Antimode 8033S-II Subwoofer Correction to 250HZ? - AVS Forum
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Old 11-29-2012, 02:20 PM - Thread Starter
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When the Dspeaker 8033 was first introduced years ago, there was a gentleman from Finland posting on AVS about how the corrections above 120Hz were not effective; the directionality of the sound would create nodes that changed significantly with just a few inches of microphone movement. Of course it is understood the most significant room effects are at lower frequencies, so it was not a big problem to not have correction above 120Hz.

Now enter the 8033-II with correction up to 250Hz.
Has anything else changed in the product to allow effective corrections above 120Hz?
My biggest confusion is over the question of getting corrections up to 250Hz to a sub getting it's signal after the 8033's 80Hz low pass filter. My assumption is with a 80Hz crossover, corrections between 120-250Hz would have to be sent to the main speakers instead of the sub, but the 8033S-II does not do this.
Am I to believe that corrections up to 250Hz are sent to the sub after the low pass filter, and these outputs from the sub cancel the unwanted nodes and ringing from the output of the main speakers?
Or,
are the problems created from the mains ignored, and the 8033S-II between 120-250Hz corrects only the higher frequency harmonics of the 80Hz and below output coming from the sub?

For someone who has used the 8033-II, have you seen (or heard) any evidence of usefulness between 120-250Hz when used with a sub which is crossed at around 80 Hz?

Yes, I'm confused.gif
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Old 11-29-2012, 05:50 PM
 
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The 8033S II has fifty percent more filters; 36 vs 24. That would help EQ up to 250Hz.

http://www.dspeaker.com/en/products/anti-mode-8033.shtml

Scroll down on the page and you'll see a comparison data sheet.

My understanding of how to set things up is, run Anti-Mode first and then run Audyssey and then via the AVR, add your own spin by custom setting the features, crossovers and gain of the speakers using a sound meter.

Do you use two or more subs?

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Old 11-30-2012, 11:03 AM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for the response Beeman. Good point about the ability of many more filters available on the new unit.

My 2.1 system is rather unusual, that's why I left out the details. I do not use Audyssey or an AVR and use only one sub with a fourth order active crossover set to 90Hz with smaller "satellite" speakers. Since I'll be moving to a new home in a year or two, I'd rather wait until then to add a second sub, when I know the room size/shape.

In general, I was looking for a better understanding of how the Antimode 8033S-II signal to the sub cleans up room response that is well above the crossover point.
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Old 11-30-2012, 05:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by homecinemaquest View Post

In general, I was looking for a better understanding of how the Antimode 8033S-II signal to the sub cleans up room response that is well above the crossover point.

For what ever the reason, your above reminds me of this song: "Mambo No. 5"

The Anti-Mode, depending on version, analyzes and corrects for 16-250Hz. The Anti-Mode is specifically designed to tame the LFE channel and lower bass octaves below 160Hz or 250Hz. Before calibration, one turns off any subwoofer based filters and then after calibration, turns them back on. AVR based filters do not affect the calibration process as they're before the Anti-Mode process and are not a consideration.

The Anti-Mode takes care of "Modes" or peaks by reducing the peaks but does nothing for valleys or nulls. The addition of a second sub helps fill in the nulls and by reducing the peak, brings the frequency curve closer to the node, creating a flat graph in the process.

(I think I have all the above right.)
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Old 12-02-2012, 01:41 PM
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Damn, I like the Mambo No. 5 song Beeman. A little Jessica in my life , a little bit of......now the song is
stuck in my head biggrin.gif

Vardo
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Old 12-02-2012, 11:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vardo View Post

Damn, I like the Mambo No. 5 song Beeman. A little Jessica in my life , a little bit of......now the song is
stuck in my head biggrin.gif

....................biggrin.gif

Reminds me of what we go through in our quest for quality bass to compliment our movie viewing pleasure as it's all good.

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Old 12-02-2012, 11:14 PM
 
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dbl post
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