New in the World of Projectors and DIY Screen: Feeling lost - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 12-04-2013, 03:07 PM - Thread Starter
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Hello everybody,

 

 

I have been spending some time gathering as much information as i can on these forums. But this is my very first post. As i wil be making my own little movie room with a projector for the very first time. But i am getting a bit lost in all of this. I am based in europe (not uk) wich doesnt help understanding everything correctly.

 

 

I have decided to go for a BenQ w1070 placed 13' (4meters) away from the wall that i'll be projecting on. With a screen size of 157" (136" x 77") (4m x 1.9m) Max and maybe going smaller depending on what feels best. http://www.projectorcentral.com/BenQ-W1070-projection-calculator-pro.htm

 

About the room:  i am able to fully darken the room and for now it is coverd in a green wallpaper.

 

Now turning to the question. Since i'm a student on a budget i was planning on making my own screen and possible doing something with the walls. But i rly cant deduce what i shoud go for when it comes to the screen. There are so many options:

 

Wooden frame with blacked cloth

Wooden frame with MDF and painted

Wooden frame with spandex

Painting the wall

 

In my mind the first 2 options seems the most budget friendly for me. But i have no idea if i shoud aim for an as white as possible material , or grey ? or even black? Glossy or mat?  These 2 choices also seem the most easy when it comes to available materials, i'm unsure if i can find spandex or good wall paint for projector's in europe

 

And finnaly the same really comes to mind for the walls. If i stil have some budget left, what collor i shoud give the walls.

 

 

The picture quality doesnt have to be the best of the best. Aslong as i can get "good" value for money i'm more then happy, so that i dont end up making stupid mistakes and make the screen out of the worst possible combination there is.

 

Thank you for taking the time to read,

 

Hemi

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post #2 of 12 Old 12-04-2013, 07:23 PM
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I would paint the wall and get every other surface of the room as dark as you can, preferably with fabric, that fabric preferably being velvet (assuming this is a dedicated room).
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post #3 of 12 Old 12-05-2013, 03:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemigidius View Post

Hello everybody,


I have been spending some time gathering as much information as i can on these forums. But this is my very first post. As i wil be making my own little movie room with a projector for the very first time. But i am getting a bit lost in all of this. I am based in europe (not uk) wich doesnt help understanding everything correctly.


I have decided to go for a BenQ w1070 placed 13' (4meters) away from the wall that i'll be projecting on. With a screen size of 157" (136" x 77") (4m x 1.9m) Max and maybe going smaller depending on what feels best. http://www.projectorcentral.com/BenQ-W1070-projection-calculator-pro.htm

Hello Hemiglidius!

Welcome to AVS's DIY Forum!

Rethink your PJ choice first of all, as the screen size your wanting will push it to it's acceptable limits. Not beyond...but close enough that it's use will be very much a determining factor as to what screen material you will need/have to use.
Quote:
About the room:  i am able to fully darken the room and for now it is coverd in a green wallpaper.

That will be a big first step. The Ceiling being even more essential to treat than the Walls. Nothing is going to be less expensive than Paint and a Roller to do that.
Quote:
Now turning to the question. Since i'm a student on a budget i was planning on making my own screen and possible doing something with the walls. But i rly cant deduce what i shoud go for when it comes to the screen. There are so many options:

Wooden frame with blacked cloth
Wooden frame with MDF and painted
Wooden frame with spandex
Painting the wall

In my mind the first 2 options seems the most budget friendly for me. But i have no idea if i shoud aim for an as white as possible material , or grey ? or even black? Glossy or mat?  These 2 choices also seem the most easy when it comes to available materials, i'm unsure if i can find spandex or good wall paint for projector's in europe

Being that the Walls are covered in Wall Paper, building a Frame and stretching Black Out Cloth would seem to be the best course of action to take first. Go with a White BOC, and use the Coated side for your Projection surface
  • You can build the Frame to your desired Size
  • It's always best to start bigger and go down in size if needed. We can teach you a lot on this Forum but "Growing" screens ain't among them.
  • Since using Black Out Cloth will allow you opportunity to view your image, you can decide at that later point as to if painting a better surface upon it is warranted.

Quote:
And finnaly the same really comes to mind for the walls. If i stil have some budget left, what collor i shoud give the walls.

Ideally, the Color Scheme you should go with is a Mid-Level Flat Gray, or Gray with a slight Green undertone, and the Paint the Ceiling the same Color only 3x Darker. No need to go Black, and steer clear of Browns as they reflect a reddish hue.
Quote:
The picture quality doesnt have to be the best of the best. Aslong as i can get "good" value for money i'm more then happy, so that i dont end up making stupid mistakes and make the screen out of the worst possible combination there is.

Thank you for taking the time to read,

Hemi

I feel that by taking the above course of action, you will maintain a lower budget, create a optimal room environment for such a big screen, while all the while keeping your options open as to upgrading the Screen surface if you feel it's warranted.

To quote James T. Kirk;
"I'm laughing at the superior intellect"
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post #4 of 12 Old 12-05-2013, 04:18 AM - Thread Starter
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Very much appreciated for the help missisipiman! So paint wals a  grey and a dark mat grey for the walls. 

 

I also like the idea of using a dark red velvet like fabric to give it a feeling of a theatre.  Would this be an option to put a dark red velvet wallpaper on the wall,  floor and ceiling .  Or just stick with the grey paint idea? 

 

En when it comes to using a blackout cloth for making my own screen as white as possible or grey? And glossy or avoide glossy surface?

 

Thanks a lot for pushing me in the right direction 

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post #5 of 12 Old 12-05-2013, 05:18 AM
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Read all the above again.

White Black Out Cloth
Use the semi-glossy side for viewing / painting upon. Virtually all Black Out Cloth comes with a coated side and a cloth side. Use the Coated side unless it is truly "Glossy".

Dark Red Velvet is OK as long as it has no sheen.

Ceiling should be a dark Gray...almost a deep "Slate Gray" color. Always in a "Flat"

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post #6 of 12 Old 12-15-2013, 04:07 PM
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  • Hello MississippiMan, is the BO cloth good enough for a starter DIY screen for 3D? We are building a new house and planning to buy the Optoma HD25 LV which will be mounted 15' from the screen (about 130" screen). 
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post #7 of 12 Old 12-15-2013, 05:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjun Dev View Post

[*] Hello MississippiMan, is the BO cloth good enough for a starter DIY screen for 3D? We are building a new house and planning to buy the Optoma HD25 LV which will be mounted 15' from the screen (about 130" screen). 


It would be ptetty dim. I'll overview some facts and respond again asap.

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post #8 of 12 Old 12-16-2013, 07:32 AM
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OK......,

For a 130" diagonal screen, I would suggest placing the Optoma at 14'-6"....that is about 4" short of the minimum Throw allowable for that screen size, and that will deliver 31 fls of Reflective Brightness off a 1.0 gain screen

Black Out Cloth is on average approx. .85 gain, so using a worst case scenario, if you mount the PJ at 15' and we use .8 gain as a benchmark, you'll get 24 fls in Normal 2D Mode, but drop down to just 9 fls in 3D Even bumping the expected gain to .9 only renders 11 fls.

......and both those figures are dependent upon the Lamp putting out "New out of the Box" lumen output.

So to start out with, you probably should consider at minimum painting The BOC with a very Bright White paint (1.2 gain) that will get you Foot Lambert level up to 14fls in 3D mode.

Then later on...if you want the advantage of both brightness and greatly increased Contrast off-screen...a valuable asset with 3D content, you can consider applying a more advanced DIY Paint solution.

All the above is not to say that initially, when watching 3D in a totally dark room on the BOC, that you will be horribly disappointed. One thing about trying raw BOC is that it's still gonna be there to move forward if you determine it to be unacceptable.
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post #9 of 12 Old 12-16-2013, 08:18 PM
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Thanks so much...After reading more of your posts, I think I am going to try the RS-MaxxMudd but I am not sure which of the three formulas to use. I am expecting the room to be totally dark. What gain can I achieve with that?

 

Never used a spray gun but I am going to try it out if needed. I have not found a posting which talks about how many coats to apply, time between the coats, etc. So any help on selecting the MaxxMudd and directions of use will be greatly appreciated.

 

And finally, I am better off painting the wall or BOC?

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post #10 of 12 Old 12-16-2013, 09:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjun Dev View Post

Thanks so much...After reading more of your posts, I think I am going to try the RS-MaxxMudd but I am not sure which of the three formulas to use. I am expecting the room to be totally dark. What gain can I achieve with that?

If you use RS-MaxxMudd LL you can obtain a gain level of 1.3.
Quote:
Never used a spray gun but I am going to try it out if needed. I have not found a posting which talks about how many coats to apply, time between the coats, etc. So any help on selecting the MaxxMudd and directions of use will be greatly appreciated.

Actually, posted examples and instructions abound. But for a large selection of various Threads, simply follow this link: http://www.avsforum.com/newsearch/?advanced=1&sort=lastupdate&order=descending&type=35&createdbyuserid[]=50111
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And finally, I am better off painting the wall or BOC?

Your being "New in the World of Projectors and DIY Screen & Feeling lost " I personally would suggest constructing a Screen out of Flexi-White material. It has a degree of Stretch that makes it easier to mount onto a Frame than Black out Cloth, and it's surface is both smoother and less likely to introduce texture and/or the dreaded "Fuzzies" when paint is applied over it.
http://www.carlofet.com/projector-screen-material/flexiwhite-projector-screen-raw-material.html If ordered, be certain to ask for it to be shipped "In A Roll"......not folded.

Painting a Wall remains my favorite choice, but doing so must depend on the existing state of finish on the wall. It must start out being very smooth and as blemish free as possible. Usually, one must start out by sanding the wall using a Large, medium Grit Sanding Sponge (Home Depot Drywall Tools Section) and then spray applying a light Gray Primer. The Gray color helps pinpoint any existing blemishes, which them must be filled and sanded. Then at least 3 coats of sprayed on white primer is applied, followed by a very close and through inspection using a bright light that is casting it's light "across the surface" from the side so that the shadows resulting from any remaining defects will show up. If any do, you do a spot repair, sand the specific area first, the the entire screen area lightly...re-prime with two light coats, and you should be ready to go.

The larger the screen, the more painting a wall makes sense....if it's not in such bad condition it would take 2-3 days of work and 3 stints of sanding / priming to make it acceptable.
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post #11 of 12 Old 12-17-2013, 03:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MississippiMan View Post

Then at least 3 coats of sprayed on white primer is applied, followed by a very close and through inspection using a bright light that is casting it's light "across the surface" from the side so that the shadows resulting from any remaining defects will show up. If any do, you do a spot repair, sand the specific area first, the the entire screen area lightly...re-prime with two light coats, and you should be ready to go.

One of the techniques I used in a previous life, working on auto bodies, when trying to find blemishes, was to use a long sanding board. Like this:
http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=2398&familyName=Hutchins+Stiff+Longboard+2-3%2F4+inches+wide+x+16+inches+long

You would lightly spray a contrasting color on the wall, and sand with this board. High and low spots would be immediately visible as you work, and you could fill the low spots and sand down the highs as needed. This technique let us get very flat surfaces.
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post #12 of 12 Old 12-17-2013, 10:24 PM
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That is essentially what I'm suggesting, using a Light Gray Primer initially to reveal any defects. The object being to minimize the amount of sanding / painting, but still do whatever is required to effect a near perfect surface.

I don't use a Sanding Board, but suggesting the use of large 9" x 3" x 1" Sanding sponges has been the Status Quo for at least 10 years. biggrin.gif

But I'll relate this...for a couple Years I refused to consider thinning paint because I felt doing so would affect the paint's performance properties.

Then an astute and all-knowing Car Painter suggested to me that since my paints were water based, and I was using a HVLP Gun that usually sprays thinner materials, that I should "water down my paint" to get a smoother, less "Sand-paper'ey" finish. Bless him.

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