"Floating" BOC Screen - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 20 Old 08-27-2007, 03:18 PM - Thread Starter
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Finally got a chance to put up my screen over the weekend.

Basically a simple 85"x48" BOC screen with a frame made of 1x3's.



The real fun was mounting it to the wall with some hardware that I found at Lowes so that it "floats" about 4" out from the wall.



The mounting hardware for each bracket is made up of two pieces which slide together bolted along a slider in the middle. this allows for the screen to be adjusted by about 2" forward or backward at any of the corners by simply loosening the bolt, adjusting the screen and then re-tightening the bolt thus no need to take down the screen to make minor adjustments to "true" up the screen to the projector.

Best part is, the entire cost of the screen materials + mounting hardware was about $38.



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post #2 of 20 Old 08-27-2007, 04:13 PM
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Looks great! How about some close-ups of that mounting hardware?

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post #3 of 20 Old 08-27-2007, 05:26 PM
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I've been trying to get someone to do a floating screen in front of a black backdrop for a while now. Very nice job.

Do you get the feeling the image is floating in space when watching a movie?

I like the idea that your mounting system allows the screen to be tilted. For those of us without lens shift who want to avoid keystone correction the screen could be tilted so the screen is perpendicular to the normal from the projector lens. Have you tried that or do you not need to tilt your projector at all?


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post #4 of 20 Old 08-27-2007, 05:57 PM - Thread Starter
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I'm waiting on delivery of the projector so that was one of the reasons I am glad that the screen can be adjusted. Hopefully I won't need to to but at least the option is there now.

The screen can be adjusted by about 2" on a side using the sliding hardware which does give some leeway for compensating for the position of the projector.

I'll try to take some pictures of the hardware tomorrow but since I don't have any extra pieces I may have to take the screen down in order to get the pictures. (I should have thought about taking them before I put it up, doh!)


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post #5 of 20 Old 08-27-2007, 07:18 PM
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Great job. I have been considering a floating screen. I've read about doing a french cleat (ripping a 2X4) but seems like having the hardware would make it adjustable. I do not have a projector with lens shift/keystone correction so I think this may be the answer in my case.

I've thought about using a velvet border on the wall to help catch any overspill. The other thing about a floating screen may be to use velvet to make an adjustable mask.

I would be interested in your pictures of the hardware to see how you did it. Thanks
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post #6 of 20 Old 08-28-2007, 12:27 PM - Thread Starter
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OK, I took a few pictures of the hardware I used while the screen was still up on the wall.

Here is a shot of it from the side, brackets mostly closed:



And here is the same piece at about maximum extension (although not secured):



Finally here is an image from the top looking down:



These are inexpensive brackets made for mounting blinds.

As you can see, the brackets have channels molded into them and long narrow openings running down their length which make them ideal for this type of application.

The mount is made up of two of the exact same bracket. One is bolted to the wall and the other to the screen. Once all eight pieces have been secured to the correct positions on both the screen and the wall, the screen should simply slide forward onto the wall brackets.

Once it is up, you adjust the screen to the desired position and run a simple bolt and wing nut through the holes to lock it in place.


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post #7 of 20 Old 08-28-2007, 07:37 PM
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Thanks for the pictures. I leaning toward painting MDF but would like to do the brackets. I haven't found any strong enough yet.
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post #8 of 20 Old 08-28-2007, 07:50 PM - Thread Starter
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These are made of steel and fairly strong. I could have easily just used one to hold up the screen but of course needed at least four to keep it level and to make it adjustable.

I also made certain that I anchored them in the wall studs with 3" wood screws.

While I understand that MDF is heavy stuff, depending upon the weight of the screen in question you could simply add more sets (4, 6, 8, Etc.) as needed to guarantee stability.

Of course how feasible that is depends entirely on the size, weight and thickness of the board that you wish to use.


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post #9 of 20 Old 03-17-2008, 10:51 PM
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Wow, sorry I was so late to the thread, but that "floating design" is awesome man! Way to think outside the box!

In terms of LFE, size does matter!
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post #10 of 20 Old 03-18-2008, 03:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luclin999 View Post

Finally got a chance to put up my screen over the weekend.

Basically a simple 85"x48" BOC screen with a frame made of 1x3's.



The real fun was mounting it to the wall with some hardware that I found at Lowes so that it "floats" about 4" out from the wall.



The mounting hardware for each bracket is made up of two pieces which slide together bolted along a slider in the middle. this allows for the screen to be adjusted by about 2" forward or backward at any of the corners by simply loosening the bolt, adjusting the screen and then re-tightening the bolt thus no need to take down the screen to make minor adjustments to "true" up the screen to the projector.

Best part is, the entire cost of the screen materials + mounting hardware was about $38.


How did you staple the screen to the back where the metal brackets are?
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post #11 of 20 Old 03-20-2008, 05:57 AM
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I have done a similar thing accept I used the hangman to hang the screen on the wall. This allows some horizontal adjustment of the screen. I was wondering if you have any light spill? I am finding that I have a small amount of light spill. No one that has come over has been able to see it until I point it out. With the lights off, you have to really look to see it. I think that I might be able to minimize this further by rebuilding the screen out of some better wood (right now it is made of pine that is already somewhat warped). I also thought about doing a border. My concern is that I will be able to see the border on my eggshell black wall. So for those of you that have a border, with the lights out, can you distinguish the border from the wall? Thanks
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post #12 of 20 Old 03-20-2008, 11:11 AM
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Looks Kwl

Do you have your image right to the edge of the screen, or do you have a small margin ??

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post #13 of 20 Old 04-23-2008, 04:53 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:


How did you staple the screen to the back where the metal brackets are?

There is actually enough space around the brackets to allow for the staples to secure the fabric.

Quote:


I was wondering if you have any light spill?

Quote:


Do you have your image right to the edge of the screen, or do you have a small margin ??

Right now the image fills the screen except for roughly one inch on each side due to where the projector has to be placed at the moment.

Once I get around to relocating the projector, the added throw distance should allow me to fill the screen completely, hopefully without much in the way of light spill.


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post #14 of 20 Old 04-24-2008, 01:26 PM
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Was it hard getting the fabric really tight around the frame? I just called joanns and will be picking up some Blackout fabric tomorrow.
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post #15 of 20 Old 04-24-2008, 01:32 PM
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Here is a link to a very nice demonstration of how to make a BOC screen.

It includes some very specific instructions on how to stretch and staple the cloth to the frame.


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post #16 of 20 Old 04-25-2008, 09:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tiddler View Post

Here is a link to a very nice demonstration of how to make a BOC screen.

It includes some very specific instructions on how to stretch and staple the cloth to the frame.

That is the tutorial I used to make my original BOC screen with wood frame. I modified some of the construction design but not much. The key is that BOC is rather rubbery and can be stretched fairly aggressively when stapling.

The updated screen I made a few months ago used the same frame concept but with Sheerweave 4500 AT cloth instead. This stuff doesn't really stretch at all and was WAY more difficult to get tight. Were it not for having a friend doing stapling while I cranked on the fabric, it never would have been tight. I had no trouble getting BOC stretched tight working on my own.

Cheers!
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post #17 of 20 Old 04-25-2008, 10:48 AM - Thread Starter
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I basically used the same stapling pattern as the one shown in the link above.


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post #18 of 20 Old 04-28-2008, 11:44 AM
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I have been thinking about floating my screen using wires across the top and bottom then covering the wires with black velvet. In the dark it would give the illusion of the screen floating in space.
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post #19 of 20 Old 05-01-2008, 01:42 PM
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I hung the screen I detailed above at about a 15 degree angle from the back wall as it's in the corner of a multipurpose room in the basement. It is hung with "invisible picture hanging wire" (fishing line) I got at Home Depot. There are two hooks screwed into ceiling joists and two eye screws into the top of the frame. It works great. I don't know that it really has that much of a "floating in space" effect but maybe that's just because I'm used to it.

Cheers!
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post #20 of 20 Old 09-14-2009, 07:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tiddler View Post

Here is a link to a very nice demonstration of how to make a BOC screen.

It includes some very specific instructions on how to stretch and staple the cloth to the frame.

Thank the Lord I found this thread and post before I tried to figure it out myself. I followed the demo (mostly), and my BOC screen turned out GREAT!
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