The Official RS-MaxxMudd V.2 Mix - Page 22 - AVS Forum
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post #631 of 715 Old 02-13-2014, 10:10 PM
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If I go with that one I will have to hire a pro painter. If I do the LL how many coats do I have to put on?

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post #632 of 715 Old 02-13-2014, 10:35 PM - Thread Starter
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at least 3... preferably 4.
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post #633 of 715 Old 02-14-2014, 08:27 AM
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Is it the same number of coats if spraying? Also, my situation doesn't really allow sanding of the wall. What effect will that have?

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post #634 of 715 Old 02-14-2014, 11:13 AM - Thread Starter
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6-8 duster coats if you're spraying.
if you're rolling i'd definitely sand after 2 coats before finishing with the last 2 coats.
if you're spraying... then i'd recommend sanding before applying the last 2 coats.

obviously, the less texture and more featureless your finish... the better the picture quality... especially for those with very big screens and laser eyes from close range viewing.
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post #635 of 715 Old 02-14-2014, 11:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pb_maxxx View Post

6-8 duster coats if you're spraying.
if you're rolling i'd definitely sand after 2 coats before finishing with the last 2 coats.
if you're spraying... then i'd recommend sanding before applying the last 2 coats.

obviously, the less texture and more featureless your finish... the better the picture quality... especially for those with very big screens and laser eyes from close range viewing.

Thanks for the info. That many spraying coats rules out the professional painter and I won't try it myself. I have been using the existing wall waiting for some screen mounting brackets and I don't notice the texture of the current drywall application. That may be because the paint is so flat(.5 gain or less, my guess), that you can't see the texture. One thing I have noticed is that the picture looks more pure. I think that perhaps this is because the wall is more consistent in evenness than the screen. My current plan is to roll on the LL and use the wall after the sun goes down and use the HP with 2.8 gain during the day when there is some ambient light. The HP gives a lot of "POP" to the picture. Will the LL have the same "POP"?

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post #636 of 715 Old 02-14-2014, 12:25 PM - Thread Starter
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your HP will have brighter white levels... but will lack the black levels... and it's retro-reflectivity will mean your best 'pop' will come from a narrow sweet spot.

the RSM-LL on the other hand will have plenty of pop but with a wider viewing cone. it will also have the black levels that your HP lacks. now when it comes to ambient light... the LL screen should fair better... in that it will have a better perceived contrast.
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post #637 of 715 Old 02-14-2014, 02:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pb_maxxx View Post

your HP will have brighter white levels... but will lack the black levels... and it's retro-reflectivity will mean your best 'pop' will come from a narrow sweet spot.

the RSM-LL on the other hand will have plenty of pop but with a wider viewing cone. it will also have the black levels that your HP lacks. now when it comes to ambient light... the LL screen should fair better... in that it will have a better perceived contrast.

Matched up with my JVC it should give me great blacks then.

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post #638 of 715 Old 02-18-2014, 04:13 PM
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pb_maxxx,

My local Home Depot says they don't carry Behr 1850 Ultra Pure White - Flat anymore and tried to give me Behr Marquee Ultra Pure White 1450. Is this part of the formula critical for the LL mix? If I can't get the 1850 what would be the next best?

Edit: Nevermind. I called to another store and they had it so I'll be picking that up tomorrow.

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post #639 of 715 Old 02-21-2014, 10:48 AM
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My painter is working on smoothing out the drywall now. He wanted to know if he could start with a regular primer as the first coat as he didn't think I had enough paint for four coats on the area of wall that will be painted. The wall is 115"s wide which equates to 132"s diagonal. The viewing area will not be that large but we are choosing to do the whole wall instead of just the viewing area. The primer is white color.

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post #640 of 715 Old 02-21-2014, 01:17 PM
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of course he can..and should use primer first, but Primer does not take the place of the RS-MM in any way.

Is this being rolled? If so a complete mix (almost a full gallon) should be enough for the area in question (115" x 96") if such is applied onto a fully primed /sanded smooth surface.

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post #641 of 715 Old 02-26-2014, 03:02 AM
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In need of direction from the PRO'S. So i have been reading this thread for quite awhile and i think its time to upgrade my viewing experience and quite possibly finish the room after 8+ years, more so now since i have had so much time on my hands after shoulder surgery. I am a little confused on which formula to use, also since the no-name HVLP sprayer is no longer in stock what would be a replacement brand/model? I currently have a Epson 3020 ceiling mounted 11'-06" from screen to lens. Seating is about the same distance. Light controlled basement family cave;) A work in progress for sure.The screen is a 117"GOO SYS paint on a Sheetrock plastered wall my former projector was a BENQ Pe7700 (RIP). The projector is used for TV, Movies and Gaming so pretty much everything. So any suggestions would maybe speed up my recovery time. I am sure i could some how incorporate the screen painting into my P.T. routine. Manny Manny thanks in advance Mike
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post #642 of 715 Old 02-26-2014, 07:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MississippiMan View Post

of course he can..and should use primer first, but Primer does not take the place of the RS-MM in any way.

Is this being rolled? If so a complete mix (almost a full gallon) should be enough for the area in question (115" x 96") if such is applied onto a fully primed /sanded smooth surface.

Last coat goes on this morning. Wall looks very white. Will be interesting to compare it to Da-Lite HP(High Power) as the HP is hung on the top part of the wall and will pull down right in front of the LL.

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post #643 of 715 Old 02-26-2014, 12:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JackB View Post

Last coat goes on this morning. Wall looks very white. Will be interesting to compare it to Da-Lite HP(High Power) as the HP is hung on the top part of the wall and will pull down right in front of the LL.

In advance...the HP will be brighter on-axis, much less so as one moves to either side.

RS-MaxxMudd LL will still be very bright, and should have superior Black levels and more saturated colors.

Cretins can smudge or dirty the RS-MM LL and it can be gently wiped clean. Cry if such happens to the HP.

Did you roll or spray? You seemed to indicate that you didn't want to try spraying....which is a shame because it's very easy.

A rolled RS-MM LL will actually have a bit more "on-axis" gain than sprayed versions, but a rolled screen also risks the potential of showing Roller marks.

We all will have to wait and see. cool.gif

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post #644 of 715 Old 02-26-2014, 05:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MississippiMan View Post

In advance...the HP will be brighter on-axis, much less so as one moves to either side.

RS-MaxxMudd LL will still be very bright, and should have superior Black levels and more saturated colors.

Cretins can smudge or dirty the RS-MM LL and it can be gently wiped clean. Cry if such happens to the HP.

Did you roll or spray? You seemed to indicate that you didn't want to try spraying....which is a shame because it's very easy.

A rolled RS-MM LL will actually have a bit more "on-axis" gain than sprayed versions, but a rolled screen also risks the potential of showing Roller marks.

We all will have to wait and see. cool.gif

I had my painter do it. My wife said he was here twice today which I think means there are five coats. He rolled the paint and from what I can tell, although the light is a little low, it looks very smooth. I'll watch a movie tonight and see. When we mixed the paint he said we should have used 5 ounces of water instead of 20 as the paint was very thin. Maybe that's why five coats. But it did cover an area 115"x96". If you are interested his bill was $300. I think the paint in all was around $75-$90.

I'll post my thoughts on the results tomorrow.

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post #645 of 715 Old 02-26-2014, 10:23 PM
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We just finished the movie. Picture looks great. Good color and contrast and brighter than I expected. However, as warned, there are two spots where the roller edge mark shows up. There is a little sparkle in the areas too. The two small areas can only be seen with a very light background; the ice in a hockey game for example. It is irritating enough to want to fix it as I watch a lot of hockey and golf with the blue sky background. How do I do that? Sand it? Wash with damp cloth? I hope I don't have to put another coat on though as I'm out of paint.

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post #646 of 715 Old 02-27-2014, 02:26 AM
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Roller marks can't be simply washed away, and dependent upon which coat the marks developed on, sanding isn't a reliable fix. In any case, the surface finish is a primary source of brightness, so sanding will mute that somewhat. Really, it's almost impossible to judge what might be a viable fix, as being remotely removed from the location doesn't allow for a accurate assesment.

$300.00 for a "Pro" to roll a screen, eh? Well if that isn't a testimonial for spending even $125.00 for a good Electric HVLP Gun and making an attempt at spraying one's self..... rolleyes.gif
It seems no matter how much the ease and affordability of doing so is elaborated upon, some folks just run screaming from attempting such themselves.

The RS-MM LL mix as listed has a paint component / water amount that is ideally suited for spraying. If rolling is attempted, the a a Pro should know that it must be done using a very low nap roller, and applied very wet, with very little back rolling...much like applying straight Polyurethane with a roller. One must always leave a wet edge at a row and then overlap that edge with wet paint....never roll out the edge. He also should have judged the viscosity of the mix as he was mixing to determine how much...or how little water he should add dependent upon his own rollers and technique.

It's not very easy or even fair to overly critique your Painter, but you did pay him pretty good to paint a single wall, and I'm sure he knew going in it was needed for a meticulous job to be done so something extra needs to be expected of him...it's not all dependent upon the paint.

That the painter needed to apply 5 coats tells me he applied them far too thinly, and wound up over-working at least a few areas with his roller. The very fact that a Pro still would still wind up with a few roller marks only cements the proposition that most Painters are not used to "Painting Screens" and employing the needed methods....they paint Walls where intense light is seldom projected on, and use paint that doesn't have the properties within to enhance contrast to a point where normal methods might not manifest such issues.

If the paint is formulated to be thicker, one still must use a low Nap roller and work wet edges with a minimum of passes. It's all about rolling technique, and frankly, trying to teach the minions out there how to roll contrast enhancing paints has always been fraught with frustration. Spraying was always the preferred method, but for years it was far too expensive. That changed back in 2004 when electric HVLP Guns came into the fore, and that change heralded in and made practical the use of paint solutions that were simply beyond the use of those who only used rollers. Even so, some have steadfastly resisted spraying as even being necessary, instead blaming the paint itself, or even the need for such paint. Never minding the fact that it is the paint that makes such results possible...along with correct application.

Well, all the above fussin' doesn't do you much good, Jack...I know. I'm expressing frustration that someone such as you who wants to match up a painted solution against a HP screen, a Mfg Screen held so near to the heart of so many and acclaimed as being impossible for any DIY effort to compare to, should come so close yet still be cursed with the dreaded Roller Mark Syndrome that is so easily avoided entirely by spraying. frown.gif

Now the bitter pill. It will almost assuredly take more paint. You can try sanding, but really, first you must ascertain as to if the roller marks represent any textured difference (...a raised line or ridge...) or are they embedded "streaks" that show through a couple of layers of paint. Streaking is what describes a very light roller mark. Sanding is really just an attempt to prep a surface for additional coats, and those coats won't help if the roller mark is a Ridge....not simply a Streak.

So.........I'm sorry there is no easy fix for Roller Marks...there never has been. I can only hope that the marks you see can be lived with, or at some time after the screen has fully cured it can be effectively sanded down and re-coated, and you will consider such as being worthwhile to do because you have at least come to appreciate what the RS-MM LL's potential brings to the equation. The Painter should at least be willing to come back at that time to apply 2 more coats.....carefully....for his original $300 fee.

To quote James T. Kirk;
"I'm laughing at the superior intellect"
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post #647 of 715 Old 02-27-2014, 08:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MississippiMan View Post

Roller marks can't be simply washed away, and dependent upon which coat the marks developed on, sanding isn't a reliable fix. In any case, the surface finish is a primary source of brightness, so sanding will mute that somewhat. Really, it's almost impossible to judge what might be a viable fix, as being remotely removed from the location doesn't allow for a accurate assesment.

$300.00 for a "Pro" to roll a screen, eh? Well if that isn't a testimonial for spending even $125.00 for a good Electric HVLP Gun and making an attempt at spraying one's self..... rolleyes.gif
It seems no matter how much the ease and affordability of doing so is elaborated upon, some folks just run screaming from attempting such themselves.

The RS-MM LL mix as listed has a paint component / water amount that is ideally suited for spraying. If rolling is attempted, the a a Pro should know that it must be done using a very low nap roller, and applied very wet, with very little back rolling...much like applying straight Polyurethane with a roller. One must always leave a wet edge at a row and then overlap that edge with wet paint....never roll out the edge. He also should have judged the viscosity of the mix as he was mixing to determine how much...or how little water he should add dependent upon his own rollers and technique.

It's not very easy or even fair to overly critique your Painter, but you did pay him pretty good to paint a single wall, and I'm sure he knew going in it was needed for a meticulous job to be done so something extra needs to be expected of him...it's not all dependent upon the paint.

That the painter needed to apply 5 coats tells me he applied them far too thinly, and wound up over-working at least a few areas with his roller. The very fact that a Pro still would still wind up with a few roller marks only cements the proposition that most Painters are not used to "Painting Screens" and employing the needed methods....they paint Walls where intense light is seldom projected on, and use paint that doesn't have the properties within to enhance contrast to a point where normal methods might not manifest such issues.

If the paint is formulated to be thicker, one still must use a low Nap roller and work wet edges with a minimum of passes. It's all about rolling technique, and frankly, trying to teach the minions out there how to roll contrast enhancing paints has always been fraught with frustration. Spraying was always the preferred method, but for years it was far too expensive. That changed back in 2004 when electric HVLP Guns came into the fore, and that change heralded in and made practical the use of paint solutions that were simply beyond the use of those who only used rollers. Even so, some have steadfastly resisted spraying as even being necessary, instead blaming the paint itself, or even the need for such paint. Never minding the fact that it is the paint that makes such results possible...along with correct application.

Well, all the above fussin' doesn't do you much good, Jack...I know. I'm expressing frustration that someone such as you who wants to match up a painted solution against a HP screen, a Mfg Screen held so near to the heart of so many and acclaimed as being impossible for any DIY effort to compare to, should come so close yet still be cursed with the dreaded Roller Mark Syndrome that is so easily avoided entirely by spraying. frown.gif

Now the bitter pill. It will almost assuredly take more paint. You can try sanding, but really, first you must ascertain as to if the roller marks represent any textured difference (...a raised line or ridge...) or are they embedded "streaks" that show through a couple of layers of paint. Streaking is what describes a very light roller mark. Sanding is really just an attempt to prep a surface for additional coats, and those coats won't help if the roller mark is a Ridge....not simply a Streak.

So.........I'm sorry there is no easy fix for Roller Marks...there never has been. I can only hope that the marks you see can be lived with, or at some time after the screen has fully cured it can be effectively sanded down and re-coated, and you will consider such as being worthwhile to do because you have at least come to appreciate what the RS-MM LL's potential brings to the equation. The Painter should at least be willing to come back at that time to apply 2 more coats.....carefully....for his original $300 fee.

The problem is entirely mine. I misunderstood the LL to be "the" roller version and did not advise my painter on the delicacy of the rolling or that it could be sprayed. I'm sure he knew that there was a possibility of marks but he was doing me a favor by sandwiching me in a couple of other big jobs in the community. He is an excellent painter and saved my bacon when we moved two weeks ago. I had converted a 3rd bedroom to a Video Room by painting the walls two different shades of dark brown. When I removed all of the speakers the holes had to be filled and the original paint was now a different color and my attempts to find the right match with color strips was impossible. Craig was able to blend on the spot and match both shades of brown. He saved me from a complete repaint. He did this throughout the house for $100.

That said, the problem remains; can I sand or wipe to remove the roller marks. If I wipe do I use a damp cloth? If I sand do I use 240 paper? Will careful work make it worse? If I repaint will I have to do the whole wall or will an area application blend in OK?

Jack
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post #648 of 715 Old 02-28-2014, 05:27 AM
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Quote:
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That said, the problem remains; can I sand or wipe to remove the roller marks. If I wipe do I use a damp cloth? If I sand do I use 240 paper? Will careful work make it worse? If I repaint will I have to do the whole wall or will an area application blend in OK?

Repeating my first sentence, Roller Marks can not be wiped away.

Sanding can be accomplished using a Large, Fine Grit Sanding Sponge (Dry) found in the Drywall Tools section at Home Depot (3" x 9" x 1")

You'll have to sand the entire screen, not just the affected areas, using very long, light, sweeping strokes t6hat overlap. You'd start at one end, and sweep vertically from Top to just below Center, and move carefully across the surface, overlapping the previous vertical row a bit. Us about 4 strokes per row before proceeding to the next row. Once you reach the other end, reverse and starting at the Bottom edge, sweep up into the Center, and go across to the other end in the same manner as above.

Now, do it again, only sweep the Center as broadly as you can reach.

This alternating sanding method will produce a result most likely to not create uneven texture or scratch marks. You really cannot use 240 grit to do the initial sanding as to be assured that you remove just enough material to "erase" the Marks, you need the Grit that the Fine Sponge provides.

After you have done your sanding, and projected upon the surface, if you do not note any marks...or sanding-induced artifacts, you can either do one of two things.

Stop and enjoy.

Or........Use the 240 grit ever so lightly in the exact same manner as the Sponge, using the Sponge as your Sanding Block, and further refine the surface to almost as smooth feeling as the un-sanded painted surface. This should help to restore most of an gain that is lost by sanding down the now existing surface.

In the end, if this does not completely eradicate your issue, in the least it will have prepared the surface for your next coats, and assure best possible results.


I probably need to bookmark these instructions, as I will probably have to repeat then again to some other poor soul. wink.gif

To quote James T. Kirk;
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post #649 of 715 Old 02-28-2014, 08:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MississippiMan View Post

Repeating my first sentence, Roller Marks can not be wiped away.

Sanding can be accomplished using a Large, Fine Grit Sanding Sponge (Dry) found in the Drywall Tools section at Home Depot (3" x 9" x 1")

You'll have to sand the entire screen, not just the affected areas, using very long, light, sweeping strokes t6hat overlap. You'd start at one end, and sweep vertically from Top to just below Center, and move carefully across the surface, overlapping the previous vertical row a bit. Us about 4 strokes per row before proceeding to the next row. Once you reach the other end, reverse and starting at the Bottom edge, sweep up into the Center, and go across to the other end in the same manner as above.

Now, do it again, only sweep the Center as broadly as you can reach.

This alternating sanding method will produce a result most likely to not create uneven texture or scratch marks. You really cannot use 240 grit to do the initial sanding as to be assured that you remove just enough material to "erase" the Marks, you need the Grit that the Fine Sponge provides.

After you have done your sanding, and projected upon the surface, if you do not note any marks...or sanding-induced artifacts, you can either do one of two things.

Stop and enjoy.

Or........Use the 240 grit ever so lightly in the exact same manner as the Sponge, using the Sponge as your Sanding Block, and further refine the surface to almost as smooth feeling as the un-sanded painted surface. This should help to restore most of an gain that is lost by sanding down the now existing surface.

In the end, if this does not completely eradicate your issue, in the least it will have prepared the surface for your next coats, and assure best possible results.


I probably need to bookmark these instructions, as I will probably have to repeat then again to some other poor soul. wink.gif

Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

Jack
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Still in search of some guidance in upgrading my viewing experience.

NEW projector is Epson 3020 11'-06" lens to 117" screen.

Found the Graco's 3900 SprayStation at the local Lowe's. Looks like it comes with 1.5mm tip and 1gal container.

Is the 1.5 mm tip small enough or should i get a 1.0 mm tip?

Any thoughts on the True Coat Pro 2?

Thinking that the RS-MAXXMUDD V.2.1 is the way to go.

What would my prep be giving that i am going over a grey gooscreen?

i have no roller marks only slight orange peel
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post #651 of 715 Old 03-02-2014, 12:58 AM
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Responding in two locations............
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstrplmer View Post

Still in search of some guidance in upgrading my viewing experience.

NEW projector is Epson 3020 11'-06" lens to 117" screen.
Found the Graco's 3900 SprayStation at the local Lowe's. Looks like it comes with 1.5mm tip and 1gal container.
Is the 1.5 mm tip small enough or should i get a 1.0 mm tip?


Get the 1.0 mm Tip.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Earlex-1-0-mm-04-in-Brass-Tip-and-HV3500-Needle-Kit-HVACV1/203391445?cm_mmc=sem|psocial|fbx|dynamic

For some time, the "No Name" HVLP (Graco 2900) was a unusually great bargain, with lots of sources...making the suggestion to spray both easy and economical. The additional expense of a 1.0 mm tip was no real financial hardship compared to the saving that came from producing a ultra smooth finish and a screen comparable to $2500-$3500+ Mfg. offerings. All that still applies with a HV-3900, I just lament the fact that the $49.00 specials seem to have lapsed at present.

I myself have been using the 1.0 mm Tip to great effect when also using the very thinned SF and RS-MM paints. Multiple light Duster Coats are truly "light" when such a fine tip is used, and one really knows when a proper dilution has been achieved simply by testing the mix on a sample board and when one gets a 10" tall spray pattern with a 1.0 mm tip....there you are.

However, the very "wetness" of any such loose, thinned Mix DEMANDS very light, multiple Duster coats, so that always must be taken as a sacred method of application.

A 1.5 mm tip can produce a very good finish as well, but both viscosity and Dusting technique have to merge very exactingly.

I have done Screens using the stock Graco 3.0 mm Tip, and that requires Duster spraying on 3 light coats, sanding, applying another 2 light Duster coats, examining the finish, and if needed, another light sanding followed by 1-2 light Dusters. The only issue being that a larger Tip produces larger paint droplets, and that will always result in a more textured surface.

With the 1.5 mm Tip, 3 light Dusters, a light sanding, and 2 Light Dusters can get'ter dun. Finer droplets...less work to achieve a smoother finish

Use a 1.0 mm Tip and if the Paint flow is right and quick light Dusters applied (5-6) no sanding is required and the finish as almost "Glass Smooth".


Any thoughts on the True Coat Pro 2?


Too expensive and not appropriate for producing ultra fine surfaces as it is only a "Airless Sprayer" not a true Airless HVLP


Thinking that the RS-MAXXMUDD V.2.1 is the way to go.

It is a good choice when a PJ has sufficient Contrast, and no serious ambient light is involved. Having extra Gain when watching 3D is always beneficial.
However since the Epson is already a bright PJ, and the ability to have Gray w/Gain exists ( re: additionally improved contrast on screen ), Silver Fire v2.5 2.0 is a natural "Next Step Up" to consider. That doubly applies when one takes into account that with a brighter PJ, and that gosh-durn White Tray Ceiling you have, improved on-screen contrast combined with Gain can & will help things out much more.

Have you ever seen or heard about Protostar's insert-able Black Tray Ceiling Panels? http://www.protostar.biz/flockboard.htm
Go to the link and scroll down until you see the
"New" label

What would my prep be giving that i am going over a grey gooscreen?

i have no roller marks only slight orange peel

You do need to sand the surface smooth. If you spray over an observable texture, it will show through, and with any high contrast Paint, jump out and be very noticeable.

With Orange Peel, as you sand you'll see the Tops of the OP bumps get darker, and that helps judge how effective your smoothing process is going. Use a Medium Grit Large Sanding sponge (9" x 3" x 1") you can find in the Drywall Tools dept at Home Depot. Use long sweeping strokes and the technique as described in the post preceding yours. The using a Fine Grit Sponge (...get one of those too...), give the surface another go.

Priming is not absolutely required, but highly advisable because it will not only help smooth your surface, it also will help show you any remaining issues, and lastly, provide a bright, underlying Base that will conserve and re-introduce absorber projected light. Also, the thin translucency of the RS-MM ans SF paints can make extra coats be required to cover the mottled surface that will remain after sanding.

Posting all this on your dedicated Thread so you can continue further discourse there.

To quote James T. Kirk;
"I'm laughing at the superior intellect"
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post #652 of 715 Old 03-03-2014, 03:35 AM
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thank you so much ole man river your knowledge keeps flowing unabated

will continue on my dedicated thread see ya there
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post #653 of 715 Old 04-24-2014, 02:07 PM
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I was hoping to get a confirmation on my plans.

I have the BenQ W1070 in a light controlled room. The room is about 16ft square and the screen should be about 122''.

My ceiling is 11 feet high and I want to ceiling mount.

Anyway, the plan is to use a 5' x 10' sheet of white expanded PVC and sprayed with MaxxMudd LL.

Anybody see a problem with this?

Trying really hard to understand basic principles of speaker building . . . . failing miserably.
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post #654 of 715 Old 04-24-2014, 07:20 PM
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Not from this camp....

To quote James T. Kirk;
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post #655 of 715 Old 04-29-2014, 06:43 PM
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I am looking for the "best" rollable screen for my dedicated space with a HD20 projector on a 110" screen. 95% of the time I am watching the TV after the sun goes down the only light in the room is from a dimmable row of lights directly above the couch. I am looking to use the below formula. Two questions, #1 is it the best choice for me and #2 do I use the **water if I am rolling (it did not say on the first page). Thanks so much!!

RS-MaxxMudd LL v.2.1
(for lower lumen pj's and controlled light home theaters)

20 oz. Rustoleum Metallic Accents - White Pearl
10 oz. Liquitex Basics Silver
12 oz. Behr 1850 Ultra Pure White - Flat

12 oz. Minwax Polycrylic - Satin finish
20 oz. distilled/tap water**
this is the only mix of the rs-maxxmudd family that can be rolled
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post #656 of 715 Old 05-07-2014, 03:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tilt View Post

I am looking for the "best" rollable screen for my dedicated space with a HD20 projector on a 110" screen. 95% of the time I am watching the TV after the sun goes down the only light in the room is from a dimmable row of lights directly above the couch. I am looking to use the below formula. Two questions, #1 is it the best choice for me and #2 do I use the **water if I am rolling (it did not say on the first page). Thanks so much!!

RS-MaxxMudd LL v.2.1
(for lower lumen pj's and controlled light home theaters)

20 oz. Rustoleum Metallic Accents - White Pearl
10 oz. Liquitex Basics Silver
12 oz. Behr 1850 Ultra Pure White - Flat

12 oz. Minwax Polycrylic - Satin finish
20 oz. distilled/tap water**
this is the only mix of the rs-maxxmudd family that can be rolled

Sorry to "bump" my post, but I would appreciate the groups guidance on my two questions. Thanks!
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post #657 of 715 Old 05-08-2014, 05:22 AM
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Tilt,

Your choice is a good one...in fact the only one should you be strictly rolling on the paint. Otherwise I would go with RS-MaxxMudd Standard and avail myself of a better increase in Black Levels the slightly darker mix affords.

If Rolling, you can reduce the water content by 25% and observe the consistency of the mix. It's always easier to add water than to remove it. If your spraying, you would always use the prescribed amount, if not indeed add a small percentage more should you opt to use the suggested 1.0 mm Tip.

Essentially, the water is in the mix to reduce viscosity when spraying, and to increase the level of translucency.

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post #658 of 715 Old 05-10-2014, 01:51 PM
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My current PJ is an Optoma HD65 (1600 lumens, 44K:1 CR)) that has nearly 6 years of viewing on it. Viewing has been about 3 hours a week (movies on weekends). I painted my 97"" Sintra screen with the old V.1 Retro mix and it has looked great. Now looking to upgrade the PJ to something like the Optoma HD25e or Benq W1070. Around 2500-2800 lumens with approx 20K:1 CR. Anyone have any idea how the new PJs look with the older versions of this paint? Any hotspotting, sparklies r other performance issues? I'll probably paint a new screen eventually once I pick a PJ, decide between RS-MM and SF and buy a replacement HVLP sprayer. I just don't want to put up the new PJ and have it look worse than the old one because of the increased horsepower. Or at least be mentally prepared for it. Otherwise Lucy will have some 'splaining to do.

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post #659 of 715 Old 05-12-2014, 05:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MississippiMan View Post

Tilt,

Your choice is a good one...in fact the only one should you be strictly rolling on the paint. Otherwise I would go with RS-MaxxMudd Standard and avail myself of a better increase in Black Levels the slightly darker mix affords.

If Rolling, you can reduce the water content by 25% and observe the consistency of the mix. It's always easier to add water than to remove it. If your spraying, you would always use the prescribed amount, if not indeed add a small percentage more should you opt to use the suggested 1.0 mm Tip.

Essentially, the water is in the mix to reduce viscosity when spraying, and to increase the level of translucency.


Thank you very much MississippiMan for the response. Another question for you since you seem to be the paint guru around here... I had an Optoma H31 480p projector in the past mounted 11 feet from a 90" screen, it had 850 lumen output. My new projector (HD20) is on a 110" screen mounted 13 feet away, the lumens on the HD20 is 1,700. The picture on my old screen was tremendous, great colors (even blacks) but no sparkle at all. I used the following formula (left):

1/2 cup minwax polycrylic (clear satin) [11 oz here, 12 oz in LLV2.1]
1/2 cup behr deep base (1300) [11 oz here, 0 oz in LLV2.1]
1/2 cup behr UPW flat (1050) [11 oz here, 12 oz in LLV2.1]
1/2 cup behr delt ceramcoat pearl finish [11 oz here, 20 oz in LLV2.1]
1/2 cup Delta ceramcoat Silver Metallic [11 oz here, 12 oz in LLV2.1]
20 drops Folk art bright red metallic
20 drops delta bright red - transparent
8 drops delta phalo green - transparent
4 drops delta phalo blue - transparent
4 drops folk art metallic amethyst
20 drops folk art metallic innca gold
20 drops delta yellow - transparent

Most of these colors are no longer available. Also, my PJ, screen size and throw distance have changed, so likely this would not be the screen for me anyhow. Mississippi Man, can you comment on the two formulas? I converted the old formula to ounces (on the right) and then ratio-ed up the batch so to compare the "old" formula to your LLV2.1 formula. The biggest differences i see are the lack of the deep base, the doubling of the pearl finish paint and the lack of the "color correcting" droplets. I am curious of your thoughts on the comparison between the two, does the LLV2.1 mix exhibit any noticeable sparkle.... if so should i back off the pearl finish component? Also does the pigment come out a neutral grey or is additional corrections desired, but eliminated from the formula because they can be handled in the PJ settings. Thanks so much!!
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post #660 of 715 Old 05-18-2014, 07:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adult Beverage View Post

My current PJ is an Optoma HD65 (1600 lumens, 44K:1 CR)) that has nearly 6 years of viewing on it. Viewing has been about 3 hours a week (movies on weekends). I painted my 97"" Sintra screen with the old V.1 Retro mix and it has looked great. Now looking to upgrade the PJ to something like the Optoma HD25e or Benq W1070. Around 2500-2800 lumens with approx 20K:1 CR. Anyone have any idea how the new PJs look with the older versions of this paint? Any hotspotting, sparklies or other performance issues? I'll probably paint a new screen eventually once I pick a PJ, decide between RS-MM and SF and buy a replacement HVLP sprayer. I just don't want to put up the new PJ and have it look worse than the old one because of the increased horsepower. Or at least be mentally prepared for it. Otherwise Lucy will have some 'splaining to do.

Bumping for more info. With less than optimal light control but primarily night time viewing, which current versions of SF and RS-MM would look better with the HD25e? The W1070?

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