Toshiba D-R560 Help Needed - AVS Forum

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DVD Recorders (Standard Def)

Guitarstar's Avatar Guitarstar
08:32 AM Liked: 10
post #1 of 8
07-14-2014 | Posts: 73
Joined: Jan 2002
I just bought a used Toshiba D-R560 to allow me to transfer some old VHS tapes to DVD's. I know I can record straight to a DVD, finalized it and call it good but what I would really like to do is to capture the video onto a R/W DVD and then put that disk in to my laptop and edit the files using Movie Maker or something.


So to record on the D-R560 and then edit the files on my laptop :


1. What specific type of blank R/W DVD's do I need to buy ?
2. What mode do I need to format the disk, DR Mode or Video Mode ?
3. Do I finalize the recording(s) or not ?


Any help making this exercise easier is greatly appreciated !
CitiBear's Avatar CitiBear
04:33 PM Liked: 51
post #2 of 8
07-15-2014 | Posts: 3,060
Joined: Dec 2007
If your plan all along was to edit your digitized VHS, you sorta bought the wrong recorder for the task. You would be better off with a DVD/HDD recorder like the Magnavox MDR533 or Panasonic EH59, which are self-contained DVD editing/authoring workstations. You dub your VHS from a VCR to the unit's HDD first, where you can make edits easily, then high speed dub the edited VHS to your final DVD.

The workflow you describe of rough dubs direct to DVD/RW, then ripping to a PC for editing and final authoring, often doesn't work out so well. When I rip the digitized VHS from RW disc to PC hard drive, something often goes wrong and the ripped video files are distorted compared to the DVD source. I have had this happen on multiple computers using an assortment of ripping software: there is something inherently weird about VHS that screws up the ripped files (my same computers have no issue at all ripping DVD files recorded directly from TV).

Over the years, I have found that VHS doesn't suit the hybrid "recorder/PC" workflow: best results come by using either a self-contained DVD/HDD recorder for simple editing and burning of DVDs, or using the PC for everything including the initial VHS digitizing.

Of course each person sees different results depending on their VCR, tapes, recorder and PC. Try it your way and see if it works for you: it just might. You can use any RW blanks, but most AVS members would suggest Verbatim DVD-RW. Format the disc as Video Mode and finalize it when you're done filling it. PCs and video software can't usually read recorder-specific formats like VR or DR or unfinalized: to properly rip a DVD it should be finalized video mode. Depending on your video software, you might be able to use DVD+RW instead, which is a universal variation on VR that doesn't require finalizing. You'll need to experiment to find out what works best with your Toshiba 560, tapes, and PC.
Guitarstar's Avatar Guitarstar
08:42 AM Liked: 10
post #3 of 8
07-16-2014 | Posts: 73
Joined: Jan 2002
Quote:
Originally Posted by CitiBear View Post
If your plan all along was to edit your digitized VHS, you sorta bought the wrong recorder for the task. You would be better off with a DVD/HDD recorder like the Magnavox MDR533 or Panasonic EH59, which are self-contained DVD editing/authoring workstations. You dub your VHS from a VCR to the unit's HDD first, where you can make edits easily, then high speed dub the edited VHS to your final DVD.

The workflow you describe of rough dubs direct to DVD/RW, then ripping to a PC for editing and final authoring, often doesn't work out so well. When I rip the digitized VHS from RW disc to PC hard drive, something often goes wrong and the ripped video files are distorted compared to the DVD source. I have had this happen on multiple computers using an assortment of ripping software: there is something inherently weird about VHS that screws up the ripped files (my same computers have no issue at all ripping DVD files recorded directly from TV).

Over the years, I have found that VHS doesn't suit the hybrid "recorder/PC" workflow: best results come by using either a self-contained DVD/HDD recorder for simple editing and burning of DVDs, or using the PC for everything including the initial VHS digitizing.

Of course each person sees different results depending on their VCR, tapes, recorder and PC. Try it your way and see if it works for you: it just might. You can use any RW blanks, but most AVS members would suggest Verbatim DVD-RW. Format the disc as Video Mode and finalize it when you're done filling it. PCs and video software can't usually read recorder-specific formats like VR or DR or unfinalized: to properly rip a DVD it should be finalized video mode. Depending on your video software, you might be able to use DVD+RW instead, which is a universal variation on VR that doesn't require finalizing. You'll need to experiment to find out what works best with your Toshiba 560, tapes, and PC.

I wish I had the $$$ for a Channel Master DVR+ (CM-7500TB1) or something similar, but I'm not ready to commit that far yet. With a good deal of experimentation I was able to record a program from my HD antenna onto a un-finalized DVD+RW disk formatted as +VR, then drop the folder on my desk top and edit the files in PowerDirector 10. I haven't tried saving the edited file onto another DVD yet, but that's next. After reading your message I'm concerned that may have issues when trying to do the same thing with a VHS capture, I guess I'll know soon. I'll try and report back as to what I discovered.


Thanks for your response!
Kelson's Avatar Kelson
10:32 AM Liked: 465
post #4 of 8
07-16-2014 | Posts: 10,470
Joined: Jul 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guitarstar View Post
I'm concerned that may have issues when trying to do the same thing with a VHS capture, I guess I'll know soon. I'll try and report back as to what I discovered.
If the workflow you have established works for an HDTV recording it will work for a VHS capture. The issue is not the source of the video but the compatibility of the Toshiba's recorded file formats with your PC software. You seem to have that covered if you can transfer and edit the recordings. That puts you 75% of the way there.

Save your edited video files in .mpg format. To burn the edited file to a DVD-R that can be played in a DVD player, you need DVD authoring/burning software that will take in the .mpg file(s) and generate the DVD-Video disk structure and menus. There are some free DVD authoring apps in VideoHelp.com that you may find suitable. Of course, the best ones, like Video ReDo, cost money.
Guitarstar's Avatar Guitarstar
10:43 AM Liked: 10
post #5 of 8
07-16-2014 | Posts: 73
Joined: Jan 2002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelson View Post
If the workflow you have established works for an HDTV recording it will work for a VHS capture. The issue is not the source of the video but the compatibility of the Toshiba's recorded file formats with your PC software. You seem to have that covered if you can transfer and edit the recordings. That puts you 75% of the way there.

Save your edited video files in .mpg format. To burn the edited file to a DVD-R that can be played in a DVD player, you need DVD authoring/burning software that will take in the .mpg file(s) and generate the DVD-Video disk structure and menus. There are some free DVD authoring apps in VideoHelp.com that you may find suitable. Of course, the best ones, like Video ReDo, cost money.
Thanks for responding.


I think the PowerDirector software can do the write to DVD job. IIRC, it does ask weather I want to use MPEG-2, or MPEG-4, not sure which to select just yet?


There's so much to learn I'm not sure I understand all I know about it :P
Kelson's Avatar Kelson
12:27 PM Liked: 465
post #6 of 8
07-16-2014 | Posts: 10,470
Joined: Jul 2004
DVD Video is strictly MPEG-2 which is how it will be recorded on the Toshiba. Don't convert the codec because any program that authors DVD will have to convert it back to MPEG-2. Edit it; save it as .mpg if you need to make an intermediate file; use your software to assemble titles and create a DVD. Get yourself some DVD-RW to use for experimental test burns. DVD+RW is good for the Toshiba recorder and transferring files to your PC, but for no hassles with compatibility use DVD-RW for test burning disks to check playback on your DVD player. I'm not saying DVD+RW won't work, but if it doesn't you'll never figure out why. When you are ready to burn for real, use DVD-R for burning from your PC.
CitiBear's Avatar CitiBear
01:58 PM Liked: 51
post #7 of 8
07-16-2014 | Posts: 3,060
Joined: Dec 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelson View Post
If the workflow you have established works for an HDTV recording it will work for a VHS capture. The issue is not the source of the video but the compatibility of the Toshiba's recorded file formats with your PC software.
This is an area where you and I have a history of polite disagreement.

My experience with ripping DVDs to mpg files is that it works perfectly, as you describe, only if the source material for the DVDs was off-air TV or cable/satellite decoder box. Any mpgs I've ripped from DVDs comprised of dubbed material look like crap: horrendous horizontal artifacts that look like bad interlacing. Whether that is due to my specific DVD recorders manner of dubbing, I don't know, all I can say is dubs ripped from their DVDs to mpg files are unwatchable (while the original DVDs play fine).

VHS in particular has proven time and again to be a problematic source to digitize, among a wide range of AVS contributors. The best results seem to come from not half-assing it with the intermediate ripping step: either use a DVD recorder alone to make the final archive DVDs, or do everything from initial VHS capture to editing to authoring on a PC. As with all things AVS, "YMMV".
Kelson's Avatar Kelson
04:15 PM Liked: 465
post #8 of 8
07-16-2014 | Posts: 10,470
Joined: Jul 2004
That is peculiar. When I was still using my Panasonic E85, that is how I did all my edits. Both TV shows recorded off-air and VHS transfers. I would record to the HDD at SP then dub off onto DVD RAM to transfer to my PC where I would edit and author/burn to DVD-R. Worked perfectly for me, just not HD.
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