Help with salvaging painted on wall screen - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 4 Old 03-13-2014, 10:17 AM - Thread Starter
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I am in the process of building my first on wall screen in my basement. I followed a guide at Projector Central for the first pass (located here: http://www.projectorcentral.com/paint_perfect_screen_$100.htm). The paint that they suggested and that I used is the Sherman Williams ProClassic Smooth Enamel Satin and that is what I used in 2 coats. Prior to application I sanded the wall (which was previously painted to a light gray) as well as I thought I needed to. I applied the paint using 1/4" nap rollers and used a 2 roller method to apply and then smooth.

The second coat went on >24 hours ago and the results are unacceptable. I am seeing a very large spot in the middle the screen where the texture on the wall is clearly visible and almost sparkly. It is evident most in solid colors and bright scenes. I was hoping the paint would cure a bit less reflective, but I am not holding out hope.

Here are the details of my theatre:
* Benq w1070
* Screen size 110"
* Throw distance 11'
* Largely light controlled; from time to time one tiny window is letting in a small amount of light
* Will be masking with a velveteen wrapped frame of 1x3s

Prior to painting the wall, I was projecting on the original light gray wall and was decently pleased with the results. The new paint has better colors and is brighter, but obviously the texture is not going to work.

My question for the experienced folks on the board: is there a paint option that might work better in these conditions that I could roll on? I am willing to do another round of sanding, but I think I got it as smooth as I was going to get it (I sanded for a few hours total). I don't think I have the patience/skill for spraying, so I know that might limit my options. Thanks for any help you can provide!
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post #2 of 4 Old 03-13-2014, 10:49 AM
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Hi,

Yes, the recommendation of using any "Satin" is a poor one....and it doesn't help that such info comes from a well respected source.

Texture-wise, you should use a Medium Grit Large Sanding Sponge 3" x 9" x 1" (Home Depot -Drywall Tools Section) and sand (dry) with medium pressure in long sweeping vertical strokes. Do so moving across the screen, overlapping the preceding row a bit.

Occasionally knock any collect paint debris off the sponge. Sand until the surface feels slick. Note: When you start sanding, you will note how the high point become darker. This allows you to see how effective your sanding is going. But it all shouldn't take "hours" with a large sponge, perhaps 20-30 minutes at very most.

So now you have a truly smooth surface. You can roll over it without any additional priming....or spray. Your choices range from using a Sherwin Williams paint...Duration Flat White Enamel is a good choice...or move up to RS-MaxxMudd LL. However in truth, effectively rolling on a unblemished surface is far more problematical than get a perfect surface via spraying. Spraying itself is very easy....prepping and adjusting the paint mix is only slightly more involved.

The real question is how strong is your desire to have something really outstanding "performance & appearance" wise. It has been well documented by many end users that RS-MaxxMudd LL both helps to improve "on screen Blacks" proportionate to it's ability to also retain brilliant whites & colors. If you have little or no ambient light considerations to deal with, RS-MM-LL is a great choice. But I must reiterate, anytime one rolls on a paint, they must consider that there is a chance of getting observable texture and/or Roller marks, and that the pressure applied when rolling is a leading contributor to creating a "Too smooth" surface that accentuates sheen.

Help is here and available, and a review by you of Threads where other members experiences can give you a sound idea of what to expect is the singular best route to explore.

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"I'm laughing at the superior intellect"

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post #3 of 4 Old 03-13-2014, 11:03 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the super quick reply. I definitely understand that my decision will have a significant impact on how outstanding my solution is. I have had to make some pretty significant reductions in scope so far with this theatre build (mainly due to the room and budget) so at this point I am really just looking to get to a point where I am at an acceptable performance. I can live with something that is not the absolute best (that will hopefully come in some future theoretical build).

A couple of additional questions:
* Is the use of white in this instance preferable to some gray?
* If I decide to go with a rolled solution, I have seen contradictory information on what is best. I used a 1/4" nap roller this last time, but I have seen many folks say a dense foam roller is preferable. Do you have a opinion formed on your experience?

Thanks again.
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post #4 of 4 Old 03-13-2014, 04:03 PM
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A light Gray with gain is going to be a superior solution to any white. Even when the PJ has mega-Contrast specs. But that "Gain" part...that is the key. A sub unity gain gray screen will dull out white levels proportionate to the degree it enhances off-the-screen black levels because all that is really going on is attenuation across the spectrum.

RS-MM LL is roll-able using a 3/16" Nap High Quality Lint Free Roller (...Foam can be good...but it requires considerably more care and skill...) and it does preserves whites.

A basic Flat White surface is a simple solution and some find it perfectly acceptable. Certainly it's about the easiest and most assuredly successful application for a skill challenged NOOB to consider. But then again, so is getting a kiss from your great Aunt. You just know you can expect something out of it.....but nothing to really get excited about. tongue.gif

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