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post #1 of 17 Old 01-07-2013, 03:46 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Is there anything that I can buy or diy to minimize vibrations ?


my sub is a power sound audio sx30





I will appreciate any help
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post #2 of 17 Old 01-07-2013, 04:21 PM
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http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002D0B4U/ref=oh_details_o01_s00_i00

or

http://www.amazon.com/Auralex-Subwoofer-Isolation-15x15x3-inch-Charcoal/dp/B001140OZ0/ref=pd_bxgy_MI_text_y

depending on the size of your subwoofer
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post #3 of 17 Old 01-07-2013, 04:51 PM - Thread Starter
 
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thanks




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post #4 of 17 Old 01-07-2013, 07:24 PM
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Originally Posted by losservatore View Post

Is there anything that I can buy or diy to minimize vibrations ?
Vibrations of what? Objects in the room? The floor, walls, doors, windows and other large surfaces can resonate in concert with the audio output of the sub. There's nothing you can do to stop that, short of reconstructing the room. But smaller objects vibrating from being in contact with those large surfaces can be isolated with felt pads and the like.

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post #5 of 17 Old 01-07-2013, 07:41 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Is there anything that I can buy or diy to minimize vibrations ?
Vibrations of what? Objects in the room? The floor, walls, doors, windows and other large surfaces can resonate in concert with the audio output of the sub. There's nothing you can do to stop that, short of reconstructing the room. But smaller objects vibrating from being in contact with those large surfaces can be isolated with felt pads and the like.


I want to minimize floor vibration


I want to minimize vibration not to eliminate then; I know that is imposible to completely eliminate vibrations I just want to get a good amount of output with minimal vibrations.
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post #6 of 17 Old 01-07-2013, 07:49 PM
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I want to minimize floor vibration
You can't. The floor vibrates in resonance with the long wavelength low frequency sound waves produced by the sub. There are products that claim to reduce floor vibrations, but they don't work. They claim to do so by isolating the sub from the floor, but floor vibrations aren't caused by the sub being in contact with it, so isolating it doesn't do a thing.

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post #7 of 17 Old 01-07-2013, 08:20 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I want to minimize floor vibration
You can't. The floor vibrates in resonance with the long wavelength low frequency sound waves produced by the sub. There are products that claim to reduce floor vibrations, but they don't work. They claim to do so by isolating the sub from the floor, but floor vibrations aren't caused by the sub being in contact with it, so isolating it doesn't do a thing.


so it doesn't help at all?not even a certain output.
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post #8 of 17 Old 01-07-2013, 08:54 PM
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I researched and purchased a Great Gramma for my SVS Ultra and found that room vibrations lessened and the bass seemed to tighten up.
$100 well spent IMO.

If it didn't do what it was intended to do, I would have said so. Unlike Bill, I have actually tried the product.
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post #9 of 17 Old 01-07-2013, 10:37 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by Yosh70 View Post

I researched and purchased a Great Gramma for my SVS Ultra and found that room vibrations lessened and the bass seemed to tighten up.
$100 well spent IMO.

If it didn't do what it was intended to do, I would have said so. Unlike Bill, I have actually tried the product.


Thanks I would like to try it...
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post #10 of 17 Old 01-08-2013, 05:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Yosh70 View Post

I researched and purchased a Great Gramma for my SVS Ultra and found that room vibrations lessened and the bass seemed to tighten up.
$100 well spent IMO.
If it didn't do what it was intended to do, I would have said so. Unlike Bill, I have actually tried the product.
Show me your measured results. Unlike you, I've taken them. wink.gif

Next to high priced cables and power conditioners isolation pads and spikes are the biggest scams in audio. The following quoted claims are taken straight from the websites of manufacturers of these devices:

The Isolation Claim: ‘Its purpose is to prevent sound from transmitting through your subwoofer to surrounding surfaces. Subwoofers create big vibrations (low frequencies) that you can feel in the floor and in objects placed nearby. When the source of the vibrations is coupled directly to the floor it causes these objects to vibrate or resonate…’

The Truth: The source of these vibrations is the movement of the driver cone. The claim would only be true if you coupled the driver cone to the floor. If the cabinet panels vibrate enough to cause the floor to vibrate the speaker is defective.

The Decoupling Claim: ‘Isolators for your speakers…will decouple your speakers from the surface they rest upon, resulting in a more pure, accurate tone. Low frequencies will be projected and will no longer lack the definition you desire. Mid and high frequencies will be crisp and intelligible. Rattles and resonances will be a thing of the past.’

The Spike Claim: ‘By rigidly coupling a loudspeaker enclosure to a floor by means of a spiking system, it is possible to dramatically improve clarity, stereo imaging and bass response. This is very apparent with subwoofer systems.’

The Quandary: These sources claim the same benefits from coupling and from decoupling. Who’s telling the truth?

The Truth: Both are lying. Isolation and coupling makes no difference. To test this I measured the response of my THT and my David with the test mic in the room, in the next room, and in the room below, with the cabinet sitting on the carpeted floor, on four inches of high density acoustic foam, on rubber feet and on spikes. I’d post the measured results for each set of comparisons, but there would be no point. In each case the measured responses of the four options were identical.
Note that this was on a carpeted floor. There may be some slight benefits to isolation devices or rubber feet on a bare floor, or on a bare shelf or stand. But you never want a bare floor, it’s an acoustical nightmare. If you only have area rugs in your listening room stick a piece of felt carpet padding, a carpet scrap or rubber feet under your speaker. If you're using bookshelves on a bare shelf or stand small rubber feet or felt pads are all you need to prevent spurious vibrations.

The Endorser Claim: ‘I tried them and they work, I know what I’m hearing!’

The Truth: The first thing you learn in an acoustical engineering course is that you don’t know what you’re hearing. If you did you’d be able to listen to a speaker, take pencil and graph paper in hand, and draw a frequency response chart, THD chart and waterfall plot, all with 1/24 octave resolution and 1/10dB accuracy. Our ears just aren’t that good, not by a very wide margin. But our imagination works very well, and that clouds our audio judgment, leading to placebo effect. In short, if you think something will make a difference in the sound, it will.

For an in depth examination of why we really don’t know what we’re hearing check out this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYTlN6wjcvQ
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post #11 of 17 Old 01-08-2013, 08:15 AM
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Originally Posted by losservatore View Post

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Is there anything that I can buy or diy to minimize vibrations ?
Vibrations of what? Objects in the room? The floor, walls, doors, windows and other large surfaces can resonate in concert with the audio output of the sub. There's nothing you can do to stop that, short of reconstructing the room. But smaller objects vibrating from being in contact with those large surfaces can be isolated with felt pads and the like.

I want to minimize floor vibration

I want to minimize vibration not to eliminate then; I know that is imposible to completely eliminate vibrations I just want to get a good amount of output with minimal vibrations.

A lot of the debate here can be killed with a simple observation. Assuming you meant your sub is the XS30, then there is zero benefit to adding mechanical isolation, as the dual opposed woofers have no rocking force to be transmitted to the floor. The only thing energizing the floor is acoustic energy which doesn't change even if the sub is suspended from the ceiling but in the same location. You are better off putting effort into strategic use of weatherstripping and felt pads to keep items from rattling in the room. wink.gif
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post #12 of 17 Old 01-08-2013, 08:21 AM
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Doesn't the sub box itself vibrate? Wouldn't isolating it from the floor reduce at least some vibration?

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post #13 of 17 Old 01-08-2013, 08:37 AM
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Doesn't the sub box itself vibrate?
Only if it's defective. Not that a sub box is totally inert, but when properly constructed the resonant frequency of the box panels will be way up in the midrange, at least 500Hz, usually higher. That way whatever sound the panels make if they vibrate is well above the sub passband, and at a level way below where you'd hear them as audible harmonic distortion. If you put your hand on your sub at the most you should only feel a very slight vibration, and that's not going to cause the floor to vibrate. The sound waves created by the cone moving back and forth up to an inch will. If the sub is on a bare wooden floor the floor vibrations can be transferred back to the sub, and that can cause the sub to vibrate atop the floor. But those vibrations will also be in the midrange, and all it takes to prevent them is rubber feet, carpet, carpet pad or a thin piece of dense foam.

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post #14 of 17 Old 01-08-2013, 08:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Kamikaze13 View Post

Doesn't the sub box itself vibrate?
Only if it's defective. Not that a sub box is totally inert, but when properly constructed the resonant frequency of the box panels will be way up in the midrange, at least 500Hz, usually higher. That way whatever sound the panels make if they vibrate is well above the sub passband, and at a level way below where you'd hear them as audible harmonic distortion. If you put your hand on your sub at the most you should only feel a very slight vibration, and that's not going to cause the floor to vibrate. The sound waves created by the cone moving back and forth up to an inch will. If the sub is on a bare wooden floor the floor vibrations can be transferred back to the sub, and that can cause the sub to vibrate atop the floor. But those vibrations will also be in the midrange, and all it takes to prevent them is rubber feet, carpet, carpet pad or a thin piece of dense foam.

Unfortunately that's a bit optimistic in expectations. Subwoofer cabinets do vibrate and flex. Much of what most feel in vibrations from a front firing subwoofer will be from fore-aft reaction forces from the woofer dancing back and forth. There are plenty of subwoofers where there is panel flexing, especially the lowest cost examples, sometimes in more expensive examples. More importantly, the likelihood of panel vibrations being transferred to the floor is pretty miniscule when the sub is sitting on 4 feet at the corners of the box. The fore-aft rocking can most certainly be coupled. I've seen well braced, 150+ lb front firing subwoofers audibly vibrate against the floor with big powerful woofers when feet, spikes or some isolation pad isn't being used.

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post #15 of 17 Old 01-08-2013, 09:08 AM
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I've seen well braced, 150+ lb front firing subwoofers audibly vibrate against the floor with big powerful woofers when feet, spikes or some isolation pad isn't being used.
I've seen that too, of course, but as you note all it takes is rubber feet or a half inch of high density foam to fix that issue, not a hundred dollar gizmo. And if there's enough acoustical energy being generated to make a 150 pound cab dance there's enough to make all but the most robust floors to vibrate, along with everything else not only in the room but probably in the house.

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post #16 of 17 Old 01-08-2013, 02:49 PM
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there's enough to make all but the most robust floors to vibrate, along with everything else not only in the room but probably in the house.

Or as we call it around these parts, 'movie night'.

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post #17 of 17 Old 01-09-2013, 11:52 PM
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The gain contro will definetly work to control vbrations, wink.gif

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