Wood for screen frame? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 6 Old 11-25-2012, 05:53 PM - Thread Starter
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Where is everyone finding quality wood for building a screen frame? I ran by my local Home Depot and they don't have anything over 8' except whitewood or pine. Lowes had about 6 pieces of poplar in 10' length, but nothing that was either straight or unwarped (every piece was noticeably curved, warped or both). Loews also had red oak but that would add significant weight to the screen.

I thought about using the table saw to joint the outside edges, but I don't think I can feed 10' of wood through it evenly.
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post #2 of 6 Old 11-25-2012, 06:17 PM
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Hand picked WhiteWood or true "Kiln Dried" Clear Pine can suffice. But try another Home Depot. I was in my store today and noticed plenty of 10' 1x4 Poplar stock.

Beyond that, look for a Lumber supply that services Trim Carpenters (Millwork Supplier)

To quote James T. Kirk;
"I'm laughing at the superior intellect"
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post #3 of 6 Old 11-28-2012, 06:59 AM
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Kiln dried is a must. Any dimensional wood that is marked surface dried etc or not marked won’t stay straight. In my signature is a link that shows what I did with laminating plywood as a frame material. You could make any length with this method. It has remained straight and tight for many years in a basement with wide range temp and humidity changes.


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post #4 of 6 Old 11-28-2012, 07:43 AM
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I found 10' Oak boards at Lowes. They were by far the straightest boards there. Yes, it's heavier and a little more expensive, but it won't be warping. No matter what it is, either use it right away or keep it stored off the garage floor. Wood will absorb water from the concrete and warp something awful.
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post #5 of 6 Old 11-28-2012, 08:57 AM - Thread Starter
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I'll try a couple of other stores that are a little further away, just will have a problem transporting 10' long sections of wood for too far so I was hoping that one of the stores near me would have what I needed.

How do you tell if it is kiln dried or not? Nothing I could see indicated drying method.

As to oak or that really nice diy tensioning screen, weight is an issue for me. I don't have a solid wall to work from (large window in most of that wall) so I am planning on either hanging the screen from the ceiling or from brackets near the top depending on final distance from ceiling.

It always amazes me how hard it is to find simple stuff like this in a major city. Everything is either an hour drive away, a big box store with junk, or only deals with large volume contractors.
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post #6 of 6 Old 11-28-2012, 09:55 AM
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Oak is a pretty stable wood and all your trim grade woods are fully kiln dry. The only problem I would have with oak is if I planned to staple the fabric to it. I have made some frames from trim wood like this and poplar is a favorite of mine. Straight grain softer to staple to etc. what I have done with this type wood is to build a frame that uses two pieces for the frame each side made into a “L” section to resist warping. Glued and screwed together. This method also allows you to have some overlap in the corners and can be joined in two directions.


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