Converting rear speakers to wireless? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 06-04-2013, 09:44 PM - Thread Starter
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Does anyone have a suggestion on converting a wired 5.1's rear speakers to wireless? Best Buy has a Rocketfish adapter, but (surprise) they didn't have any details on how it works. I'm hoping to find a converter that doesn't have to be turned on/off each time, but also one that doesn't suck power unnecessarily when the TV is off. i.e. one smart enough to stop powering the speakers when I turn the system off. Anything out there that might fit the bill? Thanks.
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post #2 of 9 Old 06-04-2013, 11:06 PM
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I believe the Rocketfish has a standby mode.
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post #3 of 9 Old 06-05-2013, 02:10 AM
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The Rocketfish RF-WHTIB is probably your best option here and the most popular product for this application. The receiver and transmitter stay linked to each other in a standby state when not in use. There's no action required on your part to get it to work after the initial setup. When the receiver provides the transmitter a SR/SL signal it automatically sends it to the receiver unit. As far as power consumption goes, the rocketfish manual doesn't give any specifics here except for "low power consumption" in the user manual. Considering its max rating is 30Wx2 RMS when in active operation I can't imagine standby power draw would even exceed a couple watts, not anything to be remotely concerned about. It won't consume nearly as much power in operation as your actual full-blown A/V receiver.

ht Panasonic 60" ZT60, Monitor Audio: Silver RX6, RX Centre, Radius 90HD; Martinlogan Dynamo 700, Marantz SR5006, PS3, Oppo BDP-103D
2ch Sony KDL-32W650A, Sony BDP-S1000ES, Marantz PM8004, JVC T-X3 tuner, Monitor Audio Silver RX1, REL T3, Apple TV, Peachtree Audio DAC•iT, Sennheiser HD598
lr Panasonic 50" ST60, Sony BDP-S5100, Apple TV
pc Energy CB-5, Audioengine D1, FiiO A1
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post #4 of 9 Old 06-05-2013, 02:51 AM
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How exactly does this work? Do you connect something to the receiver and then something to the speaker or what? I'm interested in getting this, too. Also, does the sound quality take a hit?
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post #5 of 9 Old 06-05-2013, 03:28 AM
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I'ts pretty simple. There's a sender and a receiver unit. The tiny sender unit connects to the Surround left/right speaker-level connections on your receiver and transmits the signals for the rear speakers to the receiver unit using the 2,4ghz band. The surround speakers stay connected to the receiver unit with speaker wire. The sender and receiver link automatically. The receiver unit has its own volume control to determine maximum output (I turned mine all the way up). it's a good idea to re-run your receiver's room correction software once you set up the wireless kit. If your receiver lacks room correction then try adjusting delay about ~20ms or so and/or double the distance to compensate for the slight latency the kit may introduce.

it can transmit audio up to CD quality, so it generally sounds fine. It can be prone to interference or dropouts depending on what else is running on 2.4ghz in your house. I never relaly had a problem with it when I was using the kit to power a pair of Energy CB-5s as rears. I also set up a system using the kit powering Klipsch KS-14s and it sounded fine, although it can sound a tad harsh at higher volumes. I wouldn't use it power speakers of average sensitivity that require good amount of power. You have to keep in mind it uses a class D amplifier that tops out at 30 WPC @ <10% THD.

ht Panasonic 60" ZT60, Monitor Audio: Silver RX6, RX Centre, Radius 90HD; Martinlogan Dynamo 700, Marantz SR5006, PS3, Oppo BDP-103D
2ch Sony KDL-32W650A, Sony BDP-S1000ES, Marantz PM8004, JVC T-X3 tuner, Monitor Audio Silver RX1, REL T3, Apple TV, Peachtree Audio DAC•iT, Sennheiser HD598
lr Panasonic 50" ST60, Sony BDP-S5100, Apple TV
pc Energy CB-5, Audioengine D1, FiiO A1
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post #6 of 9 Old 06-05-2013, 05:10 AM
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Thank you. That's very helpful fatuglyguy
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post #7 of 9 Old 06-05-2013, 07:33 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks, fatuglyguy. That's really helpful.
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post #8 of 9 Old 10-29-2013, 05:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fatuglyguy View Post

I'ts pretty simple. There's a sender and a receiver unit. The tiny sender unit connects to the Surround left/right speaker-level connections on your receiver and transmits the signals for the rear speakers to the receiver unit using the 2,4ghz band. The surround speakers stay connected to the receiver unit with speaker wire. The sender and receiver link automatically. The receiver unit has its own volume control to determine maximum output (I turned mine all the way up). it's a good idea to re-run your receiver's room correction software once you set up the wireless kit. If your receiver lacks room correction then try adjusting delay about ~20ms or so and/or double the distance to compensate for the slight latency the kit may introduce.

it can transmit audio up to CD quality, so it generally sounds fine. It can be prone to interference or dropouts depending on what else is running on 2.4ghz in your house. I never relaly had a problem with it when I was using the kit to power a pair of Energy CB-5s as rears. I also set up a system using the kit powering Klipsch KS-14s and it sounded fine, although it can sound a tad harsh at higher volumes. I wouldn't use it power speakers of average sensitivity that require good amount of power. You have to keep in mind it uses a class D amplifier that tops out at 30 WPC @ <10% THD.

I have been hoping for a wireless rear channel solution for our open concept living / dining area.

Does the Rocketfish unit make any sort of sound when not in use, such as low level white noise?

Is there any detectable sound or delay when the wireless channels come out of standby?
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post #9 of 9 Old 04-07-2014, 10:30 AM
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Is rocketfish still the best wireless rear speaker solution?
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