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post #1 of 31 Old 01-09-2013, 07:30 AM - Thread Starter
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I currently own the HSU VTF3 MK4 and am thinking of getting a second sub.
Can I get a second sub that is not as good as the HSU because of budget or does the second sub have to be the same make/model? Also it is bad enough the wife thinks one sub is too much for her ears with low frequencies so I am not sure If adding a second sub would smooth out the bass or sound the same as having one.
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post #2 of 31 Old 01-09-2013, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by asere View Post

Can I get a second sub that is not as good as the HSU
Maybe, but it will become the weak link in the chain, and there's no way to predict if that will be a problem or not.
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Also it is bad enough the wife thinks one sub is too much for her ears with low frequencies
Earplugs or a ManCave will fix that.
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so I am not sure If adding a second sub would smooth out the bass or sound the same as having one.
Unless you have a huge space or want to be silly loud the usual reason for adding a second sub is to smooth room modes, not to go louder. But to get placement right you really need to measure response at the listening position, otherwise it's a hit or miss proposition.

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post #3 of 31 Old 01-09-2013, 08:26 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post

Maybe, but it will become the weak link in the chain, and there's no way to predict if that will be a problem or not. Earplugs or a ManCave will fix that.Unless you have a huge space or want to be silly loud the usual reason for adding a second sub is to smooth room modes, not to go louder. But to get placement right you really need to measure response at the listening position, otherwise it's a hit or miss proposition.

My room is around 4500 cf. The one sub pressurizes the room now. I do not want to get louder just maybe smoother bass. I did the crawl and it is at the flattest response spl meter gave me. I just don't know if a second sub will smooth the bass more.
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post #4 of 31 Old 01-09-2013, 08:30 AM
 
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Originally Posted by asere View Post

Also it is bad enough the wife thinks one sub is too much for her ears with low frequencies so I am not sure If adding a second sub would smooth out the bass or sound the same as having one.

This is the truth, tell her the addition of a second sub will improve the overall bass sound quality by smoothing out the bass nulls (sound voids) in the room and that by dialing in the sonic compliment of the subs, the overall sound quality becomes pure and more easily understood. None of which is BS.

In our case, the wife is very sound level sensitive so I find that if we start out with the volume turned down a bit, over the course of the beginning of the movie, as my wife acclimates to starting sound levels (how relaxed does she look), I slowly creep the volume up and being that it's not such an all at once shock on her auditory system, she tolerates higher levels much better..
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post #5 of 31 Old 01-09-2013, 08:34 AM
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Wife hates bass.........Buy more subs. Are we releated? I just bought new speakers and blamed it on my wife. She complains it gets too loud at the action scenes so I bought new speakers and said I didn't want to but you are always complaining about the volume and this will help.
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post #6 of 31 Old 01-09-2013, 08:36 AM
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I have two VTF3-MK4's and love it. Tell her a second sub is better then a second wife!

Just kidding. It will smooth out the bass significantly.

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post #7 of 31 Old 01-09-2013, 08:39 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by SightSeeker1 View Post

Wife hates bass.........Buy more subs. Are we releated? I just bought new speakers and blamed it on my wife. She complains it gets too loud at the action scenes so I bought new speakers and said I didn't want to but you are always complaining about the volume and this will help.

LOL! Thats funny!!
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post #8 of 31 Old 01-09-2013, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by asere View Post

My room is around 4500 cf. The one sub pressurizes the room now. I do not want to get louder just maybe smoother bass. I did the crawl and it is at the flattest response spl meter gave me. I just don't know if a second sub will smooth the bass more.
The crawl is OK for a quick down and dirty placement with one sub. With two you need to measure the response at the LP with the first sub, charting out where the peaks and valleys are, then via trial and error place the second where it does the best job of leveling those peaks and valleys out. Measuring software is the best way to do that, charting out response one frequency at a time by hand takes forever.

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post #9 of 31 Old 01-09-2013, 08:41 AM
 
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Originally Posted by SightSeeker1 View Post

Wife hates bass.........Buy more subs. Are we releated? I just bought new speakers and blamed it on my wife. She complains it gets too loud at the action scenes so I bought new speakers and said I didn't want to but you are always complaining about the volume and this will help.

This worked for me. Explain to your wife that you respect the sensitivity of her hearing but if one goes to a movie theater, they don't tell the projectionist to turn the volume down. Explain that movie sound tracks are intentionally mixed for "dynamics" which consist of whispering in risky situations and big boffo explosions with everything in between so yes, action scenes are loud and are intended to be loud. Explain, that's a movie sound track and the dynamics of the sound track is how the sound track is intended to be experienced.

If you do this, maybe she'll relax as then she'll understand, it's suppose to be this way.

I found a way to deal with sensitive nature of a woman's hearing is to start out with the volume down low and slowly, during the first part of the movie, creep the volume up. Doing it this way desensitizes a person to the volume increase as their hearing is given a chance to acclimate to the lower THX levels. I start out at -17 and work my way up to -10. Works for us. Maybe if you do this, it will work for you.

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post #10 of 31 Old 01-11-2013, 10:42 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by BeeMan458 View Post

This worked for me. Explain to your wife that you respect the sensitivity of her hearing but if one goes to a movie theater, they don't tell the projectionist to turn the volume down. Explain that movie sound tracks are intentionally mixed for "dynamics" which consist of whispering in risky situations and big boffo explosions with everything in between so yes, action scenes are loud and are intended to be loud. Explain, that's a movie sound track and the dynamics of the sound track is how the sound track is intended to be experienced.

If you do this, maybe she'll relax as then she'll understand, it's suppose to be this way.

I found a way to deal with sensitive nature of a woman's hearing is to start out with the volume down low and slowly, during the first part of the movie, creep the volume up. Doing it this way desensitizes a person to the volume increase as their hearing is given a chance to acclimate to the lower THX levels. I start out at -17 and work my way up to -10. Works for us. Maybe if you do this, it will work for you.

-

Start at -17 and work way up to -10 not in my home as much as I would like to. Kids are asleep when we watch a movie so its more like -40:D for us.

Also earlier I asked if its ok to have a good sub like my Hsu and add a budget sub and the reply was the second sub will be the weak link if its a budget sub. How about if I add a second sub but this time say a sealed or ported SVS. Will that be ok or is it always better to get the same brand/model as current sub?
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post #11 of 31 Old 01-11-2013, 10:51 AM
 
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Originally Posted by asere View Post

Start at -17 and work way up to -10 not in my home as much as I would like to. Kids are asleep when we watch a movie so its more like -40:D for us.

Also earlier I asked if its ok to have a good sub like my Hsu and add a budget sub and the reply was the second sub will be the weak link if its a budget sub. How about if I add a second sub but this time say a sealed or ported SVS. Will that be ok or is it always better to get the same brand/model as current sub?

Sorry to read you can't crank the subs as that's the purpose of having them. tongue.gif

My understanding and as you noted, the problem of mismatched subs is, when the weaker sub tries to keep up with the stronger sub, the weaker sub bottoms out so, in the end, the individual characteristics of each sub becomes the limiting factor. To eliminate the sonic confusion different subs bring to the party, my opinion, it's simply easier to add a second matching sub or to lose the mismatched pair and start over with a matching pair.
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post #12 of 31 Old 01-11-2013, 12:03 PM
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besides absolute output limits of whatever sub is "lesser" you have frequency response issues. If one sub rolls off at 30 Hz and the other at 20 Hz, then you get , by definition, either "boosted" bass from 30 Hz up where both are outputting "flattish" or reduced bass below 30 Hz, when the additions of the sub with a higher cutoff go away. HOw all that works together in a given room and with (if available) given EQ products, is unpredictable.
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post #13 of 31 Old 01-11-2013, 01:11 PM - Thread Starter
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I might just get the avr 4311 and add a second Hsu sub same as my current one so that way it will be even plus the 4311 has Sub EQ HT.
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post #14 of 31 Old 01-12-2013, 03:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asere View Post

I might just get the avr 4311 and add a second Hsu sub same as my current one so that way it will be even plus the 4311 has Sub EQ HT.

The 4311 is a good choice with dual subs.
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post #15 of 31 Old 01-12-2013, 03:53 AM
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besides absolute output limits of whatever sub is "lesser" you have frequency response issues. If one sub rolls off at 30 Hz and the other at 20 Hz, then you get , by definition, either "boosted" bass from 30 Hz up where both are outputting "flattish" or reduced bass below 30 Hz, when the additions of the sub with a higher cutoff go away. HOw all that works together in a given room and with (if available) given EQ products, is unpredictable.

That's why you need good room correction software. I agree that it's probably better to have identical subs, but the situation you describe with two subs with different rolloff points really isn't any different than having mains that roll off at a different point than a sub.
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That's why you need good room correction software. I agree that it's probably better to have identical subs, but the situation you describe with two subs with different rolloff points really isn't any different than having mains that roll off at a different point than a sub.

And agreeing with you when I post, hence the benefit of bass management, where one has quality mains coupled to low pass filtering of <80Hz to the subs. By bass managing the <80Hz output to sub duty, room correction software only has to deal with matched sub output. No guarantees of this fixing all the acoustic problems in a room but working with matched subwoofer output makes room correction efforts that much easier due to fewer variables.

The point, mismatched subs go a long way in complicating one's acoustic life. Hence the rational as to why mixing unmatched or unequal subwoofers is not a good idea.

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post #17 of 31 Old 01-12-2013, 09:13 AM
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Originally Posted by asere View Post

Start at -17 and work way up to -10 not in my home as much as I would like to. Kids are asleep when we watch a movie so its more like -40:D for us.
At -40, headroom issues will not be a problem with virtually *any* subwoofer.
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Originally Posted by asere View Post

Also earlier I asked if its ok to have a good sub like my Hsu and add a budget sub and the reply was the second sub will be the weak link if its a budget sub. How about if I add a second sub but this time say a sealed or ported SVS. Will that be ok or is it always better to get the same brand/model as current sub?
See above.

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post #18 of 31 Old 01-12-2013, 09:27 AM
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... but the situation you describe with two subs with different rolloff points really isn't any different than having mains that roll off at a different point than a sub.
Assuming you mean mains that roll off higher than the sub(s), this is what Bass Management is for. If the mains can't reproduce the content because they roll off above the frequencies contained in the content, set crossovers on the mains and re-direct that LF content to the subwoofers, which have a much better chance at reproducing it. Too many people think that, because they have physically "large" speakers, they should be set to "Large". It's not about the size of the cabinets. It's about the LF extension and roll-off of the speakers. For example, if the speakers start to roll off at 40 Hz, the content below 40 Hz should be sent to the subs.

The other consideration is compression at higher volumes. The speakers may roll off at 40 Hz at 85 dB. But when they're sent that same content at 105 dB, they will compress and distort. The usual recommendation is setting the crossovers an octave above the specified -3 dB point of the speakers to eliminate this concern. For 40 Hz speakers, that would be 80 Hz crossovers, (generally speaking.)

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Using identical sub is the easiest option for setting up dual subs. othewise, match the two non-identical subs as close as possibe in performance characteristic. Many people run non-identical subs with good results.

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post #20 of 31 Old 01-17-2013, 08:27 AM - Thread Starter
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Please excuse my ignorance but in a film what is the difference between Dynamics and the Low Frequency Extension?
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post #21 of 31 Old 01-17-2013, 09:24 AM
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Please excuse my ign

orance but in a film what is the difference between Dynamics and the Low Frequency Extension?

In sound (not just movies) dynamics is about loudness - - if a recording has a large difference between quietest and loudest (or more typically from average to loudest) it's said to have lots of dynamics.

Frequency extension, in sound, is how deep and how high a speaker (or other device) reproduces. On a piano, the A above middle C is 440 hz, and is actually a fairly high tone (they typical tuning fork emits 440 Hz). The lowest string on a normal guitar has an 80 Hz(ish) "first harmonic" - -ie the main tone. The lowest string on a normal bass is 40 Hz (leaving out higher harmonics). The typically cited typical range for sound reproduction is 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz. But there clearly are young people who can hear above 20,000 Hz, and folks have been tested to hear below 20 Hz if it's loud enough.\

Usually in the HT context, extension is about how deep your bass goes. My main speakers are already a little less loud than they should be if they were flat at 40 Hz. My sub plays close enough to flat to somewhere between 25 and 30 Hz in my room. My overall bass extension is, let's say, 27 Hz, although I can still hear the sub at lower frequencies sometimes, it's just about half as loud as it "should" be if i was flat to 20 Hz. Although if its very loud below 30 Hz, there's plenty of distortion mixed in, courtesy of my less than superb sub.
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post #22 of 31 Old 02-07-2013, 07:00 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Adam1971 View Post

I have two VTF3-MK4's and love it. Tell her a second sub is better then a second wife!

Just kidding. It will smooth out the bass significantly.

I have one VTF3 MK4 and I won a Ken Kreisel sub 12012. The Kreisel will arrive soon but know I guess that means do away with the Hsu or maybe use in another room since the Kreisel has dual drivers. What to do?
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post #23 of 31 Old 02-07-2013, 07:09 AM
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I have one VTF3 MK4 and I won a Ken Kreisel sub 12012. The Kreisel will arrive soon but know I guess that means do away with the Hsu or maybe use in another room since the Kreisel has dual drivers. What to do?

Try them together first. If you can't get them to pay nice then move the other one. Congrats on winning a free sub!
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post #24 of 31 Old 02-07-2013, 07:49 AM
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I just bought a Klipsch RW-12D with the idea of replacing my Klipsch Sub-10. I thought that I would hook up the Sub-10 after I got the RW-12D just to see what it sounded like. I was surprised how much smoother the bass sounded and how it made a difference with the low volume bass. I was going to sell my Sub-10, but instead I think I'm going to run dual subs. I've read on here that the space time continuum would stop and life as we know it on this planet would cease to exists if you run unmatched subs, but my two unmatched subs sounds awesome...smile.gif
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What to do?

If you don't already have, obtain and learn how to use room analyzing capability.
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post #26 of 31 Old 02-07-2013, 08:59 AM - Thread Starter
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I just bought a Klipsch RW-12D with the idea of replacing my Klipsch Sub-10. I thought that I would hook up the Sub-10 after I got the RW-12D just to see what it sounded like. I was surprised how much smoother the bass sounded and how it made a difference with the low volume bass. I was going to sell my Sub-10, but instead I think I'm going to run dual subs. I've read on here that the space time continuum would stop and life as we know it on this planet would cease to exists if you run unmatched subs, but my two unmatched subs sounds awesome...smile.gif

On a good note your subs are the same brand just different specs. I wonder how the Kreisel and Hsu will sound together. In the event that I try both subs what do I need since my avr has only one sub input and I only have the Multeq version of Audyssey?
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On a good note your subs are the same brand just different specs. I wonder how the Kreisel and Hsu will sound together. In the event that I try both subs what do I need since my avr has only one sub input and I only have the Multeq version of Audyssey?

Forgive me for beating on this point, without room analyzing capabilities, you're guessing and not taking full benefit of the subs you have. Just saying.
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post #28 of 31 Old 02-20-2013, 08:16 PM - Thread Starter
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I have a Kreisel 12012 and a Hsu vtf3 mk4 subs. I only have Audyssey with multeq. I know Audyssey states that identical subs is best but I want to try mismatched because that is what I have. I happened to win the Kreisel. Anyways I know I need to run a\Audyssey on the Kreisel but then how can I best EQ the Hsu sub since I do not have the higher level of Audyssey? I also would need to get a Y adapter because the receiver has only one sub output. If someone could please explain how can I best eq the second sub please. Thank you
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post #29 of 31 Old 02-20-2013, 09:40 PM
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Originally Posted by asere View Post

I have a Kreisel 12012 and a Hsu vtf3 mk4 subs. I only have Audyssey with multeq. I know Audyssey states that identical subs is best but I want to try mismatched because that is what I have. I happened to win the Kreisel. Anyways I know I need to run a\Audyssey on the Kreisel but then how can I best EQ the Hsu sub since I do not have the higher level of Audyssey? I also would need to get a Y adapter because the receiver has only one sub output. If someone could please explain how can I best eq the second sub please. Thank you

Here's from Chris Kyriakakis from Audessy:
Many powered subwoofers have controls that are set manually. It's important to follow some simple guidelines to avoid having these controls interfere with proper subwoofer calibration and integration with the satellite speakers.

If the subwoofer provides a direct input (sometimes called LFE input) then it should always be used. That input bypasses the filters in the subwoofer and allows the bass management system in the AV Receiver to operate properly
If there is no direct input, then the lowpass filter knob on the subwoofer should be permanently set to the highest frequency it allows. That way it will not interfere with the MultEQ measurements and bass management
The level control on the subwoofer is often set too high. This can cause the AV Receiver to run out of level correction range when MultEQ tries to set the subwoofer to reference level. Set the subwoofer level control to the midpoint. If MultEQ reports high negative trims (e.g., –12 dB) for the subwoofer, then you should turn the level control further down and run MultEQ again
If there is a Phase control on the sub it should be set to 0°
If you have a subwoofer with room EQ, then you should run that first in the subwoofer and then run MultEQ in the AVR

If you have an external subwoofer processor (such as the SVS AS-EQ1 or the Audyssey Sub Equalizer) you should run the calibration in that processor first and then run MultEQ in your AVR

If you have two subwoofers, there are some additional steps to take:
Place them at equal distances from the main listening position
Set the level controls on the back so they both play at the same level
Connect a y-cord to the sub out of the AVR and then connect to both subs
Turn off processing in the subs as it will not be able to give you the same resolution that you will get from MultEQ (thousands of points vs. a few parametric bands)

Here's what I just did with my two subs (non-matching--both of which are equidistant from my main listening positiion) a few days ago. My Denon receiver has two subwoofer inputs. In your case, you will need to connect a y-cord to the back of your receiver (AVR) and then connect to both subs. Do this later after you have matched the volume of both subs.
Below is elaborating what was summed up above by Chris of Audessy. One can even do this without the suggested spl meter by skipping step 2 below. After step 1 (see below), go to step 3 (see below) but only use one sub at a time (turn off the other sub by unplugging it if you don't have the switch on the back. Also do not use the y cord yet). Start with sub #1 by dialing the sub's volume (knob on the back) at 9 o'clock. In my Denon/Klipsch set up, 12 o'clock is too high resulting in a setting of -12 in Audessy. From here, follow step 3 below. Write down the result because you want the same result for the other sub (aim to have Audyssey set the subwoofer volume in the +/- 1db to 2db range for each sub). Repeat step 3 with subwoofer # 2 (make sure to unplug the power to sub # 1 and then plug the power to sub #2, disconnect the sub cable from sub #1 and connect it to sub #2). Tip: You may have to remeasure several times for each sub to arrive within +/- 1 to 2 db volume set by Audessy and believe me--it's very hard to get both subs the same volume from Audessy--a very slight nudge on the sub's back dial will make a big difference in the Audessy volume! So, between the two subs, a margin of +/- 1 to 2 is acceptable. So once you have set the volume for both subs, do not (ever) touch the volume dial on the back of the subs again! You can still make adjustments thru your receiver.
Then proceed to step 4 and 5.
If you have spl meter, just follow the whole sequence below from step 1 to 5. However, Chris (Audessy) cautioned readers in the use of SPL meters (except for the expensive professional meters) because of their inaccuracy.Thanks.

Step 1: Subwoofer placement. Make sure that the distance from each sub to the primary listening spot is exactly the same. This is because Audyssey calculates distance for only one subwoofer, and if the distance to the two subwoofers is significantly different, the sub delay setting will not produce optimal results. (Unfortunately, this places a severe restriction on where the subs can be placed in most listening rooms. Many experts recommend moving the subs around to achieve the best bass response, but it two subs are used, Audyssey calibration will not be optimal unless the subs are exactly the same distance from the listener.)

Step 2 (optional): Setting the subwoofer levels. Since the acoustic characteristics of the room are likely to be somewhat different for each of the subwoofers because they are in different locations, it’s important to set the volume level for each subwoofer to achieve roughly the same volume at the primary listening spot. This is accomplished as follows:
1. Place a Radio Shack sound pressure meter at the primary listening spot.
2. In the AV receiver setup menu, select Speaker Config/Channel Level, and generate a tone for the subwoofer.
3. Adjust the audio output levels on each subwoofer to achieve the same level at the primary listening spot, as shown on the SPL.
Note: at this point we don’t know if the volume levels on the subs are the correct levels-we only know that the settings produce a balanced output. The next step will determine if the volume settings are too high, too low, or just right.

Step 3: Using Audyssey to determine the initial subwoofer volume setting. Do the following:
1. Run the Audyssey calibration with the microphone in the primary listening spot.
2. After one iteration of the test tones, go ahead and select “calculate”.
3. After the calculation completes, examine the resulting speaker levels.
4. Note the level setting for the subwoofer. If the setting reduces the subwoofer output over 5db (e.g. -8db or -9db), then the subwoofer volume setting is too high. If the setting boosts the subwoofer output by more than 5db (e.g. +8db or +9db), then the subwoofer volume is set too low. The ideal result is to have Audyssey set the subwoofer volume in the +/- 1db to 2db range. Why? Because this allows the greatest flexibility to tweak the subwoofer levels after the Audyssey calibration has completed.
5. If the level setting is too high or too low, cancel the Audyssey calibration, and repeat Steps 2 and 3 until the subwoofer level falls into the +/- 1db to 2db range.

Step 3: Complete the Audyssey calibration. Make sure to use all eight microphone positions!

Step 4: Inspect the resulting speaker configurations after the calibration has completed and make any changes according to your preferences.
1. It is recommended to set all speakers to “small”.
2. Adjust the crossover frequencies for each speaker according to your preferences (e.g. 80 Hz). This does not affect the Audyssey calibration.
3. Set the Audyssey Dynamic Volume for each input according to your preference (e.g. Dynamic Volume “on”, setting “Day”).

Step 5: Test the results! You should hear tight bass integrated seamlessly with your other speakers.
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Originally Posted by beat1 View Post

Here's from Chris Kyriakakis from Audessy:
Many powered subwoofers have controls that are set manually. It's important to follow some simple guidelines to avoid having these controls interfere with proper subwoofer calibration and integration with the satellite speakers.

If the subwoofer provides a direct input (sometimes called LFE input) then it should always be used. That input bypasses the filters in the subwoofer and allows the bass management system in the AV Receiver to operate properly
If there is no direct input, then the lowpass filter knob on the subwoofer should be permanently set to the highest frequency it allows. That way it will not interfere with the MultEQ measurements and bass management
The level control on the subwoofer is often set too high. This can cause the AV Receiver to run out of level correction range when MultEQ tries to set the subwoofer to reference level. Set the subwoofer level control to the midpoint. If MultEQ reports high negative trims (e.g., –12 dB) for the subwoofer, then you should turn the level control further down and run MultEQ again
If there is a Phase control on the sub it should be set to 0°
If you have a subwoofer with room EQ, then you should run that first in the subwoofer and then run MultEQ in the AVR

If you have an external subwoofer processor (such as the SVS AS-EQ1 or the Audyssey Sub Equalizer) you should run the calibration in that processor first and then run MultEQ in your AVR

If you have two subwoofers, there are some additional steps to take:
Place them at equal distances from the main listening position
Set the level controls on the back so they both play at the same level
Connect a y-cord to the sub out of the AVR and then connect to both subs
Turn off processing in the subs as it will not be able to give you the same resolution that you will get from MultEQ (thousands of points vs. a few parametric bands)

Here's what I just did with my two subs (non-matching--both of which are equidistant from my main listening positiion) a few days ago. My Denon receiver has two subwoofer inputs. In your case, you will need to connect a y-cord to the back of your receiver (AVR) and then connect to both subs. Do this later after you have matched the volume of both subs.
Below is elaborating what was summed up above by Chris of Audessy. One can even do this without the suggested spl meter by skipping step 2 below. After step 1 (see below), go to step 3 (see below) but only use one sub at a time (turn off the other sub by unplugging it if you don't have the switch on the back. Also do not use the y cord yet). Start with sub #1 by dialing the sub's volume (knob on the back) at 9 o'clock. In my Denon/Klipsch set up, 12 o'clock is too high resulting in a setting of -12 in Audessy. From here, follow step 3 below. Write down the result because you want the same result for the other sub (aim to have Audyssey set the subwoofer volume in the +/- 1db to 2db range for each sub). Repeat step 3 with subwoofer # 2 (make sure to unplug the power to sub # 1 and then plug the power to sub #2, disconnect the sub cable from sub #1 and connect it to sub #2). Tip: You may have to remeasure several times for each sub to arrive within +/- 1 to 2 db volume set by Audessy and believe me--it's very hard to get both subs the same volume from Audessy--a very slight nudge on the sub's back dial will make a big difference in the Audessy volume! So, between the two subs, a margin of +/- 1 to 2 is acceptable. So once you have set the volume for both subs, do not (ever) touch the volume dial on the back of the subs again! You can still make adjustments thru your receiver.
Then proceed to step 4 and 5.
If you have spl meter, just follow the whole sequence below from step 1 to 5. However, Chris (Audessy) cautioned readers in the use of SPL meters (except for the expensive professional meters) because of their inaccuracy.Thanks.

Step 1: Subwoofer placement. Make sure that the distance from each sub to the primary listening spot is exactly the same. This is because Audyssey calculates distance for only one subwoofer, and if the distance to the two subwoofers is significantly different, the sub delay setting will not produce optimal results. (Unfortunately, this places a severe restriction on where the subs can be placed in most listening rooms. Many experts recommend moving the subs around to achieve the best bass response, but it two subs are used, Audyssey calibration will not be optimal unless the subs are exactly the same distance from the listener.)

Step 2 (optional): Setting the subwoofer levels. Since the acoustic characteristics of the room are likely to be somewhat different for each of the subwoofers because they are in different locations, it’s important to set the volume level for each subwoofer to achieve roughly the same volume at the primary listening spot. This is accomplished as follows:
1. Place a Radio Shack sound pressure meter at the primary listening spot.
2. In the AV receiver setup menu, select Speaker Config/Channel Level, and generate a tone for the subwoofer.
3. Adjust the audio output levels on each subwoofer to achieve the same level at the primary listening spot, as shown on the SPL.
Note: at this point we don’t know if the volume levels on the subs are the correct levels-we only know that the settings produce a balanced output. The next step will determine if the volume settings are too high, too low, or just right.

Step 3: Using Audyssey to determine the initial subwoofer volume setting. Do the following:
1. Run the Audyssey calibration with the microphone in the primary listening spot.
2. After one iteration of the test tones, go ahead and select “calculate”.
3. After the calculation completes, examine the resulting speaker levels.
4. Note the level setting for the subwoofer. If the setting reduces the subwoofer output over 5db (e.g. -8db or -9db), then the subwoofer volume setting is too high. If the setting boosts the subwoofer output by more than 5db (e.g. +8db or +9db), then the subwoofer volume is set too low. The ideal result is to have Audyssey set the subwoofer volume in the +/- 1db to 2db range. Why? Because this allows the greatest flexibility to tweak the subwoofer levels after the Audyssey calibration has completed.
5. If the level setting is too high or too low, cancel the Audyssey calibration, and repeat Steps 2 and 3 until the subwoofer level falls into the +/- 1db to 2db range.

Step 3: Complete the Audyssey calibration. Make sure to use all eight microphone positions!

Step 4: Inspect the resulting speaker configurations after the calibration has completed and make any changes according to your preferences.
1. It is recommended to set all speakers to “small”.
2. Adjust the crossover frequencies for each speaker according to your preferences (e.g. 80 Hz). This does not affect the Audyssey calibration.
3. Set the Audyssey Dynamic Volume for each input according to your preference (e.g. Dynamic Volume “on”, setting “Day”).

Step 5: Test the results! You should hear tight bass integrated seamlessly with your other speakers.

Thank you for taking your time to explain all this in fine detail. I will calibrate sub #1 with Audyssey and then disconnect sub #1 and connect sub #2 and calibrate and then connect both subs and do a final Audyssey run. Hope I got this right!
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