Questions about the Denon 591 - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 7 Old 11-22-2011, 08:59 AM - Thread Starter
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I am seeking information for purchasing my first HT, with at least HDMI v1.4a repeater (3D), TrueHD / DTS-HD decoding, Analog to HDMI upconversion and sound quality, does not need much power. I think the Denon 591 does this, i was leaning towards it but I had some doubts.

1. The lack of a USB for music or movies directly in the HT is needed?

2. The upscaling function thus improving the image of SD sources to offset catch a Denon 791 or higher?

3. The Denon 591 has HDMI Standby Pass Through?

4. If I buy a Blu Ray incremented with more features like Internet Access, DLNA, USB, upscaling, wireless ..., I will meet my needs of "features" that has only models above (and more expensive)??

Thank you for your attention.
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post #2 of 7 Old 11-22-2011, 09:31 AM
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I'm a bit unsure what some of your questions are asking, but I'll try my best to answer. I have the AVR 791. It has great sound quality, and the Audyssey function is great for auto calibration.

Now, from what I understand, the only differences between the 591 and 791 is the number of channels, 5.1 vs 7.1 respectivley, and the usb input. Other than that, the features and sound quality is pretty much equal. Though I have never personally used the 591.

1. I personally never use the usb input. I just play movies and music through my other sources. If this is a needed feature for you though, then the 591 doesn't have it.

2. There is upscalling of all SD sources. It upscales and "upconverts" as good as any other device that claims to do so. Just remember it can only improve image quality slightly. It can't turn SD material into HD material, it can simply make what is there, seem fresher.

3. There is HDMI stand-by pass through. In order to have it pass through content, you must turn on the receiver first with the video source playing, then turn off the receiver. The video source will remain on the TV, while the receiver will be off.

4. I'm unsure what you're asking here. But if you were to buy a Blu-Ray player with all of those features, then your combined setup of that Blu-Ray player with the Denon AVR 591, would be equivalent to a higher priced receiver with those features. Though the higher priced receiver wouldn't have the Blu-Ray Player.

Overall, the 591 is a good receiver with great sound quality.
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post #3 of 7 Old 11-22-2011, 09:58 AM
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Just a slight correction on your "requirements". There really is no such thing as HDMI 1.4a. Starting in January, the HDMI version numbers are supposed to go away (some mfrs have already stopped using those designations). Instead, just look for High Speed HDMI. That will take care of any current and probably future HDMI needs. The only difference would be with or without ethernet which is not a big deal for most people. The same holds true for the cables. You don't need to spend a ton of money on good, high quality Certified High Speed HDMI cables.

Pretty much everything else the above poster mentions is true. Personally, I'd buy an AVR without an integrated BD player. You're more apt to get a better BD player than what you will find in an integrated system. More robust, better feature set, better components. If you choose to add 3.1, 5.1, or 7.1, the sub-woofer will be passive if the system has an integrated BD player (the sub-woofer will draw its power from the BD player) so you won't get the bass response that you'd like. Active sub-woofers are always best and even a relatively inexpensive one sounds much better than a passive one (generally speaking). Besides, if your BD player ever fails, it's easier to repair with less trauma if it's standalone as opposed to integrated. I have a Yamaha HTR-3064 paired with a Panasonic BDT-210 BD player and they play VERY nicely together.
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post #4 of 7 Old 11-22-2011, 05:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto Pylot View Post

Just a slight correction on your "requirements". There really is no such thing as HDMI 1.4a. Starting in January, the HDMI version numbers are supposed to go away (some mfrs have already stopped using those designations).

I think you may be confusing changes in cable labels and software versions. Cables no longer use version numbers. Cables are simply Standard or High Speed (with Ethernet options). But, HDMI versions still apply to the transmitting and receiving equipment. So, the OP's spec for an AVR with HDMI 1.4a is correct.
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post #5 of 7 Old 11-22-2011, 07:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIslander View Post

I think you may be confusing changes in cable labels and software versions. Cables no longer use version numbers. Cables are simply Standard or High Speed (with Ethernet options). But, HDMI versions still apply to the transmitting and receiving equipment. So, the OP's spec for an AVR with HDMI 1.4a is correct.

Ok. It may still be confusing then because I believe I've seen AVRs that list High Speed HDMI as a spec but no version number was given. I suppose as long as the cable designation keeps up with the software version all should be fine.
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post #6 of 7 Old 11-22-2011, 07:38 PM
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None of the HDMI software changes through 1.3 and 1.4 have required new cables. While High Speed cables are recommended for 1080p video and 3D, Standard cables may work just fine for those features, especially over short distances. Ethernet over HDMI will need a new cable. But, I don't believe there's any equipment being sold that supports that function.
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post #7 of 7 Old 11-22-2011, 08:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIslander View Post

None of the HDMI software changes through 1.3 and 1.4 have required new cables. While High Speed cables are recommended for 1080p video and 3D, Standard cables may work just fine for those features, especially over short distances. Ethernet over HDMI will need a new cable. But, I don't believe there's any equipment being sold that supports that function.

Cool That's what I like about this place. You learn something new everyday.
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