox with HDD the only DVD recorder with digital tuner worth bothering with. All the remaining DVD/VHS combos are sold out, discontinued old stock, or overpriced and crawling with bugs and design flaws. You'll be happier with a DVD/HDD Magnavox paired with a separate VCR you pick up for $20 second hand.

I can certainly understand your preference for the single-box DVD/VHS: we all start out thinking that must be the perfect recorder. When I began my huge project of dubbing VHS to DVD, I bought a half dozen JVC DVD/VHS recorders thinking they would be a cinch. But I was quickly proven wrong, and after trying a couple other DVD/VHS brands I followed the advice here to get DVD/HDD recorders and use a separate VCR. The DVD/VHS combos tend to be cheaply made with crummy VCRs, and the dubbing features are so crude as to be near-useless unless all of your tapes contain just one movie or TV show. The tuner/timer combined with direct-to-DVD recording bugs can lead these machines to shut down or refuse to record a variety of TV shows off air. Lastly, if the VHS tapes you need to dub are commercial Hollywood movies you bougfht years ago, forget it: the combo units will flat out refuse to copy them. You need to add a copy-restriction filter box between the VCR and DVD recorder, and that is impossible with DVD/VHS combos because of their internal wiring.

If you absolutely must have the combo, the only ones without major defects are the Toshiba DR570 or JVC DR-MV150B. These were recently discontinued and can fetch close to $400 when you find them. Earlier models (DR560, DR-MV100B) are very similar and may be cheaper on the overstock or second-hand market (try eBay). At all costs, avoid the Panasonic EZ-48v and EZ-485v: these seem very attractive but have a mountain of problem reports from AVS members.
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post #3 of 55 Old 07-09-2012, 03:05 PM - Thread Starter
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Based upon the information You've graciously provided , I'm now forced to rethink my original simple plan and begin queries of what's best ?.

Do you remember professional 1.0 and .750 " tape , well if you do I transferred hundreds of those onto .500 VHS format and in addition too those I also have several hundred .500 commercial VHS that I now need too convert YEP onto DVD format !.

That is my #1 priority , the capability of recording OTA regardless of format used is for the Wife , TV isn't my thing especially the last 10 years Way too much reality dance & sing know nothing nonsense Big Brother mindless time lapse programing . ( some people actually wonder how our Country can spend as much money as the top #6 Countries on Education , yet rank 17 Th. in the World ; Turn on the TV and wonder NO MORE )

Is there a High speed dubbing process from VHS too DVD ,which is affordable ?. I have extra computers lying around that I could dedicate too the task via some type of capture setup sending files onto the HD .

Or as You suggested earlier should I just WAIT for Magnavox ?. Now for the Wife's request : Recording OTA onto DVR or re writable DVD unit with a ATSC tuner .

I have a Home Theater W/ Blu Ray and 7.1 custom sound set up for our movies , she has an additional LED Samsung TV she watches .

Keeps peace within the confines of matrimony . Thanks for all the suggestions as I'm not up on latest greatest Electronic wizardry and admit it up front .
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post #4 of 55 Old 07-09-2012, 03:22 PM - Thread Starter
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CitiBear : I just read a post you did back in 2011 on VHS DVD dubbing and it's primarily DVD HDD Maggie , assuming that's Magnavox any particular model or is that what I'm now awaiting ??. One should really READ before pandering . Thanks
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post #5 of 55 Old 07-09-2012, 03:32 PM
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Between the hundreds of VHS needing to be dubbed, and the wife being the primary OTA user, I would say you DEFINITELY should reconsider, and opt for the DVD/HDD recorder and separate VCR. You will need such a setup in order to add the necessary copy-restrict filter box for the commercial tapes, and the HDD feature makes trimming and arranging the VHS dubs much easier. Perhaps the most important aspect of the HDD is capacity: it can hold about 120 hours of video at the standard SP recording speed. This means you can accumulate the contents of up to 60 VHS tapes, then mix and match pieces or edit out bad spots at your leisure. As a bonus, HDD recording is much easier for the wife than using DVDs: you never run out of space, never need to scrounge for a blank, and when she's done watching something she can just delete it with no hassles (or you can save it to a DVD if she wants to keep it).

Regarding your "high speed" question, there has never been a consumer or semi-pro product that could dub a VHS tape to digital faster than "real time." There's no way around it: a two hour VHS will take two hours to dub. When using a DVD/HDD unit, you'll want to allow a few minutes for any edits you might want to make, and then it takes about twelve minutes to burn the DVD. So figure each two hour VHS will take two and a half hours to digitize. If you feel this is really tedious, and are willing to spend money to speed things up, you can do what some of us crazies do: double up on the gear. If you can afford it, buy two or three DVD/HDD recorders and VCRs (dubbing more than three tapes simultaneously gets very difficult- we humans can only handle so much multitasking). You would be surprised at the extent used DVD/HDD recorders hold their value: when you finish your dubbing project, you can probably resell the extra recorders on eBay at only a slight $ loss.

Given that you have hundreds of tapes, many of which are commercial, you might actually want two recorders short term anyway: one for your wife to record TV with, and one that you can leave connected to a VCR and whatever filter you might need. It is unknown just what the price will be on the new Magnavoxes, but previous model MDR513 has been consistently available for $169 as a like-new "refurb" from J&R over the last couple years. These deals rarely pop up anymore but are expected to resume as soon as the new models come out (there's always a large number of people who buy the Magnavox thinking they're gonna somehow cheat their cable company- they end up discovering that ain't gonna fly, so they return the new recorder and it gets moved into the refurb pipeline). Bookmark this J&R recorder page and check it once a week to see if any more Magnavox 513s show up: if you see one, grab it. And check back here every so often until you see it announced that the new Magnavox models are available (believe me, there will be ten threads about it- no way you'll miss it).

The current, just-discontinued Magnavox models were MDR513 and MDR515, sometimes they still turn up. The new upcoming Magnavox recorders are tentatively thought to be MDR533, MDR535, and MDR537. All three seem to be the same as the previous 515 model, the only difference being HDD capacity (320, 500, or 1000 GB). They will at first be available only via WalMart website, at approx $229 and up. After a a few weeks the returns/refurbs may start appearing at J&R website.
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post #6 of 55 Old 07-09-2012, 04:08 PM
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post #7 of 55 Old 07-10-2012, 04:04 PM - Thread Starter
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Will any working VCR handle the transfer task ?. I've got a couple of NIB Magnavox's I purchased from Costco years back for cheap , so as You suggested DVDR/HDD is in order .

Phillips sent the info on this unit , an I realize it''s NOT HDD , as I could find no reference . Again Many Thanks , I'm never disappointed visiting this site as Knowledgeable People make the World of AVS connectivity a reality .

Unit / Philips DVD recorder/VCR DVDR3545V
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post #8 of 55 Old 07-10-2012, 04:15 PM
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Any VCR with A/V outputs would work, although some VCRs will last longer than others, some have better noise reduction/tracking/etc., some are stereo/HiFi and others aren't, so some VCRs are better choices than others. It depends on how big your project is and how picky you'll be about the end result.

If you have more than one VCR, I recommend spreading the work out between them so you're not putting the entire load on one, especially if you have hundreds of tapes.

Don't believe everything on the Interwebz! A duck's quack DOES echo!
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post #9 of 55 Old 07-10-2012, 04:37 PM
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I also suggest a twin configuration "studio" for your project:

2 MDR513/515 Maybe you want to wait until 533/535/537 arrives
2 Reliable HI-FI VHS Go for Panasonic
1 Copyright filter box At least
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post #10 of 55 Old 07-10-2012, 05:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DocCarbon View Post

Will any working VCR handle the transfer task ?. I've got a couple of NIB Magnavox's I purchased from Costco years back for cheap

Most any VCR will give you passable results. If your NIB Magnavox VCRs are from at least ten years ago, they're probably pretty good, but if they're just a couple years old they may not be great. Parts quality declined after 1999 for Philips/Magnavox VCRs.

Quote:
Phillips sent the info on this unit , an I realize it''s NOT HDD , as I could find no reference.
Unit / Philips DVD recorder/VCR DVDR3545V

It isn't clear what you're asking: is this the NIB VCR you got from CostCo a few years ago? Or did you contact Philips/Magnavox for info, and their clunky marketing department sent you info on this discontinued model from 2008? If this is the VCR you already have, you could try it and see what happens. This model is not known for reliability or good VCR performance, but since you already own it theres no harm checking if the results will please you. Odds are it wont be durable enough to play hundreds of tapes, though.

The question of which VCR to use for digitizing VHS gets real complicated, real fast, depending on how "picky" you are about picture quality. The majority of VCRs made after 1996 have very different playback from earlier models, and the change was not for the better in most cases. The video output on newer VCRs is grainy and noisy compared to older models, making the DVD copies look kind of blah. There isn't much you can do to make it better unless you have a lot of time and a lot of skill with PC video tools.

Without a PC intervention, you're limited to simply changing VCRs in the hope one will play better than another. There are some "affordable" VCRs that are much better than average in reliability and slightly better at playback (you'd need to check Craigs List or eBay because they're all discontinued). As a short list, you could look for JVC HR-S5912 (or any 3900 or 5900 model), Quasar VHQ860 or 960, Panasonic PV-4520 or 4521, or any Sharp 4-head HiFi model. These usually go for $30 or less. In the $40-$50 range, look for a Panasonic AG-2560 or Mitsubishi HS-U448 or 449.

For quite a bit more money, you can get noticeable improvements (depending on the tape) by using a deluxe SVHS or DVHS model with the TBC/DNR feature. These have special circuits that clear up the usual graininess and color noise. But these fancy VCRs can be a tricky purchase for multiple reasons. They tend to run $99-399 depending on condition and model, and if you don't want repair headaches you're talking closer to $400 than $100 for a serviced VCR or newer model. The most popular deluxe VCRs are the Panasonic AG-1980 and various JVC SVHS models like HR-S9911, but their popularity means they've changed hands several times and you're likely to get one that needs expensive service. The picture improvement circuits backfire about 50% of the time, causing artifacts you don't want. For someone who is very picky about PQ and is willing to tolerate risk of ongoing expense, the TBC/DNR models do offer significant benefits. Just be aware it comes at a high cost in $$$ and aggravation.

Also bear in mind that in the not-too-distant future, all our efforts to make the "perfect" VHS dubs will come to naught. Digitized VHS only really looks decent on a classic CRT television like Sony Trinitron, the minute you play it on a flat screen LCD it all goes to hell. Flat screens are optimized for HDTV signals, so are barely adequate for VHS. If you don't own a flat screen now, you probably will in a couple years. A good 32" LCD is about the limit for tolerable playback of digitized VHS, but good 32" sets are vanishing in favor of chintzy budget models and ever-larger screens. The typical 42" -50" screen popular today looks awful playing digitized VHS unless you sit a football field away. Complicating this is the steady disappearance of DVD players in favor of BluRay players, which aren't that great at DVD playback and tend to lock themselves into distorted widescreen formatting of DVDs made from VHS.

I don't say all this to scare you, DocCarbon, but to give some perspective. A lot of people put staggering effort and expense into their VHS transfers, which is fine if they enjoy it, but you can't count on the results being stable due to insanely rapid changes in display and player technology. What looks good on today's TV may look horrible on tomorrow's, although things may improve now that advanced OLED screen technology is finally headed toward reasonable prices. Personally, I've been pulling my hair out with unreliable high-end VCRs: the repair frequency and expense is killing me. The TBC/DNR feature seems helpful until I play my discs on other people's TVs and it makes my eyes bleed: once you hit a certain screen size, you can't tell a DVD made with a $400 VCR from a DVD made with a $20 VCR (they both look... sad). Have realistic expectations, and you won't be disappointed.
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post #11 of 55 Old 07-10-2012, 06:38 PM
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Once you have your VHS tapes digitized and transferred to DVDRs, you should look into using the computer program Fairuse Wizard to convert the DVDR video to XviD format. You need a computer with a pretty fast CPU (Intel i3 or AMD A6) to do the conversion in a reasonable amount of time, but the results will make the effort worthwhile. With Fairuse Wizard you can crop the edges of the image screen to delete the VHS VBI ribbon at the bottom of the picture and any noise defects on the borders, You can edit out material at the start and end of the video file and can also selectively convert to XviD parts of the DVDR video. Once you have the XviD files made, you can also convert them back to DVD format using another program, ConvertXtoDVD. There is a freeware program called CCE (for closed caption extractor) that enables you to extract closed captions from VOB files and convert them to srt subtitles. .Avi files in DivX or XviD format are playable on many DVD players and these files can be stored on hard drives or USB flash drives. On sale at newegg, a Wintec 16 GB USB flash drive costs $10. That's over 20 hours storage of high quality (over 1,300 kb/sec) video files. The new Samsung Galaxy S3 can play back XviD videos you store on its microSD card. Copying XviD files is easy, a copy and paste operation from one hard drive to another. The main fly in the ointment is that it takes time to convert DVD files to XviD, and the files cannot be copy protected. Not a problem for most users of XviD and .264 video files, users who go to torrent download sites to get the latest TV shows already converted to .avi (e.g. XviD) format.
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post #12 of 55 Old 07-11-2012, 03:32 PM - Thread Starter
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CitiBear : Or did you contact Philips/Magnavox for info, and their clunky marketing department sent you info on this discontinued model from 2008? I

YES !.

CitiBear: I don't say all this to scare you, DocCarbon, but to give some perspective.

Which is greatly appreciated . I'm never fearful until my wallet comes out , then it's did I do enough research ask the correct questions am I sure that's the proper model Etc.

The more the industry focuses on I pads phones portable movie theaters w/ screens the size of a cheap timex , the less I believe in connectivity !.

At this point I'm convinced to simply await the latest and greatest DVDR/HDD W/ Digital tuner , an then consider my VHS dubbing afterwords either a smoke dream or a crap shoot ,

as I was at least hoping to clean and scale VHS up 1080p DVD . I understand and wasn't under the illusion of producing Blu Ray quality DVD's from VHS but with today's technological

advancements I assumed some Electronic Corp giant would have it up an running . Well assumption is the mother of all screw ups as they say !.

An as CitiBear pointed out CRT screen ? I donated My Trinitron too a friend two weeks back , as all of our monitors are LED Hi Res Samsung units .

As yet have never played any of my VHS tapes on the LED . I'll prepare myself for disappointment tonight with a few cocktail tranquilizers !!.
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post #13 of 55 Old 07-11-2012, 04:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DocCarbon View Post

At this point I'm convinced to simply await the latest and greatest DVDR/HDD W/ Digital tuner , an then consider my VHS dubbing afterwords either a smoke dream or a crap shoot , as I was at least hoping to clean and scale VHS up 1080p DVD . I understand and wasn't under the illusion of producing Blu Ray quality DVD's from VHS but with today's technological advancements I assumed some Electronic Corp giant would have it up an running .

While it would be impossible to scale VHS up to truly modern 1080p quality, you can produce some amazing digital transfers if you have time, skill, and money for the necessary hardware/software. I have seen some astounding VHS transfers done by expert technicians, far beyond my own meager abilities (and limited patience). But pulling it off requires a heavy duty PC video system, various outboard processors and quite a bit more time per tape than using a DVD/HDD recorder. There's no shortcut: the choice is between efficiency in processing a large tape collection with passable results, or making it your lifes work to obtain the best results possible.

Quote:
I donated My Trinitron too a friend two weeks back , as all of our monitors are LED Hi Res Samsung units .
As yet have never played any of my VHS tapes on the LED . I'll prepare myself for disappointment tonight with a few cocktail tranquilizers !!.

You may have gotten lucky here. Samsungs run about 50/50: half the models are surprisingly good displaying VHS and standard-def TV, and half are really awful at it. The better Samsungs with LED backlight tend to be fairly decent for VHS, esp the 1080p models. They aren't as accurate as a Trinitron, but they err in the direction of propping up VHS rather than making it worse. You may notice some issues with motion smear, but this varies by tape. If the set has motion smoothing features, you may need to adjust or activate/deactivate them.
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post #14 of 55 Old 07-11-2012, 06:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CitiBear View Post

While it would be impossible to scale VHS up to truly modern 1080p quality, you can produce some amazing digital transfers if you have time, skill, and money for the necessary hardware/software. I have seen some astounding VHS transfers done by expert technicians, far beyond my own meager abilities (and limited patience). But pulling it off requires a heavy duty PC video system, various outboard processors and quite a bit more time per tape than using a DVD/HDD recorder. There's no shortcut: the choice is between efficiency in processing a large tape collection with passable results, or making it your lifes work to obtain the best results possible.

Just 10 years ago a processor with similar quality and I/O interface of this baby would of cost you $100,000. Today it can be had for $2,000 thanks to Black Magic.
95
77
You can hook up this processor between your VHS VCR and DVD recorder and use it as an I/O tweaker cool.gif or you can hook it up between your VHS deck and a PC for more complex editing. Read the 6 short pages to see what you can do.
http://www.blackmagic-design.com/products/teranex/

Although this will get you some of the best VHS conversions possible – it’s still a far cry from true HD quality. Never the less it’s a “lot of toy” for $2,000.
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post #15 of 55 Old 07-12-2012, 05:05 AM
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At present, the number one video format worldwide to upload or download larger video files is the .avi file format XviD. XviD and its kindred video format .264 use the ffdshow media encoder to create mpeg-4 files. IMHO, XviD files made from DVDR recordings have the major advantage of being easily transferable as digital files. The video quality of the XviD files is at least as good as the original DVDR source and you can play the file on a computer using programs like VLC media player freeware. It is amazing that there is virtually no news on XviD video anywhere in the mainstream news, almost as if someone issued a "D" type notice to news media telling them to censor any stories on XviD video technology. For anyone interested in backing up their DVD archives, converting to XviD is a time-consuming way to achieve that goal. Unlike DVDRs, XviD files have no dye layer that can get scratched or bruised, messing up playback. Just remember to stay away from EMPs.
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post #16 of 55 Old 07-12-2012, 08:23 AM
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At present, the number one video format worldwide to upload or download larger video files is the .avi file format XviD. XviD and its kindred video format .264 use the ffdshow media encoder to create mpeg-4 files. IMHO, XviD files made from DVDR recordings have the major advantage of being easily transferable as digital files. The video quality of the XviD files is at least as good as the original DVDR source and you can play the file on a computer using programs like VLC media player freeware. It is amazing that there is virtually no news on XviD video anywhere in the mainstream news, almost as if someone issued a "D" type notice to news media telling them to censor any stories on XviD video technology. For anyone interested in backing up their DVD archives, converting to XviD is a time-consuming way to achieve that goal. Unlike DVDRs, XviD files have no dye layer that can get scratched or bruised, messing up playback. Just remember to stay away from EMPs.

Gerry, I think a lot of people would dispute those claims. AVI is a 20yr old Microsoft container format with lots of limitations in today's world of modern codecs that use predictive compression algorithms, i.e. MPEG-4. Its widespread use died years ago with the introduction of modern codecs and modern container formats needed to support those codecs. MKV containers are now the most pervasive Internet and home archivist container format -- along with .m2ts which is the native BDMV or AVCHD container format. Similarly the Xvid codec is pretty much dead. Xvid is based on "MPEG-4 level-2 advanced simple profile (ASP)" and has long been supplanted by H.264/AVC based on "MPEG-4 level-10 advanced video codec (AVC)" -- 90% of all BluRays are encoded with H.264/AVC. MPEG-4 level-2 is now only used for really low-end home-user encodes like viewing video on your cell phone (MOV, MP4, M4V). If that is the goal, you can go for it with MPEG-4/ASP and be happy. I'm sure there are lots of people with young eyes willing to squint at a 3-4" smart-phone screen while riding the subway and I doubt you could tell the difference between a DVD vs. VCR recording on a cell phone. People/archivists who want to re-encode their SD video captures (DVD recorder output) to save space on a HDD or optical media, while keeping the same PQ level, will encode their recordings to H.264/AVC at 30% reduction (70% of original file size) and save as MKV (for single titles that will only be stored on and played from a HDD) or .m2ts -- also for single titles on a HDD like MKV, but with the ability to author .m2ts titles into a BD-Video structure and burn onto BD-R.

Personally, I see no reason to recode my MPEG-2 recordings to H.264/AVC. Just cutting out the commercials with Video ReDo and saving as an .m2ts file reduces the file size by at least 30%. With >8TB of network storage, I'm not pressed for disk space and when I do archive to optical media I burn to BD-R so I'm not too concerned with trying to pack an extra episode on the disk. People still recording in SD at SP mode typically fuss and fuss to pack 3 edited "1 hr" episodes on a single DVD-R -- you can easily put 14-15 on a single BD-R without fussing -- put a whole 22 episode network series season on two BD-R; most 10-12 episode cable series could fit on 1 BD-R.

- kelson h

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post #17 of 55 Old 07-12-2012, 09:11 AM
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In re-reading this thread, I'm surprised to see I haven't mentioned the Panasonic alternatives to the Magnavox recorders. I may have focused too much on your first post, DocCarbon, which mentioned needing the digital tuner to record off-air TV.

If you eventually decide to go the route of buying two systems (one for the wife to record TV, and one to dedicate to your tape transfers), I would recommend you look into the Panasonic DMR-EH59. This is a "global import" DVD/HDD recorder that costs roughly $349 from respected dealers like B&H Photo Video. The basic design is similar to the Magnavox, but with many more subtle adjustments and handy convenience features that make tape dubbing more flexible and productive. You do sacrifice the tuner capability, as the Panasonic can only record North American video signals via line input (external tuner box or VCR). But you don't use the tuner when dubbing VHS, and the EH59 is distinctly more pleasant to use for editing and titling than the Magnavox.

Six years ago, during the limited heyday of DVD/HDD recorders, we had a choice of sophisticated feature-laden models from Panasonic, Pioneer, Sony, and Toshiba. Each of these had certain advantages for different users, for example Super Eye and myself are big fans of the late lamented Pioneer/Sony design. But most Americans rejected the $449-499 pricetags, and once the looming expense of updating to DTV tuners threatened to jack the prices up to $599 all the major brands dropped DVD/HDD in USA by 2007. The only brand that dared add ATSC tuning to a DVD/HDD recorder was Phillips /Magnavox, which has been the lone proponent of DVD/HDD in USA/Canada since 2008.

While a great many of us here are grateful to Magnavox for keeping the DVD/HDD concept alive and available during the DTV era, there are problems with effectively having only a single model to choose. The Magnavox was engineered to reach an astoundingly low price point other mfrs had been unable to match (which is why they withdrew from the market). This remarkable affordability is a double-edged sword: its wonderful if the Magnavox exactly suits your needs, but is not so wonderful if you need somewhat more capability. To reach its low price, the Magnavox was optimized more towards what your wife would need: day-to-day convenience for recording and erasing TV shows. The excellent off-air widescreen ATSC tuner and HDD with multi-feature record/playback make the Magnavox ideal for this type of use, while still having basic capability for occasional VHS dubbing work. But it falls down a bit for dubbing a large collection of tapes, where you'll often want to do things like edit, re-arrange, add title names and thumbnails for the DVD menu, etc. This is all very much easier and more convenient with the Panasonic DMR-EH59, so if you can possibly afford it I'd recommend you use that for your tape dubbing project and also get a Magnavox for convenient everyday TV recording of off-air programming (the Panasonic has no tuner: you would need a cable/satellite box or external ATSC box to feed it a TV signal when not dubbing VHS). The DMR-EH59 is the closest thing still available new to the Pioneer/Sony DVD/HDD favored by Super Eye, myself, and other old hands at VHS dubbing.
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post #18 of 55 Old 07-12-2012, 09:51 AM
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CitiBear, some new information (bad news, but not unexpected) confirming your earlier statements about the international Panasonics has come to my attention. See the new thread I'm starting about it.

Luke

Evil is charming and beautiful. It makes you doubt yourself. It asks for one small compromise after another until it whittles you down, and it functions best when no one believes in it.-JOA
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Originally Posted by Kelson View Post

Similarly the Xvid codec is pretty much dead. Xvid is based on "MPEG-4 level-2 advanced simple profile (ASP)" and has long been supplanted by H.264/AVC based on "MPEG-4 level-10 advanced video codec (AVC)" -- 90% of all BluRays are encoded with H.264/AVC. MPEG-4 level-2 is now only used for really low-end home-user encodes like viewing video on your cell phone (MOV, MP4, M4V).

Kelson, your points about mkv and .264 image quality being superior to XviD video are correct. Still, if you go to any torrent indexing site, I think you will still find that XviD files are the predominant videos available for download. XviD files have the same compatibility as DivX files, a plus if you do not feel like getting a WD media player or similar such device. In my situation, I am converting a lot of old VHS recordings transferred to DVDRs. The resolution on the original VHS recordings is not good enough to take advantage of the higher video range of the mkv format. My main point was not to say XviD made super duper video files but that in converting video on DVD to a digital format like XviD, you are in effect creating redundancy in your video collection by storing the videos in another digital format. If I wanted, I could encode the video in .264 format but I prefer to use XviD, which is a codec that devices like my Philips Blu-ray player can play through the USB port. But, as they say, different strokes for different folks.
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post #20 of 55 Old 07-12-2012, 11:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DocCarbon View Post

As Simple as I can make it . I'm looking for a unit which I can transfer MY VHS tapes an burn too DVD , yet still record OTA , so it needs a digital tuner , then record in either either of the format , does such an animal exist ?.
I would prefer a stand alone product rather than Video capture too my computer or dubbing from old VCR . Thanks in advance .
You have now gotten a lot of information and equipment ideas. Just a suggestion: put all the pieces together and add up the price tags; then compare that to the cost of just getting a Hauppauge capture device for your PC. You will never beat the flexibility of a PC for fixing video streams, editing, authoring and burning.

If you just want to keep your wife happy, buy her a Magnavox -- but if you really want to make your wife happy, buy her a TiVo.

- kelson h

The bitterness of poor quality lasts long after the sweetness of the low price is forgotten . . . life is too short to drink bad wine

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post #21 of 55 Old 07-12-2012, 11:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Church AV Guy View Post

CitiBear, some new information (bad news, but not unexpected) confirming your earlier statements about the international Panasonics has come to my attention. See the new thread I'm starting about it.

Thanks for that info, ChurchAVGuy: I have replied in the new thread you started:

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1419940/panasonic-international-model-dvd-recorders-eh59-69-availability#post_22212853
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post #22 of 55 Old 07-18-2012, 02:36 PM - Thread Starter
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Many thanks too ALL of you as I've now as mentioned "gotten a lot of information " an all worthwhile . Seems it will be a Hauppauge capture device for My PC's ,as I have burners in them and those models are XP Pro OS . I'm holding out with anticipation of those Magnavox The new upcoming Magnavox recorders are tentatively thought to be MDR533, MDR535, and MDR537..

Does anyone know for certain they're actually coming out , is there any way of finding out or a place to inquire within the trade so to speak ?.
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post #23 of 55 Old 07-18-2012, 04:00 PM
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At this point, there have been enough official statements about the follow-on models, from the manufacturer, that it is ALMOST a certainty that they will be available sometime in the next few months.

Luke

Evil is charming and beautiful. It makes you doubt yourself. It asks for one small compromise after another until it whittles you down, and it functions best when no one believes in it.-JOA
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post #24 of 55 Old 07-18-2012, 05:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DocCarbon View Post

Seems it will be a Hauppauge capture device for My PC's . . . . The new upcoming Magnavox recorders are tentatively thought to be MDR533, MDR535, and MDR537.. Does anyone know for certain they're actually coming out.
Once you get used to the flexibility of the Hauppauge, you won't care, you won't go back.


Geeze -- I just realized I've been on this board for 8 years now. That's a lot of water under the bridge.

- kelson h

The bitterness of poor quality lasts long after the sweetness of the low price is forgotten . . . life is too short to drink bad wine

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post #25 of 55 Old 07-19-2012, 10:24 AM
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Quote:
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Geeze -- I just realized I've been on this board for 8 years now. That's a lot of water under the bridge.
I joined about four months after you. Yes, there has been a lot of water under the bridge. The DVD recorder market sure has changed since Dec 2004. I see your posting rate is about double mine!rolleyes.gif

Luke

Evil is charming and beautiful. It makes you doubt yourself. It asks for one small compromise after another until it whittles you down, and it functions best when no one believes in it.-JOA
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post #26 of 55 Old 07-22-2012, 10:49 AM
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Just 10 years ago a processor with similar quality and I/O interface of this baby would of cost you $100,000. Today it can be had for $2,000 thanks to Black Magic.
95
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Look at that:

HDMI Video Input 1 x HDMI type A connector including 3D frame packing support!

http://www.blackmagic-design.com/products/teranex/techspecs/

eek.gifeek.gifeek.gifeek.gifeek.gif
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post #27 of 55 Old 07-23-2012, 02:21 PM - Thread Starter
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Well a couple of things came up and a slight variation in the short term plan , although I don't see this effecting my overall plan .

Was sorting through some of my unopened Electronic boxes and found New Sony SLV-N500 Hi Fi 4 head VHS player recorder .

Saw as good a deal as I could find on a Magnavox MDR513H/F7 HDD and DVD Recorder with Digital Tuner , So I purchased it . Waiting for delivery now .

So I'll wire up those units for the Wife and while I'm at it transfer a couple of my VHS tapes onto MDR513 an see how they look burned .

Anyone know right off hand where the deals are on Hauppauge capture device ?. I'll post back in a week or so after the unit gets here and hooked up and

give thumbs up or ?. Thanks again to ALL of You ....
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post #28 of 55 Old 07-23-2012, 02:35 PM
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Your wife will prob. enjoy titles on her recorded shows, which with a 513 will require a FW update to SuperFW 727V, as described here.

 

Setting timer programs and adding titles are described here (2 subjects).

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post #29 of 55 Old 07-23-2012, 07:00 PM
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  1. Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kelson View Post

    ...Geeze -- I just realized I've been on this board for 8 years now. That's a lot of water under the bridge. [6961 Posts]
    .
  2. Quote:
    Originally Posted by Church AV Guy View Post

    I joined about four months after you. Yes, there has been a lot of water under the bridge. The DVD recorder market sure has changed since Dec 2004. I see your posting rate is about double mine!rolleyes.gif [3941 Posts]
.
I'll stick with my original SIG LINE from when I joined in 2001 (the NEW Forum Software removed the formatting):
.
Quote:
Low Post Count <> Low Knowledge ergo High Post Count <> High Knowledge
.
I currently have 1578 posts in ~11 years. In comparison, some who joined in 2005 now have over 12,000 posts. Go figure! rolleyes.gif Thus, I don't pay much attention to TOTAL POST COUNT tongue.gif - just CONTENT! biggrin.gif

Also, others would rather post the *SAME* answer REPEATEDLY to multiple Newbies rather than create a FAQ and put the LINK in their SIG LINE. Over the past decade, I estimate that I've created AT LEAST a DOZEN FAQs on multiple forums. cool.gif

Low Post Count <> Low Knowledge ergo High Post Count <> High Knowledge

ClearToLand's Picks For Best Answers to Common ReplayTV Questions

Remember, it's only TV...
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post #30 of 55 Old 07-23-2012, 08:12 PM
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Originally Posted by ClearToLand View Post

I currently have 1578 posts in ~11 years. In comparison, some who joined in 2005 now have over 12,000 posts. Go figure! rolleyes.gif Thus, I don't pay much attention to TOTAL POST COUNT tongue.gif - just CONTENT! biggrin.gif
I said nothing about post count. I was merely reflecting that maintaining an 8 yr association is a significant period of time in CE lifecycles -- and my own lifecycle. I started out recording analog OTA with a Panasonic E85 at a time when burning DVD-R was a not ready-for-primetime experience. I look at the technology progression over the years and where I ended up today -- digital HD/5.1 recording, burning to BD-R and network streaming.

- kelson h

The bitterness of poor quality lasts long after the sweetness of the low price is forgotten . . . life is too short to drink bad wine

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