Adding a border or frame to an existing screen - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-27-2012, 09:44 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
helmsman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Johns Creek, GA
Posts: 200
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked: 21
I have a DIY 2.4:1 screen (approximately 124" x 52") that I made a year or two ago and I would like to add a black border or frame to enhance the look. I guess the simplest approach would be to tape it but I really don't want to sacrifice much screen real estate to a 3 or 4 inch border, so I was thinking of making a frame and wrapping it in black velvet.

There are several posts on how to make a frame and cover it with velvet but my quesiton is on how to best attach it to the screen. I use french cleats to hang the screen on the wall so it's easy enough to remove it if necessary for this procedure. I don't want to just build a frame around it as I'd like to have a bevel on the inside edge of the screen (think Carada screen) to bring it right onto the screen surface for a nice crisp edge - I figure I'll give up an inch of screen on each edge for this, which is about how I have the picture projecting onto the screen anyway.

Has anyone done this? The two main questions are how to wrap the frame when you have this bevel on the inside edge (maybe taping it would be the easist approach), and how to attach the frame to the screen ensuring that the bevel uniformly touches the screen surface.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions and advice!
helmsman is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 03-27-2012, 09:51 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
MississippiMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Byhalia, Mississippi. Waaaay down in the Bottoms
Posts: 15,245
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 296 Post(s)
Liked: 253
The standard 3.25" MDF Base found at Home Depot has such a "Stepped-Bevel". Lowes also sells a "Smooth Curved" version that looks almost identical when wrapped to many Mfg Trim examples. When wrapping, the tautness of the slightly stretched velvet makes the fabric span any recessed surface on "Step-Trim" so it always looks like a smooth, graduated surface anyway.

What type of construction is your Screen? How far does it stand-off the wall?

To quote James T. Kirk;
"I'm laughing at the superior intellect"

http://www.invisiblestereo.com
MississippiMan is offline  
Old 03-27-2012, 10:06 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
helmsman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Johns Creek, GA
Posts: 200
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Thanks MississippiMan. The screen stands about 5/8" to 3/4" off the wall. I used poplar to build the screen frame (on which the screen material is mounted) and the screen thickness with the screen material wrapped around it is 1".
helmsman is offline  
Old 03-27-2012, 10:33 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
MississippiMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Byhalia, Mississippi. Waaaay down in the Bottoms
Posts: 15,245
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 296 Post(s)
Liked: 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by helmsman View Post

Thanks MississippiMan. The screen stands about 5/8" to 3/4" off the wall. I used poplar to build the screen frame (on which the screen material is mounted) and the screen thickness with the screen material wrapped around it is 1".

If the edge of the screen is flush with the Poplar, and you want to maintain the maximum screen size, then I suggest you first cut and place 4" long x 2.5" wide x 1/2" thick Plywood "blocks" around the outside edges as "Fur-outs" and then use 3.25" Mdf wrapped with BV and attached to those "spacers" with either Finish Nails or Velcro

To quote James T. Kirk;
"I'm laughing at the superior intellect"

http://www.invisiblestereo.com
MississippiMan is offline  
Old 03-28-2012, 07:25 AM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
helmsman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Johns Creek, GA
Posts: 200
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked: 21
That would work. If I understand you correctly the "fur-outs" would attach to edge of the screen and then I would attach the BV-wrapped MDF to the fur-outs. I think I'll construct the MDF frame first, get that covered with BV, then place it face down on the floor, remove the screen from the wall and place it face down on top of the frame, and then figure out the best way to connect them. I'm concerned how the edge will look but if any fur-outs are recessed enought then that shouldn't be a problem. If the frame overlaps the screen by an inch, then I would have 2.25 inches of frame extending beyond the edge of the screen to hide whatever I use for attachment.
helmsman is offline  
Old 03-28-2012, 10:05 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
MississippiMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Byhalia, Mississippi. Waaaay down in the Bottoms
Posts: 15,245
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 296 Post(s)
Liked: 253
Your going to make it much harder than you need it to be.

First off, I keep seeing a reference to "Screen material" but no actual description.

Secondly, the 5/8" to 3/4" is ambiguous. If you used Poplar, it was undoubtedly 3/4" thick.

Thirdly, it's not advisable to try to make a Frame first, them apply the screen to the Frame.

For one thing, you cannot see the "business" side of the screen when it's upside down.

Another issue is that the Frame would have to have Corner "L" Brackets, which themselves will create at least a 1/8" minimum stand-off...or more if you cannot get the screws for them to set flush with the surface of the Brackets.

Then to protect the screen surface you'd have to have something soft and clean underneath it.

And lastly, attaching the Trim correctly from the Rear is just a wrong way to go about it. Besides the difficulty of attaching the Trim securely by shooting fasteners through the Back of any supportive material and into the thinner Trim, if the trim ever had to be removed, the screen would again have to be taken down and laid flat on it's face.

There are several ways to go about this, but really only a couple of correct choices.

Considering that you already have a set 2.4:1 perimeter of 124" x 52", I think it best that every effort be made to retain those dimensions. That being said, 1" x 3" Poplar edging installed at each corner and along the sides, spaced at reasonable intervals will serve to equalize the "surround" to the Screen's surface.



The 1" x 3" x 5" "blocks" are attached directly to the wall with just one screw though the center. You don't have to hit a Stud....just use Coarse Threaded Drywall screws and hand tighten them down to just snug. Best to always pre-drill a hole to prevent splitting, and drilling a slightly larger, shallow hole to allow a recessing of the screw heads is always best.

Now all you have to do is piece the Velvet wrapped Trim onto the Blocks by attaching them using 1-1/2" Finish nails. The Trim's beveled edge will contact the Screen's edge all around, and probably do so completely flush to the surface.

To quote James T. Kirk;
"I'm laughing at the superior intellect"

http://www.invisiblestereo.com
MississippiMan is offline  
Old 03-28-2012, 03:56 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
helmsman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Johns Creek, GA
Posts: 200
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked: 21
Ah, a picture is worth a thousand words! Now I understand exactly what you're suggesting.

When I said 5/8 to 3/4 of an inch, I was referring to the gap between the wall and the back of the existing screen as it's currently hung on the wall. It's really probably 11/16 plus or minus 1/16 as you measure around the screen in various points. Then the screen frame itself with the screen material wrapped around it and stapled on the back is 1 inch. So I would need to make the furring blocks 1 11/16 deep so that once they're screwed onto the wall they are flush with the front surface of the mounted screen. I'll probably make them 1 5/8 deep and shim them out where they're not flush.

Thanks for taking the time to draw this out MississippMan. You're a great resource!!
helmsman is offline  
Old 04-02-2012, 10:04 AM
Member
 
PeterB123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 123
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
I did essentially this on the top and bottom of my screen. Since the sides are so close to the wall and my only variation (as far as aspect ratio) is top and bottom, I opted to not do the sides - and I'm happy with that choice in my specific situation.

I was very happy with the end result.
LL
PeterB123 is offline  
Old 04-02-2012, 11:50 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
MississippiMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Byhalia, Mississippi. Waaaay down in the Bottoms
Posts: 15,245
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 296 Post(s)
Liked: 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterB123 View Post

I did essentially this on the top and bottom of my screen. Since the sides are so close to the wall and my only variation (as far as aspect ratio) is top and bottom, I opted to not do the sides - and I'm happy with that choice in my specific situation.

I was very happy with the end result.

Glad your happy! However, you must get considerable reflection off those side wall panels, enough to actually degrade the "on Screen" contrast in the closest proximity to those side walls.

I'd bet a dollar against a dime that if you installed even brief, Black Velvet Curtains on each side-wall, you'd immediately notice a substantial difference. Yours is a absolute "worst case" scenario, excepting that the side walls are not white...or some other light pastel. Shoot, even a dark Flat Gray surface would "shine"-on at such a close reflective distance. In fact, I'd also bet you can see quite a difference between the darker Brown Door on the left and the lighter "tannish" colored wall on the right

Just suggesting a upgrade, out of lots of experience dealing with such. I hope it's something you can consider. Few and far between are issues such as what I see above so easily taken care of.

To quote James T. Kirk;
"I'm laughing at the superior intellect"

http://www.invisiblestereo.com
MississippiMan is offline  
Old 04-02-2012, 12:07 PM
Member
 
PeterB123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 123
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by MississippiMan View Post

Glad your happy! However, you must get considerable reflection off those side wall panels, enough to actually degrade the "on Screen" contrast in the closest proximity to those side walls.

I'd bet a dollar against a dime that if you installed even brief, Black Velvet Curtains on each side-wall, you'd immediately notice a substantial difference. Yours is a absolute "worst case" scenario, excepting that the side walls are not white...or some other light pastel. Shoot, even a dark Flat Gray surface would "shine"-on at such a close reflective distance. In fact, I'd also bet you can see quite a difference between the darker Brown Door on the left and the lighter "tannish" colored wall on the right

Just suggesting a upgrade, out of lots of experience dealing with such. I hope it's something you can consider. Few and far between are issues such as what I see above so easily taken care of.

A battle lost to the wife in the war for a HT. She wanted the room to be a crafts/play room.

I was just happy I could get the ceiling painted dark chocolate brown (practically black).

If I were single, the walls would look quite different; but then again, the living room would be the dedicated HT if that were the case. lol
PeterB123 is offline  
Old 04-02-2012, 04:22 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
MississippiMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Byhalia, Mississippi. Waaaay down in the Bottoms
Posts: 15,245
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 296 Post(s)
Liked: 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterB123 View Post

A battle lost to the wife in the war for a HT. She wanted the room to be a crafts/play room.

I was just happy I could get the ceiling painted dark chocolate brown (practically black).

If I were single, the walls would look quite different; but then again, the living room would be the dedicated HT if that were the case. lol

I hear ya...and have heard that lament before. Too bad she would not at least let you paint the opposite wall to match the Door...leastwise the actual Door's size.

It may be a kinda 'reverse compliment', but in the years I've been on this Forum, I'd feel pretty safe in saying that I cannot remember having seen another screen sandwiched in so tightly between the actual walls of a room as yours is above. Shadow-Boxing notwithstanding.

You take the Crown! Long Live "The King!"

To quote James T. Kirk;
"I'm laughing at the superior intellect"

http://www.invisiblestereo.com
MississippiMan is offline  
Old 05-28-2012, 01:50 PM - Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
helmsman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Johns Creek, GA
Posts: 200
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked: 21
This technique worked perfectly and I'm very pleased the the end result. Many thanks to MississippiMan for his sketch - that was my blueprint!

The MDF base moulding (3 1/2 inch) was inexpensive and has a nice curved edge that delivers a perfect inside edge on the frame against the screen surface. I ended up using screen border tape (4 1/2 inches wide) as my black velvet material that I bought on eBay. It cost me a little extra but it was worth every penny being very easy to work with and very high quality material. It adhered nicely to the base moulding, and I wrapped it around the edges and mitered ends and got crisp lines. I was concerned that the mitered ends would have a little gap between them when I put it all together but the joins are nice and tight and completely invisible.

I used 1 1/2 inch square poplar for my fur-out blocks and shimmed them out to be almost level with the screen surface (the velcro adds a little thickness), just one sheetrock screw through a pre-drilled countersunk hole in each poplar block. I didn't want to nail through the velvet frame when attaching the frame to the blocks, even with finish nails, because it's such a nice finish and I was concerned that you could see the nail heads. Industrial strength velcro from home depot did the trick. Under $10 for 4 ft x 2 inches, I cut all them into small rectangles and had some left over. Even though the frame stands off the wall over 1 1/2 inches, the blocks are well in from the outside edge so you can't see any of them unless you put your head right up against the wall.

It took a little while adjusting each of the 4 frame edges to get it exactly right - another reason to use velcro, you can readjust until you're satisfied. I'm going to be redoing my walls and repainting so I wanted to make sure I could easily disassemble and reassemble the screen, yet another reason for using velcro to mount.

I had always intended this to be a temporary screen until I bought a Carada Criterion screen but quite frankly I'm so pleased with how this looks (and I had originally used good quality screen material - eBay again!) that I think I'll stick with this permanently. My best advice when making a DIY screen is not to skimp on the screen material nor the border cloth (or tape, in my case). That way you'll be sure to get good projector performance and a professionally finished look.
LL
LL
helmsman is offline  
Old 05-29-2012, 08:39 AM
AVS Club Gold
 
MississippiMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Byhalia, Mississippi. Waaaay down in the Bottoms
Posts: 15,245
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 296 Post(s)
Liked: 253
Wow.

Now that's a classy looking project! Congats helmsman!

To quote James T. Kirk;
"I'm laughing at the superior intellect"

http://www.invisiblestereo.com
MississippiMan is offline  
 
Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off