Laminate Screen Material and Testing! - Page 70 - AVS Forum
View Poll Results: What are your screen requirements? (Pick as many as apply)
I want something that is easy to install. 424 18.56%
I want something as inexpensive as possible. 371 16.24%
I want something less than $100. 269 11.77%
I am willing to spend whatever amount is needed as long as it's the best. 68 2.98%
I want a simple one can painted screen option. 68 2.98%
I want an advanced paint mix screen option. 51 2.23%
I want a single material screen option. 290 12.69%
I want something durable. 271 11.86%
I want an ambient light screen. 244 10.68%
I have light control and want a white screen. 235 10.28%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 2285. You may not vote on this poll

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post #2071 of 2849 Old 09-03-2007, 04:36 PM
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Hello Adi, I am new to this whole forum thing, but found your posts (as well as several other members posts) regarding DIY screens very informative and encouraging because I have young children and a more limited budget than perhaps many other members. That said, I was all ready to purchase a sheet of Wilson Art DW and make a supporting frame, untill I saw your post of 09-29-06, which included the following quote and series of images:

Quote:
Now, this next three screenshots of Rustoleum Metallic (top) and DW (bottom) seems to agree with you. Rustoleum Metallic certainly has much higher gain than DW.

This section showed each of 3 groups of pictures demonstrating Rustoleum Metalic paint quite obviously superior to the DW laminate. But since Rustoleum makes six (6) different metallic formulations in Silver Metallic alone(!), could you provide the product SKU number for the one used in those screenshots and briefly describe your most successful method of application of this paint?

I plan on purchasing a Panasonic PT-AX100U (affordable for me, and has seemingly excellent user reviews - price vs. quality) to use with my DIY screen in a viewing room 25' long by 11' wide with no windows and controllable recessed can lighting. So I have ONE additional question: With a maximum ceiling height of 7'-4" what might be an optimum distance from the screen to the lens to project a 16:9 image to a 120" diagonal screen? Thank you again for sharing your knowledge. signed, Dave
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post #2072 of 2849 Old 09-03-2007, 10:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CuriousDME View Post

I plan on purchasing a Panasonic PT-AX100U (affordable for me, and has seemingly excellent user reviews - price vs. quality) to use with my DIY screen in a viewing room 25' long by 11' wide with no windows and controllable recessed can lighting. So I have ONE additional question: With a maximum ceiling height of 7'-4" what might be an optimum distance from the screen to the lens to project a 16:9 image to a 120" diagonal screen? Thank you again for sharing your knowledge. signed, Dave

That projector (AX100U) has a 2:1 zoom, which gives you a lot of flexibility in where you can mount it and obtain a 120" screen.

Per the manual, you can mount it anywhere from 12'1" away to 24'3" away. The closer you mount it, the brighter the image (due to the lens being opened up all the way)...the further away you mount it, the better the contrast. The brightness dropoff could be as much as 30%.

From projectorreviews.com:
Quote:


I've already raved about how bright this projector is. Now, I will provide you the results of my measurements. Let me state first that when measuring, the PT-AX100U was set up so the lens was in widest angle mode (allowing the largest image from any distance). This is the mode that lets the most light out of the lens. Zoom into full telephoto mode and the projector will lose some brightness - I estimate possibly up to 30%, but I'm guessing here. Obviously, with the lens in a more middle position in terms of zoom, the brightness loss will be more minimal.

This time I'd like to start with brightest mode, Dynamic. Without adjusting the settings the PT-AX100U measured a whopping 2025 lumens! Dynamic is going to be the least accurate mode in terms of color balance, contrast, color saturation etc., as manufacturers set brightest mode to do the best job under bad lighting conditions with the idea that maximum brightness is the goal. I also measured the projector in Eco (low) power mode, which saves lamp life. Eco-mode reduced brightness to 1470 lumens, a reduction of roughly 27%. This drop in brightness should be pretty consistant across all image modes.

For watching sports with a fair amount of ambient light, I mostly used the Dynamic mode to see how well the PT-AX100U could do under adverse situations. I did, however, adjust the colors, removing a fair amount of green, and making other changes, to get a more pleasing image, without sacrificing too much brightness. I didn't measure this as this was in my "theater" and I do my measurements in the "testing room". If I had to guess, my adjustments might have lowered brightness by 10% or so, to perhaps 1800 lumens or a touch less. Purely a guess, mind you!

The other bright modes: Panasonic offers two other "bright modes - Vivid Cinema (obviously for watching movies with too much room light) and Normal, which I found worked great on HDTV and TV (such as The Tonight Show, sports, Discovery HD, etc).

In Vivid Cinema mode, the PT-AX100U produced an extremely impressive (and bright) 1181 lumens (full power on the lamp) and Normal Mode was even brighter, weighing in at 1418 lumens!

Dropping down to the "more perfect" dark room modes, which provide the best pure image quality, here's what I measured:

* Cinema 1 mode: 707 lumens, ( slightly lower after I did a basic calibration on this mode - the only mode I did calibrate)
* Cinema 2 mode: 668 lumens
* Video mode: 678 lumens
* Natural mode: 709 lumens

Remember, if you don't need all that muscle (brightness), drop into low power mode, and your lamp will last longer (3000 hours vs 2000 - approximately), and the lumen count should drop about 27%. For example, that would mean Cinema 1 mode would be about 511 lumens, etc.

By any measure, that is truly bright, with the Optoma HD72, the next brightest projector, in its best mode with full lamp power measured at only 518 lumens, and close to 1400 lumens when the Optoma was pushed to the limit (and uncalbrated) Panasonic gets a WOW rating for brightness, even in its best movie modes.

Given that your room is fully light controlled, and the fact that the projector has no shortage of lumens, I'd personally be inclined to mount it in the 18-20' range if you're using a ceiling mount. That would give you very nice image quality while not sacrificing too much brightness.
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post #2073 of 2849 Old 09-04-2007, 07:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CuriousDME View Post

Hello Adi, I am new to this whole forum thing, but found your posts (as well as several other members posts) regarding DIY screens very informative and encouraging because I have young children and a more limited budget than perhaps many other members. That said, I was all ready to purchase a sheet of Wilson Art DW and make a supporting frame, untill I saw your post of 09-29-06, which included the following quote and series of images:



This section showed each of 3 groups of pictures demonstrating Rustoleum Metalic paint quite obviously superior to the DW laminate. But since Rustoleum makes six (6) different metallic formulations in Silver Metallic alone(!), could you provide the product SKU number for the one used in those screenshots and briefly describe your most successful method of application of this paint?

I plan on purchasing a Panasonic PT-AX100U (affordable for me, and has seemingly excellent user reviews - price vs. quality) to use with my DIY screen in a viewing room 25' long by 11' wide with no windows and controllable recessed can lighting. So I have ONE additional question: With a maximum ceiling height of 7'-4" what might be an optimum distance from the screen to the lens to project a 16:9 image to a 120" diagonal screen? Thank you again for sharing your knowledge. signed, Dave

Huh? You do know you're in the laminate thread, right?

mech
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post #2074 of 2849 Old 09-04-2007, 12:35 PM
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Thanks to cynical2 for the valuable and informative input to my first post. It is refreshing to have persons previously unknown willing to share their knowledge and experience with a novice like myself. Thanks again.

As for my being in the wrong "thread" and directing questions to member Adi about screen paint, I can only offer the fact that I have never before responded to or been part of any user Forum (which I clearly stated) and was unaware that there were "specific" threads in which I "needed" to direct my post, since I had found this forum through a general web search regarding alternative screen materials. Additionally, I thought my post was "in line" with Adi's post which mentioned screen paint. Seems like I better not make that mistake again!

As far as laminates go, I am a custom builder by trade and have worked personally with plastic laminates, solid surface materials and paint coatings (including some that cause death in 15 minutes if mistakenly put into any mucus membrane) for nearly twenty-five (25) years in every one of my building or remodeling jobs. I was a field tester for Dupont Corian "seamless" joint compound. And before anyone asks, no, I have not tried to use any solid surface material (Corian, Avonite, ect.) for a projection screen. Although - because most solid surface materials are basically impervious to chemical cleaners (including HCl acid at about 10% concentration) and things like paint and permanent markers can be removed easily with Acetone and any light surface scratches can be removed with the proper micron graded sanding disks ("paper"), the solid surface "laminate" idea idea does merit some investigation. One additional benefit to the solid surface idea, is that the sheen level of the surface can be changed from a glass like gloss to nearly dead flat by using various micron graded sanding with a RO (random orbital) sander, which would readily alter the reflective characteristics of such a solid surface screen to a uniform sheen. But I can already see that the higher cost and weight of the material, even with "wet wall" thickness grades of 1/4", might put people off considering this type of "laminate" material. Shipping must be by truck freight only and is costly as well as the investment costs for the special fabrication tools that are needed. [But true met-Acrylics can be heat formed to a permanent curve!!!]

But lest I stray from the "laminate" thread ever so slightly, I recall someone who apparently damaged his screen gloss level in trying to remove a marking pen (apparently) spot on his laminate sheet by using a mild abrasive (I think it was baking soda). I wished I had found this forum earlier to prevent the various spot removal steps that caused this damage, but alas, I did not. But maybe the following advice will help others avoid this same mistake.

All plastic laminate has a wear layer of clear resin over the top of the paper layer that is the color (or color and pattern combos used most commonly) for most counter-top and post-forming grades commonly available. [As an aside, some laminates even use a metal or cloth layer (copper etc.) for the color/patten and wear-layer, with or without the clear resin top coating.] Once this wear layer is penetrated, you find yourself into the color (and/or pattern layer) and any further abrasion, even with the mildest abrasives, could ultimately penetrate through the color layer to the phenolic plastic/paper base layers that we know have long called Formica because it was the first widely sold plastic laminate sheet material.

None-the-less, once the surface "wear layer" has been altered, the damage is done. That said, the best method for paint or marking pen removal is with the commonly available Acetone. Do not ever use MEK (which is a blend) or other solvent chemicals as they can damage the poly resin layer by reacting chemically and can cause lung damage even in short exposures as well as leaving a residue on the cleaned surface. And Acetone, unlike most other solvents, is actually manufactured by the human body itself, so limited exposure (i.e., skin contact and some vapor) will not be harmful and is actually used to contact "kill" common skin warts or genital warts (which are nothing more than one of several herpes viruses - there are 13 in number). But BEWARE - Acetone evaporates VERY, VERY quickly, and can overpower a closed breathing environment RAPIDLY, and it will ignite instantly with arc or flame. Also, use only white or natural color cotton rag because Acetone will remove all the dye from colored rags (and impart it to your laminate) and melt some synthetic materials and impart the sticky synthetic to the surface. A last point, Acetone can also damage some of the laminate poly resin coatings if in contact to long or with too high hand rubbing pressure and course cloth texture (a type of abrasive, as well). Since the wear layer is finely textured in the matte finishes (especially) in order to break up reflected light and hide fingerprints and mild surface scratches (its designed purpose) the alteration of the texture ultimately changes its refractive and thus reflective levels. A series of wet momentary wiping works well, but bear in mind that highly textured, i.e., very low sheen surfaces have thousands of tiny valleys that can fill up with things like permanent marking fluid or grease pen which is also frequently used to mark laminate sheets (in the cutting or shipment procedures) and may require the material to be laid flat and momentarily flooded with Acetone and blotted up. Try the wet wiping first.

Hope that lengthy discourse will help some that have had the accidental marking pen or paint blemish. signed Dave
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post #2075 of 2849 Old 09-04-2007, 01:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CuriousDME View Post

Thanks to cynical2 for the valuable and informative input to my first post. It is refreshing to have persons previously unknown willing to share their knowledge and experience with a novice like myself. Thanks again.

As for my being in the wrong "thread" and directing questions to member Adi about screen paint, I can only offer the fact that I have never before responded to or been part of any user Forum (which I clearly stated) and was unaware that there were "specific" threads in which I "needed" to direct my post, since I had found this forum through a general web search regarding alternative screen materials. Additionally, I thought my post was "in line" with Adi's post which mentioned screen paint. Seems like I better not make that mistake again!

As far as laminates go, I am a custom builder by trade and have worked personally with plastic laminates, solid surface materials and paint coatings (including some that cause death in 15 minutes if mistakenly put into any mucus membrane) for nearly twenty-five (25) years in every one of my building or remodeling jobs. I was a field tester for Dupont Corian "seamless" joint compound. And before anyone asks, no, I have not tried to use any solid surface material (Corian, Avonite, ect.) for a projection screen. Although - because most solid surface materials are basically impervious to chemical cleaners (including HCl acid at about 10% concentration) and things like paint and permanent markers can be removed easily with Acetone and any light surface scratches can be removed with the proper micron graded sanding disks ("paper"), the solid surface "laminate" idea idea does merit some investigation. One additional benefit to the solid surface idea, is that the sheen level of the surface can be changed from a glass like gloss to nearly dead flat by using various micron graded sanding with a RO (random orbital) sander, which would readily alter the reflective characteristics of such a solid surface screen to a uniform sheen. But I can already see that the higher cost and weight of the material, even with "wet wall" thickness grades of 1/4", might put people off considering this type of "laminate" material. Shipping must be by truck freight only and is costly as well as the investment costs for the special fabrication tools that are needed. [But true met-Acrylics can be heat formed to a permanent curve!!!]

But lest I stray from the "laminate" thread ever so slightly, I recall someone who apparently damaged his screen gloss level in trying to remove a marking pen (apparently) spot on his laminate sheet by using a mild abrasive (I think it was baking soda). I wished I had found this forum earlier to prevent the various spot removal steps that caused this damage, but alas, I did not. But maybe the following advice will help others avoid this same mistake.

All plastic laminate has a wear layer of clear resin over the top of the paper layer that is the color (or color and pattern combos used most commonly) for most counter-top and post-forming grades commonly available. [As an aside, some laminates even use a metal or cloth layer (copper etc.) for the color/patten and wear-layer, with or without the clear resin top coating.] Once this wear layer is penetrated, you find yourself into the color (and/or pattern layer) and any further abrasion, even with the mildest abrasives, could ultimately penetrate through the color layer to the phenolic plastic/paper base layers that we know have long called Formica because it was the first widely sold plastic laminate sheet material.

None-the-less, once the surface "wear layer" has been altered, the damage is done. That said, the best method for paint or marking pen removal is with the commonly available Acetone. Do not ever use MEK (which is a blend) or other solvent chemicals as they can damage the poly resin layer by reacting chemically and can cause lung damage even in short exposures as well as leaving a residue on the cleaned surface. And Acetone, unlike most other solvents, is actually manufactured by the human body itself, so limited exposure (i.e., skin contact and some vapor) will not be harmful and is actually used to contact "kill" common skin warts or genital warts (which are nothing more than one of several herpes viruses - there are 13 in number). But BEWARE - Acetone evaporates VERY, VERY quickly, and can overpower a closed breathing environment RAPIDLY, and it will ignite instantly with arc or flame. Also, use only white or natural color cotton rag because Acetone will remove all the dye from colored rags (and impart it to your laminate) and melt some synthetic materials and impart the sticky synthetic to the surface. A last point, Acetone can also damage some of the laminate poly resin coatings if in contact to long or with too high hand rubbing pressure and course cloth texture (a type of abrasive, as well). Since the wear layer is finely textured in the matte finishes (especially) in order to break up reflected light and hide fingerprints and mild surface scratches (its designed purpose) the alteration of the texture ultimately changes its refractive and thus reflective levels. A series of wet momentary wiping works well, but bear in mind that highly textured, i.e., very low sheen surfaces have thousands of tiny valleys that can fill up with things like permanent marking fluid or grease pen which is also frequently used to mark laminate sheets (in the cutting or shipment procedures) and may require the material to be laid flat and momentarily flooded with Acetone and blotted up. Try the wet wiping first.

Hope that lengthy discourse will help some that have had the accidental marking pen or paint blemish. signed Dave

You sound like someone I know, but I can't quite put my finger on it...

mech
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post #2076 of 2849 Old 09-04-2007, 08:38 PM
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I just ordered the Mits HC1500 and have decided to use the wilson art DW laminate for the screen. How is the best way to mount this on the wall without glueing it to the wall? Thanks for any help!
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post #2077 of 2849 Old 09-04-2007, 08:41 PM
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Hey Clarence - I see that you used the black veltex ribbon for the laminate screen you built back when this thread was young . Does this product appear to be the same thing?

http://factorydirectcraft.com/catalo...oducts_id=9846

For a no hassle screen project, it seems like DW, a simple frame, and some Veltex ribbon can't be beat.....

I'll be building my screen soon - this forum has been priceless! Thanks to all who have shared their efforts here!

btl.
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post #2078 of 2849 Old 09-04-2007, 08:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CuriousDME View Post

But lest I stray from the "laminate" thread ever so slightly, I recall someone who apparently damaged his screen gloss level in trying to remove a marking pen (apparently) spot on his laminate sheet by using a mild abrasive (I think it was baking soda). I wished I had found this forum earlier to prevent the various spot removal steps that caused this damage, but alas, I did not. But maybe the following advice will help others avoid this same mistake.

Yep the laminate was damaged but the mark which I thought was a sharpie (that's what it looks like) seemed to actually be a black spot in the laminate itself. Took it back to the store and they agreeded it was a manufacturing defect. Waiting on the new piece to arrive now.

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post #2079 of 2849 Old 09-05-2007, 07:12 AM
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Cleaning up "sharpie" marks with acetone will require a LOT more rubbing than the Goof-Off or Oppps products, which do not appear to damage the laminates at all....


Jim White
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post #2080 of 2849 Old 09-12-2007, 07:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bialio View Post

Hey Clarence - I see that you used the black veltex ribbon for the laminate screen you built back when this thread was young . Does this product appear to be the same thing?

http://factorydirectcraft.com/catalo...oducts_id=9846

For a no hassle screen project, it seems like DW, a simple frame, and some Veltex ribbon can't be beat...

Yep... "Black Veltex"... that looks like the same stuff I used...
Quote:
Originally Posted by factorydirect.com View Post

Black Veltex Velvet 2-5/8" x 25 yard Ribbon Spool
[V40BK] $4.99

Item# V40BK Black Veltex Ribbon. Size: #40 2-5/8"w x 25 yards spool-Waterproof- indoor / outdoor use. Very rich in color.

Great stuff... sucks up all light. Can't beat the price... $5 for 25 yards... you won't even need half of that for a large screen.
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post #2081 of 2849 Old 09-12-2007, 07:44 PM
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I just used the Veltex ribbon, and yes, it's awesome!!!

The Moderno Theatre! Slideshow (here, and here!)
Pixar screenplay slideshows here!
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post #2082 of 2849 Old 09-12-2007, 08:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gnolivos View Post

I just used the Veltex ribbon, and yes, it's awesome!!!

What did you use to adhere it to the screen?
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post #2083 of 2849 Old 09-12-2007, 08:16 PM
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I used double-sided scotch tape. But I put it today, so no idea if it will last... it's a nice thin tape though, not that thick double-sided foam from 3M. Thin is better.

The Moderno Theatre! Slideshow (here, and here!)
Pixar screenplay slideshows here!
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post #2084 of 2849 Old 09-13-2007, 10:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clarence View Post

Yep... "Black Veltex"... that looks like the same stuff I used...Great stuff... sucks up all light. Can't beat the price... $5 for 25 yards... you won't even need half of that for a large screen.

So 25 yds should do a 106" 16:9 screen with ~3.5" wide frame, wrapped like this: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=865218 ?
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post #2085 of 2849 Old 09-13-2007, 11:13 AM
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The veltex ribbon isn't wide enough to wrap like that post shows. It's only 2 5/8" wide - so not really workable for wrapping. I think most people (me included) are just using this as a flat layer glued or attached to the top of the screen.

btl.
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post #2086 of 2849 Old 09-13-2007, 11:49 AM
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FYI - for cutting my laminate I used "Laminate Shears"

http://www.klenktools.com/Main/Produ...sNew.asp?fro=Y

I picked up the $25 version - they had it at my Lowes. Made the cutting super easy, and didn't involve scoring or power tools or saws.

btl.
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post #2087 of 2849 Old 09-13-2007, 12:09 PM
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As much as I would like to pick up a $25 tool to cut my laminate, I don't have any use for it after. I hope I can just use my existing shears.

===================================
My Riser | My LED Star Ceiling | My HTPC Build
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post #2088 of 2849 Old 09-13-2007, 12:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bialio View Post

The veltex ribbon isn't wide enough to wrap like that post shows. It's only 2 5/8" wide - so not really workable for wrapping. I think most people (me included) are just using this as a flat layer glued or attached to the top of the screen.

btl.

Oooh, glad I asked. Thanks!
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post #2089 of 2849 Old 09-15-2007, 03:17 PM
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I went to Menard's today and got a quote for the DW and confirmed that the code was D354-60. However, they say they only have one thickness and its what's used on both the counter and the side. It seems pretty sturdy though, but just wondered if anyone knew how to tell which one it might be.

I was surprised to find that they had other sizes than 4 x 8 or 5 x 10. I got a quote for a sheet of 5' x 8' since I'm only wanting a 103" diagonal 16:9 screen whose dimensions come out just slightly taller than 4' but well under 8' and had been worried I had to buy a 5' x 10'!

Anyway, here in Iowa at Menards', I got a price of $96.50 for a 5' x 8' sheet that included shipping to my house. Seemed like a pretty good deal, but wasn't quite ready to pull the trigger since I'm early in my theater build. Oh, and it was definately a first for them when I was just interested in ordering the laminate and explained what I wanted it for... Guess not too many people in Cedar Rapids doing DIY home theaters.
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post #2090 of 2849 Old 09-17-2007, 11:12 AM
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WAIT -- try Home Depot. I just ordered a 5x8 sheet of Fashion Gray from the Home Depot in Cedar Rapids about a week and half ago. Price came to $64.00 + tax. Still waiting for my sheet to come in -- you may be able to get yours quicker, since I think Designer White might be one of the colors they stock.

*Edit* Note - that price did not include shipping to my home, it'll go to the store and I'll pick it up there.
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post #2091 of 2849 Old 09-17-2007, 11:33 AM
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Thanks for the tip. I'll definately check it out before ordering. Menard's just said that it would be delivered to my house for that price... didn't really give me a choice.. But, since my understanding is that it comes rolled, I should be able to get it home easily enough if it saves me $30!
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post #2092 of 2849 Old 09-19-2007, 10:49 AM
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Update -- my sheet of Fashion Gray came in yesterday! Picked it up, and with a little bit of effort, got it loaded into the car (it was rolled up, but the box was still 14" x 14" x 62" - a bit unwieldy). It's marked with "381" in grease pen at one corner; no markings indicating finish, but it sure looks like the "60" matte. I had one chip about 2" x 1/4" on one of the long edges, but that won't be a problem for my 106" 16:9 screen... in fact, I measured the sheet to be 97 1/4" x 61 1/4" , so I guess the chip is on part of the sheet that I didn't even have to pay for!

Hope to get it framed up and mounted this weekend...
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post #2093 of 2849 Old 09-19-2007, 11:23 AM
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so, these ship rolled?

I had assumed I would have to borrow my brother's truck for the 5x10 sheet I'll be getting in a few weeks, but if it can be rolled, I should be able to get it into the back of my 4runner with it sticking out the back window a bit.
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post #2094 of 2849 Old 09-19-2007, 10:19 PM
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Yes,

My 5'x10' Fashion Gray came in a box the size described above. Be sure to inspect the box and/or laminate carefully before leaving the store or accepting home delivery. Although the laminate is pretty tough, it can be damaged during shipping.

Good luck with your new screen!

Mike
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post #2095 of 2849 Old 09-20-2007, 11:38 AM
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Just ordered my 8 x5 DW; interesting range of pries at various HDs across the country. Mine was $90.00. I have to go to a 3rd party "counter-place" and pick it up or else pay $70.00 for delivery. Now that I think about it, probably should have gotten it direct from them in the first place. Oh well.. not too worried about it.

The woman at Lowes asked if I wanted the "thin sheet" or the "thicker sheet". She said the thick sheet came flat and the thin one came rolled, so I got the thin one, thinking that's what folks are using. Is that right?

"I was just speculatin' about a hypothesis. I know I don't know nothin'."
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post #2096 of 2849 Old 09-20-2007, 11:51 AM
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Am I correct that the thicker/more rigid backing I put this on, the less warping and bending and all of that?

"I was just speculatin' about a hypothesis. I know I don't know nothin'."
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post #2097 of 2849 Old 09-20-2007, 01:47 PM
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most of us are using the "thicker" and it also comes rolled.... I would be a bit scared of something thinner !


Jim White
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post #2098 of 2849 Old 09-20-2007, 04:54 PM
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I am confused... I specifically asked the woman how the 2 sheets came... she said only the thinner one came rolled... the thicker sheet she said only comes flat. She also said the one I ordered was the "general one... the one used for countertops".

I wonder if I should cancel/change my order?

"I was just speculatin' about a hypothesis. I know I don't know nothin'."
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post #2099 of 2849 Old 10-08-2007, 10:39 PM
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Hey guys, I need some help with selecting a front projector for my new setup that I'm planning on using a 8' x 5' piece of DW laminate for my screen.

Quick and dirty details:

I'm looking to add a simple front projection setup in my unfinished basement. I'm not a front projection noob, this will be my second, and my previous home had a 119" setup 3yrs ago.

Anyway, my family and I do the bulk of our HD viewing on a 56" DLP in the family room or a 50" DLP in the master bedroom, but sometimes I long for my "cave" where I could go to watch Sunday Ticket by myself without noise from the kids, or perhaps crank up the Xbox late at night and not worry about the sound waking everyone up.

So, I've got the ceiling figured out (black fabric stapled to the joists), the walls (picked up 60 linear feet of used office partitions off of Craigslist for better sound quality to make a "room"), and a large piece of carpet remenant for the flooring (space is 13ft wide, 17ft deep).

Not wanting to spend much money this go around (unlike my last setup that was completely finished off), I've decided to go the DIY route on the screen to save $1k (my previous DLP setup I had a DaLite 119" High Contrast Cinema Vision screen material, along with their Cinema Contour frame w/ pro trim).

What I'm stuck on is projector selection. Perhaps those of you using laminate for your screen material can give me a few suggestions on recommended projectors? The setup will be used for Xbox 360 gaming half of the time, the other half watching HD via my HR-20 DVR from D*. 1080p is not in the plans right now, maybe later on if I finish off the basement and would want to potentially upgrade (plus, I have no 1080p source material at this time, everything I watch is network or pay TV HD @ 720p/1080i).

I'm wanting to stay under $1250 street price for the PJ itself, and I've given the Sanyo Z5 a good look. However, LCD scares me after shopping them a few year's back. I'm sure they're better now with the screen door and all, but I loved my old DLP InFocus front projector and love my current pair of DLP rear projectors.

Is anyone using a budget 720p LCD projector with a laminate screen that can give me feedback, or should I just go straight for the 720p DLP's in the same price range as the Z5 (ie. Optoma HD70, InFocus 7210, Mits HC1500, Epson Cinema 400, etc)?

One concern I have with either technology is dust, since this won't be installed in a finished area of the home. Do these LCD units have filters that need to be cleaned, or have they gone to sealed light systems like DLP technology?

Thanks for taking the time to read my post if you made it this far, I'd appreciate any suggestions on projector selection. I promise to post pictures of the "room" and screen setup as I go along (carpet and office partitions are already done, speakers wired, now it's time to order the projector online and and build the screen while I wait for delivery). I don't want to start an off-topic DLP vs LCD debate, I'm just hoping that some of you can share your experiences with any of the PJ's that I mentioned above.
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post #2100 of 2849 Old 10-08-2007, 11:13 PM
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Hey Jdiehl,

My buddy lives in O'fallon, I live in Fenton!

I have almost the exact set up as you! I did fabric on the ceiling and felt to cover the walls, just gotta pick up a carpet remnant.. Anyways I bought the Acer PH530 which throws a great pic for $600 but does come with some quirks, softer image and mainly for me is the reseting of some of the personal settings everytime I switch channels and now it is defaulting back to original settings everytime I shut it off, so I have to flip the image because I have it ceiling mounted so it gets very frustrating to say the least.. Anyways my brother is buying the Acer from me for gaming purposes and I went ahead with the Marantz VP4001 from secondact.com. For the price you really cant go wrong. Check out this thread http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=885398

My .02
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