HDTV Screen – High Quality and Very Low Cost - Page 19 - AVS Forum
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post #541 of 1284 Old 09-19-2002, 11:29 AM
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Has anyone heard of a plastic product called "Sintra"?

I found a place in Kitchener Ontario that has 4x8 sheets for $35 CAN.
3mm thick, white, opaque, and very little sheen. I have yet to see it.

Has anyone tried this for a screen? Does it compare to the Parkland stuff?

Thanks

juka
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post #542 of 1284 Old 09-24-2002, 08:32 PM
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I am going to try the formica idea in an early post, as I have laminated many things just need samples to test out as it is a realyy FLAT surface
cost about $40-50 a sheet 4x8 depending where you live.

Will also wont scratch or dent....
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post #543 of 1284 Old 10-01-2002, 05:51 PM
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Anyone have a sku # for the Parkland Platice as both Lowe's & Home Depot did not appear to carry them in Cleveland, Ohio. Might have better luck with a sku#.
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post #544 of 1284 Old 10-01-2002, 10:53 PM
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I found this on a search of SKU:

Plaiming wrote this.

Quote:
Just for the records and anyone searching. Heres the skus/upcs ive compiled from other posts and my own research. bear in mind, these skus might not be correct for stores across the country, but my guess is that they are.

Parkland Plastics


UPC #: 637553000012
Home Depot SKU is: #179-646
Lowes SKU is: #72405

-paul


Dawn
Thanks guys!
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post #545 of 1284 Old 10-04-2002, 02:09 PM
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Can somebody suggest how I'm supposed to cut the material when I get it? I don't have any tools apart from a cutco knife and a pair of scissors, nor can I really afford any.

Can Home Depot cut it to a specific size? What size would I want to cut it to if I want a 16x9 screen that is as big as possible from a 4x8 piece? Do I need to leave room for framing or are people attaching frames to the outside?

-Mike Lindberg-
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post #546 of 1284 Old 10-05-2002, 08:15 AM
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Mike
The material feels very much like thin linoleum. If you have anything that can cut that, then this material should be no problem. Razor knife, good pair of scissors, sheet metal scissors, tin snips, just about anything will cut this stuff. Granted, it would be a lot of work with just any ordinary pair of scissors.

-Good luck.
-Juno =0)

For I AM PERSUADED...Rom. 8:38-39
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post #547 of 1284 Old 10-06-2002, 12:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Juno
The material feels very much like thin linoleum. If you have anything that can cut that, then this material should be no problem. Razor knife, good pair of scissors, sheet metal scissors, tin snips, just about anything will cut this stuff. Granted, it would be a lot of work with just any ordinary pair of scissors.

Thanks. Looks like I'll have to invest in some kind of cutting device. I'll probably ask at Home Depot once I go.

-Mike Lindberg-
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post #548 of 1284 Old 10-06-2002, 07:59 AM
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We kept our 4 X 8 sheet at 4 x 8 for the 2.35 ratio movies. We didn't frame it. I'm making curtains to mask out the screen, instead. Then we decided to go 5 X 10 (special order) so we can go BIG. Well, that is good when my hubby sits in his "office" seat 19 ft away, but at 12 ft, it was too big, so I'll zoom the pj screen down and pull the curtains in when I sit close. So make your system flexible. We can even mask out a 4:3 screen, and that is nice for sports.

Dawn
Thanks guys!
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post #549 of 1284 Old 10-07-2002, 05:41 AM
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Mike,
You don't need any special tools to cut it, I used regular scissors to cut mine. The material is very soft and cuts easily.

John
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post #550 of 1284 Old 10-07-2002, 12:33 PM
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I was able to buy a 4 x 8 sheet of the plastic at Home Depot in So CA - ~$18 with taxes etc.

It rolls up nicely so carrying in the car was not a problem.

Cuts easily using a utility knife.

I cut mine to 64" by 48" to match my projector's 1.33 ratio. I am going to use a PC to drive the projector & it will provide the letter boxing, etc.

I projected a movie such that it was half on the white wall & half on the plastic. There was relatively little difference in brightness or color saturation. The nod goes to the plastic, but just barely.

I tried butting & taping (on the back side) two pieces of the plastic together & was surprised that the seam was almost invisible. Might be an answer for people who want bigger screens. But the seam may bother others.

Now a question:
Years ago I used a 3M product that was added to paint to provide reflection at night. (Similar to stripes on the road).

Has anyone tried this approach?

Thanks

Snowman
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post #551 of 1284 Old 10-10-2002, 07:27 AM
 
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Has anyone done a side by side (or top and bottom) comparison of the gain on one of these DIY plastic screens to another screen with a gain value assigned to it? Anyone have an accurate gain value to give it?
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post #552 of 1284 Old 10-13-2002, 10:37 AM
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Not accurate. I've READ 1.0 gain, same as white wall.

Interestingly, we ended up with a big wave right in the middle of our 10 X 5 screen. (The material gapped up in the middle of the top support rod.) We're going to take it apart and fix it, but the picture doesn't seem to be affected at our narrow viewing angles. FWIW.

Dawn
Thanks guys!
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post #553 of 1284 Old 10-14-2002, 11:02 AM
 
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I got the following at LOWE'S

3 - PIPE 1" X 10'
4 - ELL SCH 40 (pipe right angle connectors)
1 - GL.ONE&ONLY INT.F (FLAT BLACK PAINT. ONE GALLON.)
1 - LAMINATE WHITE 4 (FREMICA )

Total Cost: $ 63.94

The Ploywall by Parkland (I didn't check but same scew #) was precut and had imprints in the shape of tiny dots in little places all over each one on the smooth sides. They were also very dirty so I went with the Fermica. I covered it with two soft cotton blankets and then a large heavy rug to keep it from being attacked by my cat. I plan on using right angle brakets into holes I will drill on the back of the PVC piping to hide them. I will split each pipe to insert the screen inside but I'm going to test this idea first on an extra section of the PVC I use for the sides.
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post #554 of 1284 Old 10-16-2002, 07:19 AM
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Quote:


Originally posted by miscrms
Update:
Through DoItBest.com I was able to order 2 sheets of the 4x8 Parkland Poly-Wall at Heldt Lumber in Phoenix. I'll have it on Monday and it was $18 per sheet, no shipping Hey as long as your being cheap you might as well go all the way right?

I checked the doitbest.com website using polywall as my search, found it, then gave it my zip code to find dealers in my area. Funny thing is it did find a dealer, and it was a very small lumber yard in a nearby small town. Called them, ordered two sheets for $18 each, no shipping, and a delivery date of 3 business days! This was after visiting both the local Lowe's and Home Depot, and of course neither had any ideal what it was, nor interested in ordering it for me.

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post #555 of 1284 Old 10-17-2002, 12:35 PM
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i just ordered from parkland plastics ...its crazy they already knew what i wanted it for i ordered the 5/8 one is it the same way to set it up even if its bigger ? please let me know thx
ps. after i orderd it i read the do it best thread an used it come to find out they have it at a local small ware house by my moms house for like 13. bucks ..doh but only 4/8 were do i get the frames an how should i ask for them i dont want to look like an idiot was the name of the frames

"i swing my sword for no one"
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post #556 of 1284 Old 10-18-2002, 02:21 AM
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Ok, thought I was going to do a Da-lite screen, but I decided to pick up a sheet of Polywall just to try it out. It was a major improvement over my old surface (cream colored enamel paint wall ) but I have no idea how I will mount this thing.

What I'd like to do is keep the sheet in its original ratio (2:1) and get some black fabric and mask out the sides. Unfortunately, that means I have to mount this big wobbly thing on the wall. I was thinking of doing a single board on the top back of the sheet nailed, and getting some kind of hook (could just be more nails in the wall) and placing the board on that. Is that realistic for mounting on the wall? It sounds a little flimsy to me, and I don't know if I want it sticking out like that.

Unfortunately, I don't have any kind of power tools nor do I have the room (for building) or the know-it-all in which to do these complicated mounts I've seen. I can't destroy my walls too much as I live in an apartment (that rules out permanent mounting, and I'll be upgrading in the future), and I don't have that big of a budget (I want to keep it under $50 total, otherwise I'll just toss this sheet and get a Da-lite screen).

Anybody willing to give some hints on some cheap 'n fast mounting? And sorry about this message. I'm not really a do-it-yourself type person, and I hate to sound like I'm begging for help (which I am ). Any help would be appreciated.

Also, another thought I had. Take my 4x8 sheet, put it up on the wall, get four nails, pound them into the corners (no backing, straight into the wall), and then cover up the 5" or so on both sides with the black fabric. Voila! No more nails (edit: should read Not Many Nails. It is late. I'm tired.), perfect mounting, easy removal, and only a minimum amount of damage to the walls. Will an idea like this hold?

-Mike Lindberg-
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post #557 of 1284 Old 10-18-2002, 07:36 AM
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The polywall is so thin it will sag under it's own weight. People usually sandwich it to a solid sheet of something as a backer. It will sag if you nail/screw it every foot. Your hanging idea "board on the back" might work if you glue the whole area.
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post #558 of 1284 Old 10-18-2002, 08:02 AM
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Just thought I'd add my experience building a screen to this incredibly long thread. I used the Polywall (or whatever the correct material is called), ordered directly from the manufacturer, and built a screen that hangs on my fireplace mantel.

1. I started with a 4x8 piece of light 1/2" plywood (birch?). I sawed off 18" from the 8' dimension. After cutting, the Plywood weighed about 33 pounds. I screwed (using LOTS of 2" wood screws) 2x4's in a line across the long dimension. I screwed from the 2x4's into the plywood, but would recommend doing it the opposite way. To these 2x4's , I attached 4 appropriately sized metal L brackets. This created a ledge in the back (consisting of 1.5" of wood protrusion+the metal brackets) that could rest on my mantel.

2. I cut the polywall, using a knife and scissors, to the size of the plywood. After placing the plywood face up on 4 chairs, I applied liquid nails to it in a big rectangle near the edge and in splotches throughout the middle (approx two small tubes worth) and spread it out using a saw-tooth piece of plastic. I placed the polywall on top and rolled it throughly with a paint roller (to removed bubbles or bulges).

3. After allowing it to dry for 6 hours, I placed the screen (which I could now term it), on the mantel. It hung well, but I decided to improve the overall safety by adding legs. To do this, I used 2 pieces of 2x4 that were taller than the distance between the bottom of the screen and the ground (the taller the better), and 2 pieces of 1x4 (1/2" thick) that were equal to or less than the distance between the bottom of the screen and the ground (it is hard to get this exactly right, so best to err on the side of shortness). After making appropriate measurements, I screwed the 1x4's to the 2x4's (creating a part of the legs that was 2" thick). Then, I screwed the 2x4's to the back of the plywood (again, I would recommend screwing from the plywood into these). After adding shims and rubber supports under the legs to create the correct heights, the entire contraption seemed stable.

4. To prevent small displacements from destabilizing the screen, I screwed two small screws through the metal L brackets into the mantel. They provide no support, but restrict horizontal movement.

Observations:

a. The screen works beautifully. There are some bulges that are unavoidable. After about a week, 3 small bubbles formed (probably some chemical reaction of the liquid nails?). However, when watching a movie these sorts of defects are not problematic. They are only noticeable in bright scenes involving smooth horizontal scrolling.

b. The edges of the screen tend to curl. I applied 4 small plastic clamps from Home Depot to the corners and the problem was solved. Ideally, one could find long C-shaped strips of plastic (like those used on some picture frames) that could be applied to the 4 edges.

c. If rebuilding the screen, I would do a couple of things differently. I would screw from the plywood into the 2x4's instead of vice versa. When I glue the screen on, I would place the entire thing upside down with a heavy weight on it to help flatten the screen during drying. A longer drying period (2-3 days) might help as well. It has also been suggested to me that one could build the screen sans plastic and then tack the polywall to it as if it were a wall.

d. The project cost more than it should because I didn't plan it out carefully and used local hardware stores. It is hard to build large projects in a tiny apt as well. I include below a list of all the components used. They should all be available from home depot (except the polywall)

e. 1/2" plywood seemed the only reasonable backing material. Thinner materials flexed too much. The only alternative is gaiter foam- which is hard for me to get.

Parts and tools

1. 4x8 sheet of Polywall (warning: the sheet they sent me was actually bigger than these dimensions, so measure before cutting).
2. 2 small tubes of liquid nails (small project type).
3. 4 metal L-brackets + 10 L bracket nails (they usually come as a kit). The size of the brackets should be the same as the wide dimension of the 2x4 wood.
4. 4-5 feet of 2x4 wood for ledge (can be one or more pieces- but need to carefully align if multiple pieces).
5. Enough additional 2x4 wood to make 2 legs- approx from ground to 1' above the bottom of the screen. The higher the better.
6. 2 pieces of 1x4 wood. Each should be <= to the distance from the ground to the bottom of the screen.
7. 4x8 piece of 1/2" plywood. Find the lightest one you can (birch, etc) and have the store cut it down to size for you.
8. LOTS of 2" wood nails.
9. Power screwdriver. A must.
10. Saw-toothed piece of plastic to spread the liquid nails (I forget the name of this tool).
11. A cheap paint roller with a foam cylinder.
12. A saw if you forget to have the hardware store cut the wood for you.
13. 4 small plastic squeeze clamps or anything else that will press the plastic to the wood.
14. Scissor

It is hard to mess this up. If the dimensions are wrong, just project on a slightly smaller subset of the screen.

I hope this helps streamline the process for others.
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post #559 of 1284 Old 10-18-2002, 08:29 AM
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khalpern, your screen sounds like it should withstand an earthquake
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post #560 of 1284 Old 10-18-2002, 10:29 AM
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Mr Lindberg -

Do NOT tack the polywall to the wall. It will sag within a week or two and you will see the bulges during horizontal pans. Yech!

Also, try projecting onto a half wall/half polywall combination one night. I did and found that I liked the wall much better. There are several hundred happy polywall users who will disagree with me on that one. Since you haven't built the screen yet, you have an opportunity to compare the two approaches.

LOTR is a good film to do this with. The scenes in bag end with Gandalf are excellent as they have a lot of detail. Also watch 'The Others' as it is an extremely dark movie. See how each surface reacts. Good luck!

David

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post #561 of 1284 Old 10-18-2002, 11:37 AM
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Quote:


Originally posted by blitzkreig
khalpern, your screen sounds like it should withstand an earthquake

Or a Hsu subwoofer ... Unfortunately, neither I nor my screen would survive the neighhbors if I got one.
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post #562 of 1284 Old 10-21-2002, 02:30 AM
 
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Just broke my formica screen. I had it hung with duck tape to practice the screen size and it was just hanging from the bottom when I got home. My father showed it to me saging over and said "see I fixed it". I gave him a wierd look and he grinned. I was trying to bend it back to shape. I'm going to get a lecture, and a new formica screen. Just another minor setback.
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post #563 of 1284 Old 10-21-2002, 02:39 AM
 
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Mabie this could be used for a mask.
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post #564 of 1284 Old 10-21-2002, 02:53 AM
 
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Nope....... no good for a mask. I will make a cenema size srceen also. Thats a great idea!
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post #565 of 1284 Old 10-21-2002, 04:35 AM
 
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The cutting went perfect. The weight of the board makes it difficult to cut once you get so far. It snaped off half way when I was going and I'm glad it went the right direction. Cutting by the crack was very frightning as it bounced around and then and then chipped off the crack thankfully on the corrert side of the cut. The aspect ratio is 2.35:1 for the dedication to the Lord Of The Rings prefered ratio. It measures 77" long and 33" high.

Now I'm going to lay this one flat.
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post #566 of 1284 Old 10-21-2002, 07:39 AM
 
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Looks like the cenemascope sreen will be to small. I boought the Pollywall this time becaseu the dempiled side turned out to actually be the shinny side. How I overlooked that last time I do not know. It will be a 45" X 80" screen and this time I know to leave the 5 inces to fit in the PVC. I think I'm going to use the Formica for making some shelf mats.
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post #567 of 1284 Old 10-21-2002, 10:51 AM
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How to make a perfectly rectangular screen with Parkland Plastics material:

1. Get a perfectly square MDF sub-board to the dimensions you require. I was lucky enough to have access to a CNC router and a piece of spoilboard that was native 5' x 12'. I had the sub-board cut to exactly 96" x 54". The thickness of the sub board should be at least 3/8" or more. This is not so much for strength, but for being able to trim with a router or ROtoZip (more about this later).

2. Attach the sub-board to your wall using drywall screws (preferably, hitting studs. Don't skimp on the screws! I put at least 25 in mine. Make sure the board is level and in the right spot of course!

3. Order an OVERSIZED piece of Parkland Plastics material (I ordered the 5' x 10' sheet for my 96" x 54" screen). The parkland plasics material has a shiny edge around the border (which may affect viewing) so you will not want to use this part. The material is in fact a little oversized, but not enough if the sub-board were the same dimension as the ordered material. This extra material will be trimmed off later.

4. Get some contact cement, liquid nails, spray adhesive, or whatever and bond the plastic to the sub-board hanging on the wall. BE SURE TO SMOOTH IT OUT and make darn sure that there is some extra plastic material hanging over the edges of the sub-board.

5. After the glue cures, go get yourself a RotoZip or a standard router with a flush bit attachment (the one with a little roller bearing on the end). I used a RotoZip which has a bit with a solid shaft on the end, rather than fluted all the way. This will allow you to trim off the additional plastic material to the EXACT dimensions of the sub-board. MAKE SURE YOU GO IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION! For the rotozip, I found that I could get a much cleaner cut if I went in the counter-clockwise direction.

6. Clean up the mess!

7. Apply decorative trim to your liking, or just paint the exposed edge of the MDF board. You are done!

This method worked out EXTREMELY well for me. The edges are absolutely straight and clean. Of course, this all depends on how straight and clean your sub-board is. Here are some things that you might want to remember:

* - If you use contact cement, the plastic material could be "easily" removed if you wanted to take it back down. Wall damage would be minimal compared to gluing the plastic straight to the wall.
* - I attached a piece of felt material to the standoff on the RotoZip to prevent it from marking the front of the plastic. This is HIGHLY recommended.
* - Since you will have extra plastic material, put together a test piece to get a feel for how the adhesive works as well as practicing using your Router or RotoZip to trim off the excess.

I'll post pictures later. Cheers!

Steve

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post #568 of 1284 Old 10-22-2002, 07:24 AM
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Holy buttonclicks Batman! This thread has over 100,000 views now!

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post #569 of 1284 Old 10-25-2002, 09:47 PM - Thread Starter
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Oh! My Gosh .... When I found this plastic material at Lowe's and posted my find, I didn't imagine that it would reach this size. I have built two screens now, (Parkland gave me a 5 x 8 sheet) the latest being a 103 inch 16:9 for which I built about 8 months ago. The high def. picture from HD Net looks great.

I'm sure glad that I was able to share this find with all of you and the best of luck building your screen. Ron Geyer
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post #570 of 1284 Old 10-25-2002, 09:50 PM
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Hey Ron... How come you only have 31 posts?

Is it because you have spent the last year enjoying your HT, instead of logging in to the AVS forums? ;`]

Thanks for your post.

Pocatello
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