VHS Tape Rot Is Real - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-02-2007, 02:37 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
gerrytwo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 220
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Liked: 11
While almost none of my DVDR discs are not showing disc fade or serious deterioration yet (so far, I tossed three recorded DVDRs that had playback problems, out of thousands burned), I am having the exact opposite problem with recorded VHS tapes. Part of the reason is that for the most part I used TDK VHS tapes. Playing back these 5 to 15 year old T-120 TDK tapes on my JVC VHS player, I usually have to check to make sure that the tapes do not have tracking problems, dropouts or audio problems. I first record the video on my Panasonic E-80 HDD. Recording a 10 year old tape of a French movie, Adieu Poulet, first running the video through a SIMA SCC color corrector to lower the color level, I was surprised when on playing back the video I saw several instances of just a blue screen, where the video was gone from the tape. I had previously made a DVD-R of the movie without correcting the color, so I used that DVD-R to make a new copy. This VHS tape had gone bad in two years.

Whatever anyone else says about tape longevity, my experience is that most lower quality tapes over five years old, like the TDK HS tapes and the even worse TDK SHG tapes, are on borrowed time. The audio quality of these tapes is mostly bad, but that seems to be because Time Warner Cable sends out a garbage mono signal most of the time, and its old Pioneer cable boxes introduced both video and audio noise when doing a bad job descrambling encoded cable channels. I used to think the noise video in the horizontal side overscan area was from my VCR but it was there because Time Warner rented out Pioneer cable boxes with defective chips in them.

The more you know, videowise, the more you get disappointed with the trash peddled to consumers, from shoddy rebadged VHS tape to defective cable boxes to TV stations that send out a mono signal that is labelled stereo at the start of the broadcast. When TY packages spindles of 8X DVD-Rs that have some coasters in the package, it is now joining a big group of electronic vendors that do not believe that quality control pays off. That group is probably right.

The US government, through the Consumer Products Safety Commission, lets in lead painted kiddie trains from China, then everyone explains the oversight by saying the CPSC is overextended and understaffed. There is always an excuse to do nothing, from repairing New Orleans to looking the other way when US Iraqi troops get defective body armor from Point Blank, owned by Jeb Bush's friend, to not having enough flu vaccine two years running. But, if the right people complain, like those who don't like HDD DVD recorders, the US goverment can find an excuse to get most of those units off the market. The same type of unit you need to make digital copies of your aging VHS tapes.

But back to my original subject. Most people don't keep old VHS tapes, except for stuff like weddings, birthdays and children's growing up videos. But anyone with a lot of old VHS recordings better not assume those tapes will last years more, unchanged, if properly stored. As I stated above, my recording of Adieu Poulet went bad in two years.

FYI, this movie was shown on a city channel about ten years ago with burnt in English subtitles. Even if the movie ever gets released in France on DVD, the French have a practice of not providing new English subtitle tracks to their domestic DVD releases. If I had not found that old DVDR recording, I would be up the creek, not having one of Lino Ventura's fine cop pictures.
gerrytwo is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-02-2007, 04:23 AM
Advanced Member
 
crabboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Henderson, Nevada
Posts: 873
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked: 31
I don't know for sure if this helps, but before I copied my old VHS tapes to disc, I ran them both ways in a video rewinder. Videocassettes are made on a similar principle to audio tapes and have the same weakness: a tape not played for a while "tightens up" on the spindles. This might explain tracking problems. Pre-winding also helps avoid tape stretching.
Many posters rave about tape longevity vs. home made video discs, but anything can happen - copy them now, and keep the valuable originals.

In space, no one can eat ice cream - Killer Klowns From Outer Space
crabboy is offline  
Old 09-02-2007, 04:37 AM
Advanced Member
 
beekeeper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 777
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by gerrytwo View Post

Recording a 10 year old tape of a French movie, Adieu Poulet, first running the video through a SIMA SCC color corrector to lower the color level, I was surprised when on playing back the video I saw several instances of just a blue screen, where the video was gone from the tape. .

The video has not gone from the tape but the Sima or Panasonic dropped it. BTDT

The tape has a bad sync problem in those areas. I found that two things cause the Sima/Panasonic combo to behave badly. The first is what you saw and the second is jitter caused by setting my JVC VCR to auto stabilize the tape. The Sima/Panny will cause the output to jerk ever so slightly but enough to eventually get on your nerves.

So I would take the tapes that have a problem and send the signal directly to the recorder. I was surprised when I did that with my Polaroid 2000g since I ended up with a very good picture compared to the tapes output.

I did have more problems with my Panasonic ES20. It tended to blue screen and did not give as good a picture as the Polaroid. Try turning off all stabilization features on both the Panny and JVC. Or buy a 2000g like I did. I re-did all my tapes after I got the Polaroid since it gave much truer color and better over all picture than the Panny. The color was not as vibrant as the Panny, but was true, which I preferred.
beekeeper is offline  
Old 09-02-2007, 01:09 PM
AVS Special Member
 
DaveC E100's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Twin Cities, MN, USA
Posts: 1,185
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I don't buy that "Tape Rot Is Real" theory. I have a lot of VHS tapes (including TDK) and from what I have seen, my VHS tapes are holding up extremely well. Mine start in 1978 when blank tapes cost $25 each. Granted, I haven't checked them all but for those I have checked, I don't see any deterioration. There must be some but they still look very good.

I would suspect a hardware problem is causing your trouble. Hang on to those old original tapes. They probably aren't as bad as you think they are. If you can find a really good VHS deck, they may play perfectly. I have never liked JVC consumer VHS and SVHS VCR's. Mine create blue screens at the drop of a hat. I have JVC Prosumer SVHS decks that cost $3000 new. They do a wonderful job of playing old tapes.

Dave
DaveC E100 is offline  
Old 09-02-2007, 03:44 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Rammitinski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Des Plaines, IL
Posts: 17,437
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 20
You know, somewhere along the line, they started making VHS tapes much, and I mean MUCH, cheaper. The cases and the tape itself became thin and flimsy, and the tapes would break off more often at the end of a rewind.

I can't remember the exact time, but it was probably around the mid-80's. I remember my old Kodak's, RCA's, Maxell's, TDK's, Fuji's, G.E., etc. originally being very thick and heavy, and then suddenly the new ones were just complete junk.

In fact, a lot of the newer ones I have broke, where my older ones are still intact (doesn't that just piss you off big time when that happens?).

These were just the standard grade ones, not necessarily the high grade ones. I never really bought that many HG ones (as I was just a poor kid and didn't have any real standards then anyway), so I don't know if those changed as badly. But I would think so, since they were made by the same companies as the SG ones.

Seeing that he says his tapes are 5-15 years old, they're likely to be not as good quality as our older ones were.
Rammitinski is offline  
Old 09-02-2007, 04:05 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Sean Nelson's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Vancouver BC, Canada
Posts: 3,323
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Liked: 20
I still have some RCA-branded tapes from around 1980 which I originally bought for $25.00 per tape (and that was on sale, the list price was $29.95). They're my oldest tapes, built like a brick and I had no problems playing them last year to transfer to DVD-R. I didn't have problems transferring any of my newer tapes either, but of course they haven't been sitting around for as long as those old relics have.

One thing I did notice, though - when I made copies of my old cassette tapes I had to clean the heads on the tape deck after every couple of tapes because of all the oxide being shed. It wouldn't surprise me if something similar was happening while playing some old VHS tapes too.
Sean Nelson is offline  
Old 09-02-2007, 04:48 PM
AVS Special Member
 
kjbawc's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan
Posts: 3,013
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rammitinski View Post

You know, somewhere along the line, they started making VHS tapes much, and I mean MUCH, cheaper. The cases and the tape itself became thin and flimsy, and the tapes would break off more often at the end of a rewind.

I bought my first VHS in 1989, and my first two SVHS in 1990, so I am unaware of any reduction in quality from the early 80s. But, I have used hundreds of Scotch, BASF, Fuji, TDK, and Maxell tapes. I've had a number eaten over the years, but never had one break - at the end, or anywhere. Some cassettes are rugged, and some flimsy, so I can believe that, but even if the tape has gotten flimsier, it certainly hasn't gotten thinner. I am sure of that because T-120 tapes take up as much space as they can on a reel today, so the older ones couldn't have been any thicker, because that would have required a bigger reel, and a thus a bigger cassette. Of course, they did start making T-160s, and T-180s, which require thinner tape, so those are more fragile.
kjbawc is offline  
Old 09-03-2007, 12:10 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Rammitinski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Des Plaines, IL
Posts: 17,437
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 20
Your right. I wasn't thinking straight there. What I really meant was that the adhesive, or whatever holds the tape to the spool, didn't seem as strong anymore. The tape itself didn't snap. It only really happened with maybe a handful of (different brand name) tapes.

But Sean was right - some of the brands were built like tanks back then in comparison.

Even if the box design hadn't changed (like with the Kodak's), in dim light I could always tell the old ones by just picking them up, because they weighed twice as much.

(They were all T-120's.)
Rammitinski is offline  
Old 11-25-2008, 06:10 PM
Advanced Member
 
KTTV Images's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 601
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I was with a major tape manufacturer for 7 years working on Tape development and QC. I have a VHS tape library all recorded on JVC recorders going back to 1979. Theses tapes are all to name brands. The tapes last and do fail as described at the top post on this thread. The problem described is likely to be a problem with the color corrector.
For safe keeping however Re-Recording them on another medium is a good idea. over many more years they may degrade.

KT
KTTV Images is offline  
Old 11-25-2008, 06:27 PM
AVS Special Member
 
DigaDo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Pacific Northwest.
Posts: 4,684
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by KTTV Images View Post

For safe keeping however Re-Recording them on another medium is a good idea. over many more years they may degrade. KT

Other more recent discusssion of videotape may be found in this thread:

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1080128

"A ROSE BY ANY OTHER NAME WILL SMELL AS SWEET. BUT IT DOES NOT FOLLOW THAT WHATEVER WE CHOOSE TO CALL A ROSE WILL POSSESS THE ROSE'S FRAGRANCE."

--Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield (1917)
DigaDo is offline  
Old 11-26-2008, 03:12 AM
AVS Special Member
 
CitiBear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 3,071
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Liked: 53
I have 3000+ tapes that I'm slowly dubbing to DVD, at least half go back more than 15 years and hundreds date back to 1981-84. They have suffered ordinary basement storage all that time. The only ones that rotted were rotten to begin with, like Ampex or a couple no-namers I used in the early eighties. The overwhelming majority of these still play fine, including the 5-10 year old TDKs, Fujis and Maxells often derided here. Just as with DVD media today, blank VHS became a commodity OEM product and the name brands meant nothing after 1990. Tapes made in the '80s weigh twice as much as tapes made in the '90s because they *cost* twice as much in the '80s: just as now, when millions of consumers just can't understand why the spindle of 100 Verbatims on sale for $19 at OfficeMax is total sh*t compared to when the same spindle sold for $39.95 on Black Friday in 2005. Money talks, you get what you pay for.

In the 80s, the tape shells were made of heavy-duty resin reinforced with metal, and the tape itself was twice as thick. By the 90s, the paper-thin shells were unreinforced, plastic rollers replaced polished metal, and all T120s were filled with thinner T160 tape because it was more "efficient" to mfr just the one thickness (not coincidentally, this dropped the price of T160s like a stone making T120s superfluous for most consumers). Nonetheless, the single biggest influence on tape longevity is the VCR that made them, compounded by the VCR you use today to play them. JVCs were and are an unmitigated disaster: any problem tapes I encounter that were not cheap junk to begin with are usually traceable to having passed through a JVC before storage. A single spin through a JVC can cause magnetic disturbances and barely-detectable physical damage to a tape, turning it into a nasty surprise when you play it again years later. Disgusting. The only machines worse were the atrocious Fisher vcrs blown out by Sanyo from every chain store in the USA.
CitiBear is offline  
Old 11-26-2008, 03:58 AM
AVS Special Member
 
kucharsk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Louisville, CO
Posts: 4,217
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 211 Post(s)
Liked: 138
I used TDK VHS tapes almost exclusively from 1984-2005 or so and they all still play back just fine.

Personally I had more problems with JVC (!), Kodak, Memorex, Polaroid and Scotch; TDKs and Maxells always seemed to work best. For SVHS I swore by Fuji H471S and swore at TDKs and (once again) Scotch.

That doesn't mean they don't age and won't go bad over time, but there's no reason to believe the TDKs only have a 5 - 10 year lifespan.
kucharsk is online now  
Old 11-29-2008, 10:45 AM
AVS Special Member
 
kjbawc's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan
Posts: 3,013
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by CitiBear View Post

...and the tape itself was twice as thick.

I know you were in the business, very knowledgeable, and all, but sorry guy, that's just not possible. If it were true, today's T-120s would take up only half as much space on the reel as the T-120s of yore. And that is NOT the case.
kjbawc is offline  
Old 11-29-2008, 11:17 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Dartman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Oregon
Posts: 1,639
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 13
I think all the video tapes I made mostly play back OK so far except the ones that were bad quality to begin with. I have been doing serious taping since about 82 when we got cable and I got one of my first VHS decks.
There is sticky tape problems with old audio reel to reel tapes, and some also shed oxide very badly even if they aren't sticky yet.
The binder on the bad ones was changed to man made stuff when folks decided wale oil was a bad thing to use. I just got back into reel to reel and have several 30 to 40 year old tapes that are almost or completely unplayable because of the change, other makers like Maxell continued to use some kind of binder that NEVER gets sticky or sheds to this day and their used tapes still command a premium price.
I don't know if video tape has similar issues, but so far none of mine have done that sort of thing, might be something to watch for.
When a audio tape does go sticky some folks bake them at low heat in a well controlled oven type thing for hours and it cooks the moister out of them long enough to get a few clean passes out of them to archive the contents.
Doubt video tape could take that if this issue ever comes up with them.
Dartman is offline  
Old 11-29-2008, 11:25 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
jjeff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Minneapolis MN
Posts: 10,013
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 187 Post(s)
Liked: 105
I'm not sure about "twice" as thick but I have seen newer T-120s that are missing the outer 1/4" or so on the reel. That outer 1/4" could correspond to 25% of the tape. On the tapes of "yore" the tape would basically fill up the reel. OK I think T-140s were still possible using the standard thickness tape, but that would be maximum packed. At least I had many T-140s and were told they were the still standard T-120 thickness.
jjeff is offline  
Old 11-29-2008, 11:45 AM
AVS Special Member
 
kjbawc's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan
Posts: 3,013
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
I don't recall any T-140s, but I do remember some very cheap BASF T-130s that weren't too bad, back in the 90s. When I get home, I will dig out some old Scotch T-120 from the late 80s, and some Sony T-120 from about 5 years ago, and compare inner reel, and outer/tape diameters, and see what I find...

Mind you, I am not arguing that tape is as good as it once was. But, the thinner tape (made to be longer) was always more expensive. If today's T-120 was half the thickness of the old T-120, then they could make T-240s, and the longest tapes I have heard of are T-180s.
kjbawc is offline  
Old 11-29-2008, 02:49 PM
AVS Special Member
 
CitiBear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 3,071
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Liked: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbawc View Post

I know you were in the business, very knowledgeable, and all, but sorry guy, that's just not possible. If it were true, today's T-120s would take up only half as much space on the reel as the T-120s of yore. And that is NOT the case.

Aw, jeez, okay, my bad: technically not twice as thick, I was continuing the thought of the old shells being twice as thick. Newer consumer-grade T120s made after 1990 used T160 tape stock which is, yes, 30% thinner not 50%: I have a bad tendency to write purple prose. Although, BASF did eventually manage to produce near-half-thickness tape: I have a couple of their T200 and T210 tapes, which amazingly still play fine (maybe because I only recorded on them once). For quite a spell, I was hooked on the T130 tapes which were cheaper than T160s but allowed a nice "cushion" to record four half-hour sitcoms like "Seinfeld", which NBC often ran a minute over schedule. Once the mfrs all moved to T160 stock as their universal consumer grade, price/durability differences disappeared and T160s became the default for everyone. There was really no advantage to using T120/130s anymore, unless you had the budget for studio-grade T120s at 500% markup to consumer grade (some of those still contained the thicker tape stock).

Its funny how many variables come into play if you have a long-term library: the blank tapes used don't always have the last word. Even though T120s were "better-made" in the early '80s, VHS *recorders* of that era were actually pretty bad, so those expensive early T120s often carry crummy recordings. VHS vcr quality peaked during 1988-1994, after that a downhill trend began as rabid cost-cutting set in. My best-looking tapes are on T160 stock recorded in those years.
CitiBear is offline  
Old 11-29-2008, 03:47 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
jjeff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Minneapolis MN
Posts: 10,013
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 187 Post(s)
Liked: 105
I remember those consumer BASF "chrome" T130s but didn't really use many myself. The T-140s I have were filled by someone who worked with commercial duplication machines and like I said I believe they were of the standard T120 stock. I don't think tapes were ever sold retail in the T140 length, probably only commercially.
jjeff is offline  
Old 11-29-2008, 05:38 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Sean Nelson's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Vancouver BC, Canada
Posts: 3,323
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Liked: 20
Regardless of the longevity of the tape, the writing is on the wall for VHS. New VHS equipment is getting scarce - transfer or replace your tapes with DVDs while you can. If you don't then when your current machine breaks 5 or 10 years from now it will probably be difficult or uneconomic to replace.
Sean Nelson is offline  
Old 12-03-2008, 12:53 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Church AV Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: High Desert, California
Posts: 4,638
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 57 Post(s)
Liked: 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjbawc View Post

I don't recall any T-140s, but I do remember some very cheap BASF T-130s that weren't too bad, back in the 90s. When I get home, I will dig out some old Scotch T-120 from the late 80s, and some Sony T-120 from about 5 years ago, and compare inner reel, and outer/tape diameters, and see what I find...

Mind you, I am not arguing that tape is as good as it once was. But, the thinner tape (made to be longer) was always more expensive. If today's T-120 was half the thickness of the old T-120, then they could make T-240s, and the longest tapes I have heard of are T-180s.

I can say for sure that at one point, my flagship VCR started to have "problems." These were caused by the replacement of T-160 thickness tape in T-120 cassettes. The "time to end of tape" function just quit working right, and that was because the thinner tape caused the overall tape diameter to be different and screwed up that function in the machine. It has this "automatic change from SP to EP if the tape was running out and the program wouldn't fit" feature, and that became useless after the loss of real T-120 tape. Oddly, selecting T-160 as the tape type didn't work either.

I used T-180s extensively, and I even had (have) many cases of T-210s. I was EVER SO clever saving space and so on. Now, getting those thinner tapes to play well has been VERY very difficult. Some of my 1978 T120s play much better than the most recent T-210s.

Luke

Evil is charming and beautiful. It makes you doubt yourself. It asks for one small compromise after another until it whittles you down, and it functions best when no one believes in it.-JOA
Church AV Guy is offline  
Old 12-03-2008, 01:25 PM
AVS Special Member
 
videonut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Suffern, NY, USA
Posts: 1,373
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveC E100 View Post

I don't buy that "Tape Rot Is Real" theory. I have a lot of VHS tapes (including TDK) and from what I have seen, my VHS tapes are holding up extremely well. Mine start in 1978 when blank tapes cost $25 each. Granted, I haven't checked them all but for those I have checked, I don't see any deterioration. There must be some but they still look very good.

I would suspect a hardware problem is causing your trouble. Hang on to those old original tapes. They probably aren't as bad as you think they are. If you can find a really good VHS deck, they may play perfectly. I have never liked JVC consumer VHS and SVHS VCR's. Mine create blue screens at the drop of a hat. I have JVC Prosumer SVHS decks that cost $3000 new. They do a wonderful job of playing old tapes.

Dave

I totally agree and have the same exact situation. I'm trying to convert my extensive VHS library to DVD+R over time, and so far I haven't had any VHS tapes fail on either of my JVC or Sony Prosumer decks.

I can't say the same for my Beta collection, as many have serious tracking issues, even when played on the same machines that recorded them.
videonut is offline  
Old 12-03-2008, 08:12 PM
Newbie
 
johnphilips's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
I just started going through several VHS tapes from my childhood (child of the 80's) and so far they are in decent shape. But I do need to get these moved onto a new digital media.
johnphilips is offline  
Old 12-07-2008, 06:58 PM
AVS Special Member
 
tkmedia2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: CA, WA, USA
Posts: 2,293
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
I only have 500 or so vhs tapes. Most from the 1990's. I was mostly using Beta in the 80, and Umatic in the 70's. I have not look thru them in a while. Half of them are consumer T-120 blank tapes you can buy in stores (mostly Fuji SHG, Fuji Master, TDK HI-FI) the other half is when I bought in bulk from custom video tape co. most are T-15 to T-92 with a few T-102. I have very few standard grade tapes. Most are recorded in standard speed as I don't have that many decks that are compatible with LP/EP/SLP. I have not spent a lot of time recently looking thru them. Is there a good way to inspect them without having to put it thru a deck? I ask because I don't want them the shed ruining the video and making a mess of the heads. Maybe they can be rebaked? Should I expect much problems?
tkmedia2 is offline  
Old 12-08-2008, 01:02 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Dartman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Oregon
Posts: 1,639
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Throw em in a re winder if you think they might be having issues. I have never seen a VHS tape yet that has the sticky tape problem, I just know it does happen to audio tapes. I have a couple, one is so bad the tape machine can barely rewind or fast forward it and it squeals the whole time you try to make it work, plus it leaves the oxide glued all over the whole tape path.
The worst I have seen so far is bad dropouts and oxide shedding on the heads of my vhs machines, and most tapes I have don't do that at all because I tried after the first few batches to only buy quality tapes.
Dartman is offline  
Old 07-23-2014, 08:26 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 0
DO NOT BAKE the TAPES!!!!!There is a gentleman in the Annapolis, MD area that has proven that the backcoating on old reel to reel and any future tapes is actually slowly deteriorating the tape. He has devised a way and is currently trying to make a machine to do it automatically. He has been able to restore old reel to reel about 30 years old back to its original quality when it was first recorded. DO NOT BAKE the tapes as this will force the backcoating to change similarly to as if you left food in a frying pan too long and now need a brillo-pad to clean it. That is the same idea behind the long run damage with baking tapes.

http://richardsonrecords.com/The_Rezerex_Advantage.html

Last edited by centmag; 07-23-2014 at 08:29 AM. Reason: Adding a URL
centmag is offline  
Old 07-23-2014, 09:20 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
Kelson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Delaware - The First State (USA)
Posts: 10,659
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 654 Post(s)
Liked: 507
deep necro-bump

Did you look at the date of the post you were responding to?

- kelson h

The bitterness of poor quality lasts long after the sweetness of the low price is forgotten . . . life is too short to drink bad wine

Kelson is offline  
Old 07-24-2014, 07:49 AM
AVS Special Member
 
billmich's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 1,491
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 98 Post(s)
Liked: 37
1st post newbie too
billmich is offline  
Old 07-25-2014, 12:18 PM
AVS Special Member
 
tomwil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,383
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelson View Post
Did you look at the date of the post you were responding to?
At least he didn't start a new thread with his ad.

That which may be known of God is evident within man, for God has shown it to them, so that they are without excuse. (Romans 1:19-20)
tomwil is offline  
Old 07-26-2014, 05:51 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Dartman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Oregon
Posts: 1,639
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 13
I knew that was a long time ago. I fixed my issues by eBaying a couple of Akai Glass GX head machines and they didn't have the issues the old Sony my StepDad gave me to try and playback all those old sticky tapes. Those things have a pretty strong reel motor and capstan motors and as long as the heads were clean it would pull those sticky tapes through and play with little help. Plus the GX heads after 30 years are still like new and very low resistance to the tape sliding over them which helped a lot. Some of the tapes were pro quality sound, most were old family made tapes from the late 40's on up to the late 70's and probably 90 percent of them I got to play well enough to get a fairly good sounding copy off with some EQ work to bring up the actual band tapes Dad had.
Now I have a couple of nice midrange GX Akais just sitting around like when I was a teenager and bought my first system with a Akai 4000ds reel to reel in about 77, couldn't afford a GX machine or 10 inch reels
Dartman is offline  
 
Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off