Finalize DVD for any player - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 17 Old 03-08-2006, 06:38 PM - Thread Starter
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I was talking to a friend of mine the other day about DVDs. We all know that not all DVD-Rs that you burn on your machine will not be compatible to play in every DVD player on the market, right? My friend that I made a DVD for told me that it would not play on every player, which is something you should expect on homemade DVD recorders. He said some players would play it and some wouldn't. I wasn't surprised by his statement. He also told me that he was talking to a friend of his about the fact that there is a DVD recorder that has the ability to finalize a DVD so that it will play on every player on the market. I talked to his friend that made this claim and he said that he indeed has a DVD recorder that can do this. He said all you have to do is when it asks if you want to finalize the disc so that it can be played on all players, you press the enter button and it does. He told me that he bought this DVD recorder at Radio Shack. I'm not sure if I believe this claim, so I'm putting the question to any of you forum members out there. Are there DVD recorders out there that have this feature, and if so, what brand and model are they so that I can go out and buy one!
It's also possible that I'm not up on the latest recorders on the market that already have the ability to do this and I might not have kept up on the latest features of machines that can already do this. I've had my DVD recorders for a little over three years now and maybe some of the new ones can do this and I don't know about it. Any info would be appreciated.
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post #2 of 17 Old 03-08-2006, 07:17 PM
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The Quick Answer is YES :D

After a dvd disc is "Finalized" it will play in other DVD Players but not "ALL" of them.

The ones that they might not be able to play on are usually some older DVD Player models.

Any DVD Recorder that can record using DVD-R or DVD-RW Format Discs is capable of "Finalizing" the disc's so they will play in other DVD Players.

I have a Samsung R4000 (A Panasonic Clone) & my daughter has a Panasonic E55 & between the both of us we have never had a "Finalized" DVD-R that would not play on someone else's player.

Just wanted to add that the Samsung is a 2003-04 model & the Panny is a 2004-05 model & between the two of us we must have made & given out well over 200 DVDs without a problem.
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post #3 of 17 Old 03-08-2006, 07:32 PM
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You pretty much HAVE TO Finalize a burned DVD for it to have a chance at playing in anything other than the machine that burned it. Sure, it will play in a different instance of the same model of DVD Recorder, and maybe even between different models within the same brand, but until it is Finalized, it is not really a DVD that conforms to the DVD Specification, it has most of the information on it, but is missing the key parts that allow it to be played on DVD Players, it's like a Table Of Contents that the player looks at to see what is on the disc, without that most players will not know what to do with the disc, although as just described, some DVD Recorders can make sense of it since they must know how to read unfinalized DVDs as part of their normal operation. It's just that there is no standard for unfinalized DVDs, so there is very little compatibility between different brands of DVD Recorders for them.
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post #4 of 17 Old 03-08-2006, 08:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tunesman23
I was talking to a friend of mine the other day about DVDs. We all know that not all DVD-Rs that you burn on your machine will not be compatible to play in every DVD player on the market, right?
My friend that I made a DVD for told me that it would not play on every player, which is something you should expect on homemade DVD recorders.

He said some players would play it and some wouldn't. I wasn't surprised by his statement.
He also told me that he was talking to a friend of his about the fact that there is a DVD recorder that has the ability to finalize a DVD so that it will play on every player on the market.

I talked to his friend that made this claim and he said that he indeed has a DVD recorder that can do this.
He said all you have to do is when it asks if you want to finalize the disc so that it can be played on all players, you press the enter button and it does.

He told me that he bought this DVD recorder at Radio Shack. I'm not sure if I believe this claim, so I'm putting the question to any of you forum members out there. Are there DVD recorders out there that have this feature, and if so, what brand and model are they so that I can go out and buy one!

It's also possible that I'm not up on the latest recorders on the market that already have the ability to do this and I might not have kept up on the latest features of machines that can already do this. I've had my DVD recorders for a little over three years now and maybe some of the new ones can do this and I don't know about it. Any info would be appreciated.
The wording of your post forces me to ask the following:

Have you been finalizing the dvds that you've been making, or just recording onto them, and playing them back in the recorder that made it? Based entirely on how your post is written, it sounds like you didn't know about finalization-as I read your words and listen to my mind recite them, I sense this was something of a surprise to you.
Does your friend have a dvd player that's made by the same company as your recorder? Have you given out disc without knowing that they need to be finalized? The majority of recorders, this is not automatically done, you must do it yourself after recording all that you want to the disc.
As mentioned above, some older dvd players won't play some burned discs, you must also know if those older players with play +R discs or not. My sister has 2 older Apexs-one will play -R & +R, -RW discs made on my Panasonic E85 and ES30VS; the other will not.
Something else to look out for. :cool:

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post #5 of 17 Old 03-09-2006, 07:02 AM
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I have a friend who in our discussion on DVD burning wondered out loud why his burned DVD won't play in his relatives DVD players.

I asked: Have you FINALIZED your DVDs?

He responded: What finalized?

There lies the problem.
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post #6 of 17 Old 03-09-2006, 09:35 AM - Thread Starter
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Okay, I apologize for not wording my post correctly. Yes, I do finalize my burned DVDs. No, I haven't been writing to the DVD-Rs without finalizing them and trying to play them in other machines. Now that that's been corrected, my question still stands; is there a standalone DVD recorder deck that can burn to a DVD-R and then be able to play on ANY DVD player? From what I've heard so far, the answer is no. My friend who I made a DVD for said that the disc I made for him will not play on all machines. Unless I hear otherwise, I'm assuming that there is not a deck on the market that can make that claim. Thanks for all the replies.
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post #7 of 17 Old 03-09-2006, 10:50 AM
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The answer is no. There is nothing more than Finalizing that you can do to a DVD. All Recorders do it. The incompatibility comes not from how they were Finalized, but from the different types of media: DVD-R, DVD+R, DVD-RW, DVD+RW, DVD-R DL and DVD+R DL. Different players and recorders are compatible with that variety of different media types to differing degrees. More recently designed players will be likely to be more compatible with more of those types of media.
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post #8 of 17 Old 03-09-2006, 11:21 AM
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I'm sorry, but I have to agree with the others here and say, NO. The problems with media compatability are not the fault of the machine used to record the disk, but the other machines that you are using to play those disks. As has been stated, older machines lack the ability to read some of these formats, and some newer machines are strictly limited to reading certain formats. There is no machine that can guarantee that it can generate DVDs that can be read by every machine. Only commercially pressed ones can make that claim.

Luke

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post #9 of 17 Old 03-09-2006, 03:21 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Church AV Guy
I'm sorry, but I have to agree with the others here and say, NO. The problems with media compatability are not the fault of the machine used to record the disk, but the other machines that you are using to play those disks. As has been stated, older machines lack the ability to read some of these formats, and some newer machines are strictly limited to reading certain formats. There is no machine that can guarantee that it can generate DVDs that can be read by every machine. Only commercially pressed ones can make that claim.
Thank you, that was the answer I was looking for, and what I suspected all along, but wasn't sure. Now I can get back to my friend and give him this information, because he thinks that another friend of mine has a recorder that can do this. I'm curious though; why don't they make a recorder that can burn DVDs so that they can be universally played by all machines? That kind of defeats the purpose of making these machines for the consumer, doesn't it?
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post #10 of 17 Old 03-09-2006, 03:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tunesman23
I'm curious though; why don't they make a recorder that can burn DVDs so that they can be universally played by all machines?
As was pointed out just above your post, by Church AV Guy, the problem is in the players, not the recorders. Each DVD Recorder, for a given type of media that it supports, makes as good of a DVD of that type media as is possible, once Finalized. It is the "fault" of the players that certain types of media are not supported by the player.
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post #11 of 17 Old 03-09-2006, 03:32 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobkart
As was pointed out just above your post, the problem is in the players, not the recorders. Each DVD Recorder, for a given type of media that it supports, makes as good of a DVD of that type media as is possible, once Finalized. It is the "fault" of the players that certain types of media are not supported by the player.
Right, but I was talking about comparing a DVD burned on a home recorder as opposed to a commercially made DVD which can be played on 100% of all players made, even older machines. If I burned a movie on my Panasonic DVD recorder, I would bet that there are many machines out there that would not be able to play it, and not just older machines. That's what I'm talking about, whereas a commercially made DVD has no problem at all.
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post #12 of 17 Old 03-09-2006, 03:55 PM
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Okay, so you're question becomes: Why can't they make a recorder that creates (DVDs "just like") commercially-made DVDs? Well, there are machines that make those commercially-made DVDs (of course). But they are not cheap. So maybe that's the answer to your question.
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post #13 of 17 Old 03-09-2006, 03:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tunesman23
I'm curious though; why don't they make a recorder that can burn DVDs so that they can be universally played by all machines? That kind of defeats the purpose of making these machines for the consumer, doesn't it?
The original problem was that the first DVD players were built before there was such a thing as a "recordable DVD". So those players weren't designed to play them. DVD-R was designed to be as compatible as possible with older players, but it is still not 100%.

For more modern machines, the same type of thing is still happening. For example, the ability to record programs in "VR" mode was added to DVD recorders because it gives more flexibility for recording and editing than the original DVD standard allows. But again, normal DVD players were not designed to recognize this format and so most of them don't recognize it. This isn't a problem if you just use your DVD recorder to burn and play shows, but it becomes an issue when you want to give copies of DVDs to your friends. If you're going to do that, stick with "Video" mode DVD-Rs and you're unlikely to have a problem.
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post #14 of 17 Old 03-09-2006, 03:58 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobkart
Okay, so you're question becomes: Why can't they make a recorder that creates commercially-made DVDs? Well, there are machines that make those commercially-made DVDs (of course). But they are not cheap. So maybe that's the answer to your question.
You wouldn't happen to know what brand these machines are and what their cost is would you? Thanks for your reply.
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post #15 of 17 Old 03-09-2006, 05:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobkart
Okay, so you're question becomes: Why can't they make a recorder that creates commercially-made DVDs? Well, there are machines that make those commercially-made DVDs (of course). But they are not cheap. So maybe that's the answer to your question.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tunesman23
You wouldn't happen to know what brand these machines are and what their cost is would you? Thanks for your reply.
Well, bobkart was not being serious. You could sell your house and not have enough for a down payment for one of those industrial machines.

The original issue was reflectivity. The commercially pressed DVDs are made of reflective metal with pits pressed into them. The DVD-R, +R, -RW, +RW, and -RAM disks have a dye that changes reflectivity to simulate the pits in a pressed disk. The dyes have a much lower reflectivity, so the lasers and pickups in newer machines are designed to respond to disks that are mush less reflective than commercial ones. Just look at the difference and you will see what I mean. The burned ones are actually dark, not shiny.

The second issue is the "dash", "plus" format difference. The official, and original consortium made the "dash" versions, and they are the only ones that are officially recognized by the DVD consortium. "Plus" formatted disks are legally not allowed to have the official DVD logo. Other manufacturers, wanting to avoid paying the licensing fees, came up with the "plus" formats. The two are very similar, but different enough that a player needs to have the firmware for both in order to play both. SO, if you burn a DVD+R of some program, it will not play in a player that only has the firmware for -R, no matter how good the recorder, media and burn are.

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post #16 of 17 Old 03-09-2006, 06:47 PM
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Yeah the "they're not cheap" part was extreme understatement on my part. So the "answer to your question" part was meant to mean "they are too expensive to provide to consumers", regarding the "why can't they make a machine that can record universally playable DVDs" question.

And I spent some time looking for at least a picture of such a device but was unable to track one down.
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post #17 of 17 Old 03-10-2006, 04:30 AM
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Commercially-made DVDs are made by injecting plastic into a mold, placing the molded plastic discs into a vacuum chamber where vaporized aluminum is deposited on one surface, then bonding the label side onto the disc. This is a mass-production process that creates hundreds or thousands of identical discs at the same time. It involves heavy industrial equipment that's obviously not suitable for individual use.
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