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Old 10-05-2010, 02:22 PM - Thread Starter
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A new David Gilmour experiment CD with "The Orb" for release with deluxe package in 360 surround

New David Gilmour CD
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Old 10-05-2010, 03:00 PM
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Unfortunately the 360 surround is for headphones only. Not sure why they didn't do a multichannel mix if they were going to the trouble of a headphone surround mix blah.

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Old 10-06-2010, 05:32 AM
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Originally Posted by mcallister View Post

Unfortunately the 360 surround is for headphones only. Not sure why they didn't do a multichannel mix if they were going to the trouble of a headphone surround mix blah.

I agree do a proper surround mix and stick it out on DVD/Blu ray/SACD
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Old 10-07-2010, 12:22 PM
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I will probably still buy the album as I love Gilmour and am a huge Floyd fan. From what I've heard of it it sounds pretty cool.

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Old 10-07-2010, 02:57 PM
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"headphone surround mix"? Do we now have headphones with front and rear speakers as well?


(Actually that sounds kinda cool.)
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Old 10-07-2010, 11:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Orbert View Post

"headphone surround mix"? Do we now have headphones with front and rear speakers as well?


(Actually that sounds kinda cool.)

I believe they were available in the Quadraphonic days (70s). They did have two speakers (front & rear) in each ear and were the huge over-the-ear phones that were popular in the day. I also remember them coming back in the 90s when 5.1 started to take off. I don't know if they're available today, but I'm sure either Amazon or eBay would have them, for a price.
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Old 10-08-2010, 10:35 AM
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It's seems like either they'd need a special 4-channel jack and plug (which is probably not the case), or some kind of matrix decoder built in. It sounds interesting either way, but I'm doubtful about how much separation effect you can get.
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Old 10-08-2010, 11:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orbert View Post

"headphone surround mix"? Do we now have headphones with front and rear speakers as well?


(Actually that sounds kinda cool.)

This new DG/Orb album "360 surround" is probably a variation of holophonics, which Floyd used on The Final Cut, IIRC. Basically attempts to encode the psychoacoustics into the signal to ffol your brain into perceiving front/rear separation.

IMHO the main way humans perceive front/back is by tiny variations in our head azimuth (rotate sideways), as that causes trends to be heard in the ear that help define the source direction. So these fixed-headphone solutions are not very effective. (Again, IMHO.)

But I'm not an expert in these fields,

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Old 10-08-2010, 12:40 PM - Thread Starter
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Yeah, I remember "The Final Cut" as being recorded in holophonics and I've always wondered if that transferred over to the CD. Remember Q-sound???

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Originally Posted by shinksma View Post

This new DG/Orb album "360 surround" is probably a variation of holophonics, which Floyd used on The Final Cut, IIRC. Basically attempts to encode the psychoacoustics into the signal to ffol your brain into perceiving front/rear separation.

IMHO the main way humans perceive front/back is by tiny variations in our head azimuth (rotate sideways), as that causes trends to be heard in the ear that help define the source direction. So these fixed-headphone solutions are not very effective. (Again, IMHO.)

But I'm not an expert in these fields,

shinksma

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Old 10-09-2010, 12:20 AM
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So this would be like binaural recordings for headphones since thats the only way to get
sound to seem to move around with 2 drivers.
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Old 10-19-2010, 05:55 PM
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Although this is no longer a real surround music discussion, just thought I'd chime in and mention that I'm listening to the CD now (in 2-ch non-headphone regular mix). A lot more Gilmour than I thought would present: his guitar really is the lead instrument, playing over the typical Orb ambient house stuff. Very nice. Not for fans who can't stray from the Floyd Canon very far however - this will never be confused with a Floyd or "normal" Gilmour solo recording.

And the odd Gilmour vocal, super-processed and mixed relatively low, is quite well executed, IMHO.

Hmm, for those not familiar with The Orb, imagine Gilmour guesting on a recent Tangerine Dream album (one of the ones from the late-90s to today with lots of Jerome Froese's techno drum stuff). That assumes you are familiar with recent Tadream, which most aren't - lost a lot of fans in the 1990s...

IMHO,

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Old 10-26-2010, 06:42 AM
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Originally Posted by shinksma View Post

Not for fans who can't stray from the Floyd Canon very far however - this will never be confused with a Floyd or "normal" Gilmour solo recording.

I never confuse Gilmour's music with Pink Floyd period. Roger Waters was Pink Floyd. David Gilmour just happened to be one of the guitarists Roger used for awhile.

On the back of the "The Final Cut" it says - "a requiem for the post war dream by roger waters - performed by pink floyd". That pretty much sums it up.
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Old 10-26-2010, 07:12 PM
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Originally Posted by ricky_rocket View Post

I never confuse Gilmour's music with Pink Floyd period. Roger Waters was Pink Floyd. David Gilmour just happened to be one of the guitarists Roger used for awhile.

This is a little off-topic, but I have to take issue with "David Gilmour just happened to be one of the guitarists Roger used for a while." That's ridiculous, as any Pink Floyd fan knows. Gilmour's virtuoso and beautifully melodic and killer-toned guitar playing was an integral part of Floyd's sound after Syd lost it and got left out of the band. Gilmour's solos in such staples as "Time," "Money," "Shine On You Crazy Diamond," and "Comfortably Numb," as well as his acoustic riffs and chords in "Wish You Were Here," probably Floyd's best known hits, are legendary and what make those songs so memorable. Never mind that David sang lead in them (Roger and David both sing lead parts in "Comfortably Numb") and in more songs than Roger ever did until Animals, The Wall, and The Final Cut.

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On the back of the "The Final Cut" it says - "a requiem for the post war dream by roger waters - performed by pink floyd". That pretty much sums it up.

There's no question that The Final Cut is Roger's work. The same is true of The Wall, with notable exceptions which David wrote and sang and for which he produced killer guitar solos. His two solos from "Comfortably Numb" are widely regarded as some of the best guitar solos of all time by many rock music critics and guitarists everywhere.

There's also little doubt that post-Roger Floyd sounded different from Floyd with Roger. A Momentary Lapse of Reason and The Division Bell are great albums, and they contain some fantastic songs, but the sound of them, while unmistakeably Floyd, is a different Floyd, just as the post-Syd Barrett Floyd is a very different Floyd from the Floyd founded by Syd.

In short, Roger Waters was not Pink Floyd. He was an integral part of it and its sound, and unquestionably the band leader after Syd was left behind (Syd Barrett was the band leader at the beginning) until Roger himself left. David Gilmour then became the band leader, and legally and musically, he, Nick Mason, and Richard Wright continued to be Pink Floyd for more than a decade until the band dissolved once and for all sometime after their 1994 World Tour (except for brief appearances at a few notable musical festivals in the UK).
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Old 10-26-2010, 10:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Will2007 View Post

This is a little off-topic, but I have to take issue with "David Gilmour just happened to be one of the guitarists Roger used for a while." That's ridiculous, as any Pink Floyd fan knows. Gilmour's virtuoso and beautifully melodic and killer-toned guitar playing was an integral part of Floyd's sound after Syd lost it and got left out of the band. Gilmour's solos in such staples as "Time," "Money," "Shine On You Crazy Diamond," and "Comfortably Numb," as well as his acoustic riffs and chords in "Wish You Were Here," probably Floyd's best known hits, are legendary and what make those songs so memorable. Never mind that David sang lead in them (Roger and David both sing lead parts in "Comfortably Numb") and in more songs than Roger ever did until Animals, The Wall, and The Final Cut.



There's no question that The Final Cut is Roger's work. The same is true of The Wall, with notable exceptions which David wrote and sang and for which he produced killer guitar solos. His two solos from "Comfortably Numb" are widely regarded as some of the best guitar solos of all time by many rock music critics and guitarists everywhere.

There's also little doubt that post-Roger Floyd sounded different from Floyd with Roger. A Momentary Lapse of Reason and The Division Bell are great albums, and they contain some fantastic songs, but the sound of them, while unmistakeably Floyd, is a different Floyd, just as the post-Syd Barrett Floyd is a very different Floyd from the Floyd founded by Syd.

In short, Roger Waters was not Pink Floyd. He was an integral part of it and its sound, and unquestionably the band leader after Syd was left behind (Syd Barrett was the band leader at the beginning) until Roger himself left. David Gilmour then became the band leader, and legally and musically, he, Nick Mason, and Richard Wright continued to be Pink Floyd for more than a decade until the band dissolved once and for all sometime after their 1994 World Tour (except for brief appearances at a few notable musical festivals in the UK).

+1 Very good post and I concur. I think you can (and they did) take Waters out and you still have PF.... Take out Gilmour and it is no where near the same band IMHO. Waters may have been the mouthpiece of the band, but Gilmour is the heart and soul. I wish that I could have been fortunate enough to see them in person. What is peculiar to me is that if you watch the DVD of Pompeii, you can start to see the friction between Waters and Gilmour. The band started out in the 60's and we still talk about them passionately in 2010. 40+ years and we still can't get enough.

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Old 10-27-2010, 04:11 AM
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+1 Very good post and I concur. I think you can (and they did) take Waters out and you still have PF.... Take out Gilmour and it is no where near the same band IMHO. Waters may have been the mouthpiece of the band, but Gilmour is the heart and soul. I wish that I could have been fortunate enough to see them in person. What is peculiar to me is that if you watch the DVD of Pompeii, you can start to see the friction between Waters and Gilmour. The band started out in the 60's and we still talk about them passionately in 2010. 40+ years and we still can't get enough.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Will2007 View Post

This is a little off-topic, but I have to take issue with "David Gilmour just happened to be one of the guitarists Roger used for a while." That's ridiculous, as any Pink Floyd fan knows. Gilmour's virtuoso and beautifully melodic and killer-toned guitar playing was an integral part of Floyd's sound after Syd lost it and got left out of the band. Gilmour's solos in such staples as "Time," "Money," "Shine On You Crazy Diamond," and "Comfortably Numb," as well as his acoustic riffs and chords in "Wish You Were Here," probably Floyd's best known hits, are legendary and what make those songs so memorable. Never mind that David sang lead in them (Roger and David both sing lead parts in "Comfortably Numb") and in more songs than Roger ever did until Animals, The Wall, and The Final Cut.



There's no question that The Final Cut is Roger's work. The same is true of The Wall, with notable exceptions which David wrote and sang and for which he produced killer guitar solos. His two solos from "Comfortably Numb" are widely regarded as some of the best guitar solos of all time by many rock music critics and guitarists everywhere.

There's also little doubt that post-Roger Floyd sounded different from Floyd with Roger. A Momentary Lapse of Reason and The Division Bell are great albums, and they contain some fantastic songs, but the sound of them, while unmistakeably Floyd, is a different Floyd, just as the post-Syd Barrett Floyd is a very different Floyd from the Floyd founded by Syd.

In short, Roger Waters was not Pink Floyd. He was an integral part of it and its sound, and unquestionably the band leader after Syd was left behind (Syd Barrett was the band leader at the beginning) until Roger himself left. David Gilmour then became the band leader, and legally and musically, he, Nick Mason, and Richard Wright continued to be Pink Floyd for more than a decade until the band dissolved once and for all sometime after their 1994 World Tour (except for brief appearances at a few notable musical festivals in the UK).


+2, Love Gilmour his tone, melody, and voice are second to none in my opinion.

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Old 10-27-2010, 07:27 AM
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+2, Love Gilmour his tone, melody, and voice are second to none in my opinion.

Don't get me wrong guys. Glimour is an excellent guitarist and a good singer. I'm not trying to put him down. All I'm saying is that Roger Waters was more of Pink Floyd than Gilmour. The main song writer always deserves extra credit.


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There's also little doubt that post-Roger Floyd sounded different from Floyd with Roger. A Momentary Lapse of Reason

In the Rolling Stone article (Roger Waters cover) - Roger says to settle law suits he gave up the Pink Floyd name to the other band members and in return he owns all of "The Wall" content.
So IMO it is a Pink Floyd album in name only. It's a very good album - I admit. But I really think Gilmour should have renamed his post Waters band something else - maybe DGE - The David Gilmour Experience.


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Waters may have been the mouthpiece of the band, but Gilmour is the heart and soul.

Maybe. And like many other rock combos Lennon/McCartney, Jagger/Richards, Townsend/Daltry - there was a certain chemistry with Waters/Gilmour that produced the best music of their careers. However, even when John left the Beatles, Paul didn't carry on with The Beatles name. He had the integrity to move on and call his new band Wings.
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Old 10-27-2010, 11:02 PM
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Originally Posted by ricky_rocket View Post

Glimour is an excellent guitarist and a good singer.

Calling David Gilmour an excellent guitarist is like calling Michael Jordan an excellent basketball player.

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In the Rolling Stone article (Roger Waters cover) - Roger says to settle law suits he gave up the Pink Floyd name to the other band members and in return he owns all of "The Wall" content.

Roger is putting himself in the best light and being less than forthright. There were lawsuits among the members of the band after Roger left, and in particular the right to the name "Pink Floyd" was the main topic.

Roger settled because he was sure to lose his fight over the right to use the name. He was hardly a gentleman about it. He said a lot of nasty things about his former close friends and band mates.

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But I really think Gilmour should have renamed his post Waters band something else - maybe DGE - The David Gilmour Experience.

Are you familiar with the history of Pink Floyd? Roger Waters, Nick Mason, and Richard Wright were in a band together, later joined by guitarist Bob Klose. Syd Barrett eventually joined them, replacing Bob Klose on guitar after he left, and Syd gave the band its new name, "The Pink Floyd Sound," which eventually got shortened to Pink Floyd.

Since Mason and Wright were there from the beginning (although Wright was ousted around the time The Final Cut was released), and Gilmour was with them beginning in late 1967, the three of them constituted 3/4 of Pink Floyd throughout the band's rise to fame and super stardom. Roger was the fourth member, of course, but it wasn't his band; it belonged to all of them.

When Roger left, that still left 3/4 of them in the band. Why should Roger have been able to stop them from using the name? Since he left, the band should have been able to, and did, continue without him, as Pink Floyd.

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Maybe. And like many other rock combos Lennon/McCartney, Jagger/Richards, Townsend/Daltry - there was a certain chemistry with Waters/Gilmour that produced the best music of their careers. However, even when John left the Beatles, Paul didn't carry on with The Beatles name. He had the integrity to move on and call his new band Wings.

That's not a fitting comparison. Paul left The Beatles first. He was 1/4 of the band. He didn't continue as The Beatles, nor could he have. He formed his own band and called it Paul McCartney and Wings, later just Wings.
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Old 10-27-2010, 11:07 PM
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+1 Very good post and I concur. I think you can (and they did) take Waters out and you still have PF.... Take out Gilmour and it is no where near the same band IMHO. Waters may have been the mouthpiece of the band, but Gilmour is the heart and soul. I wish that I could have been fortunate enough to see them in person. What is peculiar to me is that if you watch the DVD of Pompeii, you can start to see the friction between Waters and Gilmour. The band started out in the 60's and we still talk about them passionately in 2010. 40+ years and we still can't get enough.

I did get to see them at the beginning of their 1994 tour. They packed Legion Field in Birmingham, with about 100,000 in attendance. It was an awesome show, easily the best concert of my long concert going career.
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Old 10-28-2010, 12:14 AM
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Pink~ish Floyd

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