VHS to HDD\DVR - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 25 Old 09-02-2014, 04:03 PM - Thread Starter
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VHS to HDD\DVR

I'm looking to push my old VHS tapes to digits. I really wanted to use the PHD-VRX2 but the inputs are only for viewing not recording. I've looked at VHS\DVD combo units but they just seem very basic and after seeing all the features on the PHD-VRX2 I'm hooked on those capabilities. DVD burning capabilities that some provide are cool but far from a necessity. I would actually rather have blue ray burning capabilities for the larger storage volume. Having the basic ability to push video from a VCR to a hard drive and stream it back would be great for the right price. The ultimate component would provide AV hookups you can record off, switching capabilities between components, audio streaming capabilities, internet\network (RJ45-Wireless) streaming, dual tuners for Over The Air (OTA) and cable\dish tuning capabilities and 1080P upconversion. I was pretty gung-ho on doing a home theater PC (HTPC) but the new laptop I have can provide 90% of the functionality I would use on the HTPC. So why invest in another box in my home theater when I'm trying to eliminate as much as possible and I could integrate the laptop into the system with minimal space manipulation. I have some of the USB video converters for the computer but I just feel a component like a DVR that is built for recording would do a better job and provide 1080p upconversion. If anyone has any thoughts on the subject that would be great.
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post #2 of 25 Old 09-02-2014, 04:37 PM - Thread Starter
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I checked out the post below and found that the Philips DVDR3575H has what I need. There is an incredible amount of information in the post, which made it a little difficult to navigate but from what I could gather the Philips will fit the bill.
Magnavox 557, 537, 535, 533, 515, 513, 2160A, 2160, 2080 & Philips 3576, 3575

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post #3 of 25 Old 09-02-2014, 05:02 PM
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The 3575 was the 1st of 9 generations of Philips/Magnavox HDD DVDRs, now found only used.

The latest (9th) gen is the Mag 557, still available new.

The previous (8th) gen Mag 533 and 535 are also still available new.

PHILIPS HD DVRs | MAG/PHILIPS SD DVDRs* | DVDR/DVR COMPARISONS | POST-DVDR OPTIONS
*Due to the AVS SW change in June 2014, most but not all links in this thread will work if you're not logged in. If you are logged in, links should work if your User CP > Edit Options > Number of Posts to Show per Page is set to 30, the default.
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post #4 of 25 Old 09-02-2014, 06:42 PM
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There is nothing on the market that will do all the things you listed as easily as you might hope. These days, if you have any interest in keeping a personal video archive on hard drives you pretty much have to "roll your own" system and build a custom HTPC. Some members here adapt quite readily to such systems, while others find them a total PITA and would much prefer a commercial standalone product.

Unfortunately there is nothing: integrated BluRay/HDD recorders never landed in North America, and those that did exist in Europe delivered far less functionality than buyers expected. All other standalone devices that record to hard drives are sealed off, single-purpose units: they record directly from television sources for temporary storage but have no ability to dub VHS or export video files to another HDD or device. If the recorder dies, your recordings die with it. There are a couple oddball exceptions like the quirky iView that do record generic video files that can be transferred, but again only from TV broadcasts.

If you have a significant number of VHS tapes to digitize, your choices are a PC with recording accessories and software, or a DVD/HDD recorder like the Philips 3575 that appealed to you. Which to choose depends on your patience for geek-ery and whether you'd be happy with DVD archives or vastly prefer universal hard drive files. The DVD/HDD recorder is the easiest solution, because it is designed from the ground up to accept VHS as an input source.

Most PC input accessories, by contrast, were designed by morons who apparently never heard of VHS or thought it necessary to build in the required stability circuits. So dubbing VHS to a PC is full of pitfalls and unpredictable problems that may need goofy hardware and software solutions to overcome. A lot of people do put up with this tedious workflow because they REALLY want the end result to be a simple, compatible MP4 or AVI file. But it isn't fun and potentially involves much more work.

DVD/HDD recorders typically have input buffers that massage the crappy unstable signal from a VCR into something a digital encoder can tolerate. This can cut a huge amount of aggravation out of the process, but at the price of some limitations. Editing is very basic and not frame-accurate, and your end product will be a DVD with all the pros and cons of an optical disc format (dvd file structure not easily converted to MP4 or AVI without some hidden issues re-emerging from the VHS source material).

If you can be happy playing your VHS dubs as DVDs, or as DVD images ripped to your HDD player, get the newest Magnavox MDR557 recorder (preferable to the earlier 535 or 537 if you plan on ripping the DVD files to a HDD storage system). No other DVD/HDD recorders are currently available with a North American mfr warranty.
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post #5 of 25 Old 09-02-2014, 06:48 PM
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THE dmr-eh75??

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post #6 of 25 Old 09-02-2014, 07:05 PM
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For the past 10 years, I've been digitizing the family's VHS collection (on and off, but there's a lot of tapes!). Any kind of 'on-the-fly' recording to a compressed format is going to yield poor results...if you want to edit them later, the re-compression is going to kill them even more.

I wanted to save all the resolution I could (VHS is only 240 lines) and found the best way was to go via a MiniDV camcorder, and later a JVC VHS to MiniDV tape deck. The reason why MiniDV (AVI-DV) is better, is that it records every frame as a full picture ('I' frame). MPEG2 and h.264 save file size by only recording a full frame only so often, and throwing out what it can in-between these 'I' frames. You can either use the MiniDV tapes as an intermediary storage, or you can go via firewire from the camcorder to the computer. Yes, this is 'on-the-fly' but as an AVI-DV file, it is essentially uncompressed. The end result is video that is much more watchable than a highly compressed format...especially after editing.

There used to be a great white paper on Adobe's web site that I can't find right now, but this website pretty much sums up the same thing.
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post #7 of 25 Old 09-02-2014, 08:21 PM - Thread Starter
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So far this is what I have seen. The Philips HDR5750 manual did not show any RCA type AV connections for a VCR. I liked that it had a LAN and USB hook up but it wouldn't do me any good for the VHS conversion. Philips 3575 and the Magnavox MDR557 looked exactly alike but the Philips 3575 had an additional optical port which I liked since this is how I have my existing sound running to my Receiver. On the down side of these there is no network connections. From "Philips HDR5710 & 5750 HD DVRs" it says "they have wired or built-in wireless streaming, no adapter needed. OEM-installed channels so far: Netflix, Vudu, YouTube, CinemaNow." Would this make the hard drive accessible remotely through the home network to pull the video files and move them and can network drives with video or music files be streamed through it?
Philips HDR5710/5750 DVRs, Antenna/Cable, Streaming, Int/Ext HDDs, 33TB Storage
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post #8 of 25 Old 09-02-2014, 08:26 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnstownFlood View Post
For the past 10 years, I've been digitizing the family's VHS collection (on and off, but there's a lot of tapes!). Any kind of 'on-the-fly' recording to a compressed format is going to yield poor results...if you want to edit them later, the re-compression is going to kill them even more.

I wanted to save all the resolution I could (VHS is only 240 lines) and found the best way was to go via a MiniDV camcorder, and later a JVC VHS to MiniDV tape deck. The reason why MiniDV (AVI-DV) is better, is that it records every frame as a full picture ('I' frame). MPEG2 and h.264 save file size by only recording a full frame only so often, and throwing out what it can in-between these 'I' frames. You can either use the MiniDV tapes as an intermediary storage, or you can go via firewire from the camcorder to the computer. Yes, this is 'on-the-fly' but as an AVI-DV file, it is essentially uncompressed. The end result is video that is much more watchable than a highly compressed format...especially after editing.

There used to be a great white paper on Adobe's web site that I can't find right now, but this website pretty much sums up the same thing.

Am I understanding that you converted the VHS to MiniDV first to improve the quality of the video?
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post #9 of 25 Old 09-02-2014, 08:35 PM
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Am I understanding that you converted the VHS to MiniDV first to improve the quality of the video?
You can never improve video quality from a master. You can only hope to preserve as much as possible. There's no transferring VHS to a 1080p file and it magically has better sharpness, color, resolution, etc. Going VHS > S-Video > MiniDV recorder (AVI-DV) will preserve as much as possible at the expense of file size: 18GB for 1 hour. But hard drive space is cheap. It's not a plug-and-play method, and it takes some hardware that isn't made anymore, but can be found relatively cheap and is well worth the effort, I believe.
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post #10 of 25 Old 09-02-2014, 09:41 PM
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Would this make the hard drive accessible remotely through the home network to pull the video files and move them and can network drives with video or music files be streamed through it?
No and No.
As Citibear has told you there is nothing on the market that does everything you put down. If you want to digitize VHS tapes you need an analog capture device. That would be either a DVD Recorder or a PC based solution like the Hauppauge HD PVR. I would normally recommend using a DVD Recorder but if you want to burn to BD-R then you want the Hauppauge HD PVR for a number of reasons.

If you want a device for streaming both Internet content and locally stored media files, you need to buy a real media streamer. The WDTV Live for $90 at Amazon will play anything you throw at it.

If you want to record HDTV content as HD then you need an HD DVR.

Most of these functions can be combined into a single HTPC -- that has its own set of issues depending on your skill level.

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post #11 of 25 Old 09-03-2014, 05:43 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by CitiBear View Post
If you can be happy playing your VHS dubs as DVDs, or as DVD images ripped to your HDD player, get the newest Magnavox MDR557 recorder (preferable to the earlier 535 or 537 if you plan on ripping the DVD files to a HDD storage system). No other DVD/HDD recorders are currently available with a North American mfr warranty. .
Why is the 535 or 537 better if I plan on ripping the DVD files to a HDD storage system? I definitely will port the videos to a hard drive once they are all converted. I can only find used MDR537s which is ok if its the best option, but I would prefer something new with a solid manufacturer warranty. Depending on this, I am going to go with the Magnavox. I checked out the WD TV Live Media Player and I like it but I think I can get that and more using XBMC open source software media player and entertainment hub (http://xbmc.org/). Since its free Ill try it out then go to the WD TV Live Media Player if its not what I think it is. I'm also going with Lenovo IX2 2-Bay Diskless Network Storage ($79.99 amazon) and with two 3 TB Western Digital Caviar Green SATA III, ($107.99 amazon) hard drives to store all my media and personal files on. I had planned on using the BD as an off site backup of all my data but it may be more feasible to just purchase one or two extra hard drives for this.
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post #12 of 25 Old 09-03-2014, 08:48 AM
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Why is the 535 or 537 better if I plan on ripping the DVD files to a HDD storage system?
All of the Philips/Magnavox DVD/HDD models made prior to the 557 employ a somewhat peculiar variation of the DVD format. Their finalized DVDs will play normally just about anywhere, but when ripped to a PC hard drive for conversion or editing potential issues can arise depending on the software you have. The new 557 model seems to have dropped that file variation in favor of the standard DVD file structure used by every other DVD recorder brand.

If you don't already own a Magnavox, and have any notion of ripping the DVDs you make to a PC for further tinkering, opting for the new 557 model could save you from potential workflow issues. The older Magnavox models are perfectly fine if you're just building a standard DVD library, with no thought of altering the DVDs on a PC.

Quote:
I definitely will port the videos to a hard drive once they are all converted.

There is a difference between "porting" and "converting" which is where things get very sticky, so you need to choose the system most likely to give you what you want with minimum hassles. If you primarily plan to rip the dvds to your PC server or media player *as dvd images* then you can go with the Magnavox 557. If you intend to convert or break down the dvds into individual multi-purpose video files (MP4, AVI, etc) I'd suggest you avoid conversion altogether and go with the all-PC solution. It is better to create such files directly from the VHS source on the PC: converting from a DVD dub usually entails further quality loss that VHS can't sustain.

While DVDs *can* be converted to general-purpose video files, there are compromises. It works reasonably well with recordings made from off-air TV sources, but not so great with DVDs made from VHS sources. As JohnstownFlood noted, DVD is a lossy format, so a poor choice to convert from. Kelson typically suggests ripping the muxed DVD files direct to .mpg format, which avoids conversion loss and works with most media players.

But .mpg files can be huge, without any fantastic level of quality that justifies the storage space. And for whatever reason, any DVD I've made from VHS looks terrible if any attempt is made at extraction to .mpg or conversion to MP4 or AVI. Over the years, my experience with VHS has been "once dubbed to a DVD, it stays a DVD, or it turns into total crap."

Sometimes I regret not going with a PC solution eight years ago, when I began dubbing my VHS to digital. It would be nice to have portable generic video files that can be played on any conceivable device. But I chose DVD/HDD recorders because I couldn't cope with the non-stop PC encoding headaches (PC video inputs are allergic to VHS, the constant babysitting and workarounds drove me up a wall).

Digitizing VHS is a big bag of snakes, either way. You can have an easy, predictable workflow with a DVD/HDD recorder, but then you're essentially stuck with DVDs as end product. Or you can have easily-edited and versatile standard PC video files, at the cost of dealing with numerous VHS>PC aggravations. Choose your poison, is what it comes down to.

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post #13 of 25 Old 09-03-2014, 09:54 AM
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I definitely will port the videos to a hard drive once they are all converted.
See this post I just wrote:

SD Recording to DVD and MP4

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post #14 of 25 Old 09-03-2014, 10:03 AM
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Originally Posted by CitiBear View Post
Kelson typically suggests ripping the muxed DVD files direct to .mpg format, which avoids conversion loss and works with most media players.

But .mpg files can be huge, without any fantastic level of quality that justifies the storage space.
No bigger than the original VOB files. VOB files are already .mpg format. If you had a single VOB file from your DVD that contained only 1 title, all you would need to do to convert it would be to change .VOB to .mpg in the filename.

These days I recommend using MakeMKV to extract the individual DVD titles into .MKV files which can be played on anything and which retain the DVD chapter points. See the link in my preceding post. It works really well, there is absolutely no re-coding of the MPEG-2 video and I'm willing to bet it can handle even the sloppy magnavox files.

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post #15 of 25 Old 09-03-2014, 01:20 PM
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Yes, the .mpg file sizes are the same as the .vob sources. My point is that the file sizes are too large for the mediocre video quality inherent in a VHS>DVD encode to a DVD recorder.

Say you have four episodes of an old half-hour TV series dubbed from VHS to a typical SP-mode DVD using a recorder like the Magnavox. Each episode will have a .mpg or .vob file size of approx 1gb, which is way too big and hogs storage space on your eventual hdd archive. A carefully-made VHS dub done directly to a PC can give roughly the same quality in a 300mb file that is already in convenient .avi, .mp4, .mkv or whatever format you prefer for device interchange. Converting that already-lossy 1gb vob/mpg to a smaller more convenient file can result in a significant quality hit, vs just recording directly to the desired file format in the first place.

The fly in the digital ointment is the crummy unstable nature of the VHS signal: it all but requires you choose a primary storage/viewing format and stick with it. If you think you'll want the best of both worlds (a future-proof high quality archive dub that can be converted to any other convenience format), make uncompressed VHS dubs to a PC hard drive. Any conversion loss to smaller files will be minimal.

If you don't expect to play the VHS dubs outside a DVD player, or from cloned DVD images stored on a server, then you can use a Magnavox for digitizing and avoid the headaches of a VHS>PC workflow. But the lossy dvd video format and vob / mpg file sizes don't lend themselves well to further conversions or separated archiving. VHS sucks, digital dubs made from VHS suck harder: if you don't proceed with that fundamental concept in mind, you can waste a lot of time and money.

If you can be happy with straightforward DVDs or DVD image files, the Magnavox offers tremendous convenience and a smooth workflow. But if you have visions of home video servers dancing in your head, or deploying common video files to your phone, tablet, laptop and TV simultaneously- forget it. Make the VHS dubs directly to a general-purpose PC format. You really, REALLY do not want a multi-step, lossy, "vhs> dvd >other" workflow: the results are ugly.

Things are different with pre-recorded commercial studio dvds, some of which are incredibly high quality that suffers minimal loss when converted to smaller convenience formats. Ditto dvds made directly from anamorphic 16:9 ATSC broadcasts using the Magnavox internal tuner: these can be converted to other file formats without a dramatic hit to the PQ. But dvds dubbed direct from vhs are handicapped from the start, with less than half the quality (and twice the signal corruption) of those sources: conversion to other formats can result in severely compromised PQ.

The Magnavox recorders are usually sold by dealers with lengthy return/refund privileges. Anyone who's unsure of what they want to do should try a Magnavox for a couple weeks. See if ripping its VHS>DVD dubs to a PC and converting them to other formats gives results that don't make your eyeballs bleed. If so, keep the Magnavox, and you'll be happy with the VHS>DVD Recorder>PC File Conversion workflow. If not, return the Magnavox and invest in some direct-to-PC dubbing accessories.

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post #16 of 25 Old 09-04-2014, 09:18 PM - Thread Starter
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This is the configuration I’m considering. I am going with the Magnavox MDR557 mainly because of cost. I seriously considered the PanasonicDMR-EH75VS from both an ease of use perspective and quality of video transfer. I’ve seen a few comments across the forum that praises its quality of transfer. ButI think the Magnavox MDR557 can do a good enough job for my purposes.

I fooled around with some USB video capture devices and I now remember why I don’t want to go that route. Software can be flaky and takes a lot of effort. I’ll have the VCR running to the MagnavoxMDR557 via Composite AV cables for the transfer of tapes to DVD. As long as I have the videos converted to DVD format I'll have met the objective. I’ll take my chances with ripping them to the PC and the video quality levels. I tried out the MakeMKV software on an old DVD I had laying around and either it didn’t like Windows 8 or the DVD itself. But I haven’t given up on it yet. It’s still the first choice of LifeHacker.coms“Five Best DVD Ripping Tools” http://lifehacker.com/380702/five-be...ping-toolsFive.

I also would like to use Magnavox MDR557 for its DVR capabilities. I have Comcast Xfininity HD currently and I don’t believe the tuner on the Panasonic DMR-EH75VS can handle HD cable. Since the Magnavox MDR557 doesn’t have an HDMI input I’m assuming I will have to use the S Video connections with standard Composite AV cables for the sound to connect to the cable box. In the diagram I still have the HDMI running to the TV for a second viewing option. If I can run the cable straight to the DVR using it as the tuner, that would be the most desirable configuration. Ultimately eliminating the cable box altogether is my goal but I don’t know if that is an option yet.

Currently I have all my switching of components through my television. I picked up a receiver awhile back and was hoping to do all the switching there but the HDMI ports had some issues. So I run an Optical Cable from the Telelvision to the stereo for sound. I have an old set of Bose Speakers so I have to use either a receiver or amp in order to push sound through them. This is another reason I didn’t go the HTPC route. I then have my laptop running to the TV for any streaming I want to do like Netflix, Amazon, etc. as well as all my music files and photos.

I thought about using the hauppauge 1192 here between the laptop and the TV as a Video capture device but I’m still playing around with that idea. I am starting to collect John Wayne movies and I am hoping I can do that here with this configuration. I know there are ways of copying movies from places like YouTube but I have to research that a little more.

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post #17 of 25 Old 09-05-2014, 08:17 AM
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DVR is a whole other subject. Personally I think using a DVD/HDD recorder with cable in the 21st century is a terrible idea. Look at TiVo, Ceton or Silicon Dust instead. If price is prohibitive, get a $30 iView so you'll at least have HD.

You should get out of the video capture mindset and think about tuners instead. Since you already use a computer for streaming, it's trivial to plug in a tuner and get free HD DVR functionality with full guide and IR remote support and all your subscribed channels.
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post #18 of 25 Old 09-05-2014, 05:06 PM - Thread Starter
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DVR is a whole other subject. Personally I think using a DVD/HDD recorder with cable in the 21st century is a terrible idea. Look at TiVo, Ceton or Silicon Dust instead. If price is prohibitive, get a $30 iView so you'll at least have HD.

You should get out of the video capture mindset and think about tuners instead. Since you already use a computer for streaming, it's trivial to plug in a tuner and get free HD DVR functionality with full guide and IR remote support and all your subscribed channels.
I'm not too up on the tuner world but would like to start transitioning in that direction. Would I be able to drop the cable box with these? Also does this allow you to record shows and have the rewind functions that are currently part of the cable box? It seems like every time I decide on a path to go I learn a little more and I'm off in that direction. I'll check it out though. Thanks much.
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post #19 of 25 Old 09-05-2014, 06:21 PM - Thread Starter
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I'm not too up on the tuner world but would like to start transitioning in that direction. Would I be able to drop the cable box with these? Also does this allow you to record shows and have the rewind functions that are currently part of the cable box? It seems like every time I decide on a path to go I learn a little more and I'm off in that direction. I'll check it out though. Thanks much.
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DVR is a whole other subject. Personally I think using a DVD/HDD recorder with cable in the 21st century is a terrible idea. Look at TiVo, Ceton or Silicon Dust instead. If price is prohibitive, get a $30 iView so you'll at least have HD.

You should get out of the video capture mindset and think about tuners instead. Since you already use a computer for streaming, it's trivial to plug in a tuner and get free HD DVR functionality with full guide and IR remote support and all your subscribed channels.
Ok you have me intrigued..... I checked out the links below at building an HTPC. The Ceton seems great but what about the video capture. Is there any good PCIe cards that could do the trick. Also sound, I really would love to be able to control my analog speakers from my PC. If I was to go HTPC I would like to go all out and dump as much hardware as possible and integrate all my entertainment into that. I would probably go with windows 8 and the add on for Window Media Player but everyone raves about 7 so that's a bit of a toss up.


http://cetoncorp.com/products/infinitv/
http://www.pcworld.com/article/20488...under-500.html
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post #20 of 25 Old 09-05-2014, 07:12 PM
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YOU ASKED. I'VE got the colossus

but what about the video capture. Is there any good PCIe cards that could do the trick

http://www.hauppauge.com/

MickinCT

Last edited by mickinct; 09-05-2014 at 07:16 PM.
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post #21 of 25 Old 09-06-2014, 11:23 AM
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Originally Posted by radio star View Post
I'm not too up on the tuner world but would like to start transitioning in that direction. Would I be able to drop the cable box with these? Also does this allow you to record shows and have the rewind functions that are currently part of the cable box? It seems like every time I decide on a path to go I learn a little more and I'm off in that direction. I'll check it out though. Thanks much.
I have a 5 TV whole home DVR system with Ceton and WMC. I have zero cable boxes in my house. WMC does everything a cable DVR can and far more.

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...I would probably go with windows 8 and the add on for Window Media Player but everyone raves about 7 so that's a bit of a toss up.[/URL]
If you have other TVs in the house as I do, "extenders" is how you get a picture on them. Win 7 works with many different extenders (Ceton, Linysys, HP, Dlink, Xbox). But Win 8 only works with Xbox. Since I have a house full of Ceton Echoes, I'm stuck with Win 7. Windows Media Center on Win 7 and Win 8 are absolutely identical. So you aren't missing anything if you stick with Win 7.

I bought several copies of Win 8 when it first came out at $15 a pop and got several free Media Center add ons. I've since install all of them on every computer I own, EXCEPT my main media center PC. If I were buying today, I would find Win 8 Pro (WMC can't be added to Win 8 basic) and the add on too expensive compared to Win 7.
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post #22 of 25 Old 09-06-2014, 12:18 PM - Thread Starter
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On the htpc I think the setup below will do the trick, advice is welcome. I can get my software for free so I will probably go with windows 8.1 and the WMC add on. Can you use the extenders with 8.1 and the WMC add on?


This is what I looked up for an HTPC:
$70 AMD 5400K Dual-Core CPU with integrated graphics
$105 ASRock FM2A88X Extreme6+ FM2+ / FM2 AMD A88X (Bolton D4) SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 HDMI ATX AMD Motherboard
$40 G.SKILL 4GB Memory
$60 Silverstone MicroATX HTPC case
$50 500W Silverstone power supply unit
$100 2TB Toshiba hard disk drive
$250 hauppauge colossus capture device
$300 InfiniTV 6 PCIe tuner
$975 total
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post #23 of 25 Old 09-06-2014, 01:55 PM
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$250 hauppauge colossus capture device??

$140.00 newegg............

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post #24 of 25 Old 09-06-2014, 01:57 PM
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On the htpc I think the setup below will do the trick, advice is welcome. I can get my software for free so I will probably go with windows 8.1 and the WMC add on. Can you use the extenders with 8.1 and the WMC add on?


This is what I looked up for an HTPC:
$70 AMD 5400K Dual-Core CPU with integrated graphics
$105 ASRock FM2A88X Extreme6+ FM2+ / FM2 AMD A88X (Bolton D4) SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 HDMI ATX AMD Motherboard
$40 G.SKILL 4GB Memory
$60 Silverstone MicroATX HTPC case
$50 500W Silverstone power supply unit
$100 2TB Toshiba hard disk drive
$250 hauppauge colossus capture device
$300 InfiniTV 6 PCIe tuner
$975 total
Looks pretty good. You can get more opinions in the HTPC forum. As I said earlier, the ONLY extender that works with Win 8.x is Xbox 360, which are too big and noisy for my taste.

I personally went for a J1900 CPU since I'm not doing video capture and loved that it's only 10W, so it's very quiet and cool (important if it sits near your TV). I got my InfiniTV 6 ETH used for about $150. I added a 60GB SSD for the OS (huge performance boost), 3TB HD (2TB is probably plenty), and IR dongle (which you'll also need if you want to control it with a normal remote).

The Ceton gets hot, so make sure you have good fans in your case. With an external tuner, you don't have to worry about that.

I'd recommend baby steps just in case it turns out WMC isn't your cup of tea. Add an external tuner to your existing PC and see how you like it. Then if you do, build your system above.
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post #25 of 25 Old 09-06-2014, 03:40 PM - Thread Starter
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Awesome you guys, that will save me enough so I can afford the NAD I wanted. I also found some mini amplifiers I can incorporate into my system so I can get rid of the receiver as well.





Here is a configuration I also found but Ill have to look into the power needed to drive my speakers and understand a little more on what the DAC actually does as well


Last edited by radio star; 09-06-2014 at 11:23 PM.
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