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post #1 of 70 Old 06-27-2013, 11:38 AM - Thread Starter
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Here is what I have today:

 

* HT room/area: 20’ x 16’x 7.5’ (L x W x H), 2400 ft^3

I call it ‘room/area’ because while this area is acoustically treated, its left and right ‘walls’ consist of hanging panels made out of 2” OC703. This ‘room’ is located in an otherwise unfinished basement of approx. 7200 ft^3.

The acoustic treatments work well to keep the higher frequencies in check. However, when it comes to LFE acoustics it seems that I would need to consider the entire space of 7200 ft^3.

 

Equipment:

* Integra DTR 70.4

* LRC and surrounds: Klipsch THX Ultra2 HT Series: (3) KL-650-THX LCRs and (4) KS-525-THX surrounds

* Projector and CIH screen set up, 2 + 2 tiered seating

* Current subs:  (2) SVS PC13 Ultra (BASH), placed (1) each at front and back center

 

Currently not in use:

* Pinnacle sub Digital Sub 600 (dual 12”, 600 watts system power), http://www.pinnaclespeakers.com/ds600.html (Initially, I tried to integrate this sub with the 2 Ultras, but gave up. I seemed to be doing more harm than good. I think this was mainly due to my rather limited skills in this area.)

* Behringer DCX2496, http://www.behringer.com/EN/Products/DCX2496.aspx (bought for my attempt above, but with my current setup (MultEQ Pro and the Ultra’s DSP/EQ settings) I currently see no need for it.

 

Also available:

* Audyssey Pro Kit for MultEQ Pro XT32

* REW with micro, however I have limited system experience/knowledge

 

 

 

Movie/Music ratio is 95% / 5%

Budget: as little as possible, but I am perfectly OK to spend a few grand if the result at the end is fully satisfactory.

 

Here is what I am looking for:

More punch in the 10-20 Hz area and a more tactile experience.

 

What is the best way to achieve this?

 

I would prefer to keep my existing equipment and integrate additional subs in the setup? However, this might not be as easy for me (see above).

Is it better to sell off my subs and get bigger ones?

What subs should I be looking at?

 

DIY vs. manufactured subs is the next topic. I am very open to DIY, but have only limited access to tools. Flat packs may be a solution.

 

I am looking forward to your guidance and suggestions.

_____

Axel 
 


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post #2 of 70 Old 06-27-2013, 12:32 PM
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To chase after 10 Hz, I would build a bunch of sealed subs. You can get flatpacks here, I would go for a bunch of 18"s, as many as you can afford. The value of going DIY is soo much higher than buying a commercial sub. $3k should be enough to do at least four 18" subs. Four of these flat packs: $500, four of these drivers: $1k, two of these two channel amplifiers: $800, and EQ stuff if you need more than the DCX, plus other odds and ends like binding posts and veneer, etc should come in under $700. Altogether that should get you some pretty strong deep bass for under $3k. I would ask about details regarding how to proceed in the DIY forum.
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post #3 of 70 Old 06-27-2013, 12:39 PM
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for 15hz, build a pair of gjallarhorns. For 10hz do several 18 inch sealed.
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post #4 of 70 Old 06-27-2013, 12:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Axel View Post

Here is what I am looking for:
More punch in the 10-20 Hz area and a more tactile experience.

"Punch" (the bass you feel in your chest) does not come from 10-20Hz, it comes mostly from 60-200Hz and requires proper time alignment between speakers and subs.
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post #5 of 70 Old 06-27-2013, 01:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Decadent_Spectre View Post

"Punch" (the bass you feel in your chest) does not come from 10-20Hz, it comes mostly from 60-200Hz and requires proper time alignment between speakers and subs.
IME 50-70Hz is the main area, and if what you're after is that take your breath away live concert experience you need it at least 110dB at the listening position. 10-20Hz is what I'd call rumble, as in an earthquake, not punch.

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post #6 of 70 Old 06-27-2013, 01:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post

IME 50-70Hz is the main area, and if what you're after is that take your breath away live concert experience you need it at least 110dB at the listening position. 10-20Hz is what I'd call rumble, as in an earthquake, not punch.

I've found that the 50-70Hz region is the lower part of the punch, the resonance if you will, the initial "piercing" attack comes from the region above it, without which it doesn't really "hit" you. Of course the entire region must be produced with no smearing in time to give the effect of good punch. Personally I think that the region from 90-150Hz is the most important for satisfying punch but I suppose it depends on taste as always.
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post #7 of 70 Old 06-27-2013, 03:30 PM
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This bottom of this chart which is normally used for audio mixing helps to show the frequency ranges where some of the terms we use occur. You'll notice ranges for "Punch" (+/- 125HZ), "Thump" (+/- 30HZ) and some others which may help you. If you are trying to hear more/less of a certain instrument sound you can use the top part of the chart to determine which frequencies can be used boosted/cut to tailor the sound to what you want.


If you use the link then the chart is interactive and gives you some additional information for instruments and frequency spectrum ranges.
Enjoy!
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post #8 of 70 Old 06-27-2013, 03:49 PM
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Incase you do decide to look at flat packs down the road here is something to consider. They are making the DIY option much easier nowadays.





http://www.parts-express.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?partnumber=300-7094

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post #9 of 70 Old 06-27-2013, 04:21 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steve nn View Post

Incase you do decide to look at flat packs down the road here is something to consider. They are making the DIY option much easier nowadays.





http://www.parts-express.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?partnumber=300-7094


Thanks Steve; I have seen those flat packs already. If I go the DIY route, they seem to be a very good option for me. From what I understand there are same that shadyJ had linked to earlier.

 

____

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post #10 of 70 Old 06-27-2013, 04:28 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Decadent_Spectre View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Axel View Post

Here is what I am looking for:
More punch in the 10-20 Hz area and a more tactile experience.

"Punch" (the bass you feel in your chest) does not come from 10-20Hz, it comes mostly from 60-200Hz and requires proper time alignment between speakers and subs.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Decadent_Spectre View Post

"Punch" (the bass you feel in your chest) does not come from 10-20Hz, it comes mostly from 60-200Hz and requires proper time alignment between speakers and subs.
IME 50-70Hz is the main area, and if what you're after is that take your breath away live concert experience you need it at least 110dB at the listening position. 10-20Hz is what I'd call rumble, as in an earthquake, not punch.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Decadent_Spectre View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice View Post

IME 50-70Hz is the main area, and if what you're after is that take your breath away live concert experience you need it at least 110dB at the listening position. 10-20Hz is what I'd call rumble, as in an earthquake, not punch.

I've found that the 50-70Hz region is the lower part of the punch, the resonance if you will, the initial "piercing" attack comes from the region above it, without which it doesn't really "hit" you. Of course the entire region must be produced with no smearing in time to give the effect of good punch. Personally I think that the region from 90-150Hz is the most important for satisfying punch but I suppose it depends on taste as always.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by walterappleby View Post

This bottom of this chart which is normally used for audio mixing helps to show the frequency ranges where some of the terms we use occur. You'll notice ranges for "Punch" (+/- 125HZ), "Thump" (+/- 30HZ) and some others which may help you. If you are trying to hear more/less of a certain instrument sound you can use the top part of the chart to determine which frequencies can be used boosted/cut to tailor the sound to what you want.


If you use the link then the chart is interactive and gives you some additional information for instruments and frequency spectrum ranges.
Enjoy!

 

 

 

Thanks much guys, that helps. I guess I am looking for Chest/Thump with some rumble smile.gif

_____

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post #11 of 70 Old 06-27-2013, 04:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Axel View Post


Thanks Steve; I have seen those flat packs already. If I go the DIY route, they seem to be a very good option for me. From what I understand there are same that shadyJ had linked to earlier.

____
Axel

No his were a little different but things are definitely a changin. MDF dust is a real pain in the arss!! Back when I was building subs the flat-pack wasn't a option, it’s nice to see such a nice option come out. As you can see the enclosures are built very well and it’s Erich that builds them for PE. They just ad a driver with the package is all. So in essence they are the same. smile.gif

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post #12 of 70 Old 06-27-2013, 04:57 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shadyJ View Post

To chase after 10 Hz, I would build a bunch of sealed subs. You can get flatpacks here, I would go for a bunch of 18"s, as many as you can afford. The value of going DIY is soo much higher than buying a commercial sub. $3k should be enough to do at least four 18" subs. Four of these flat packs: $500, four of these drivers: $1k, two of these two channel amplifiers: $800, and EQ stuff if you need more than the DCX, plus other odds and ends like binding posts and veneer, etc should come in under $700. Altogether that should get you some pretty strong deep bass for under $3k. I would ask about details regarding how to proceed in the DIY forum.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by stormwind13 View Post

for 15hz, build a pair of gjallarhorns. For 10hz do several 18 inch sealed.

 

 

Hmmm, several 18" and maybe DIY... That's actually what I have started leaning towards after having spent already quite a bit of time reading up here and at the HTS. Good to hear that I may be not too far off.

 

 

So, but should I still try to integrate my Ultras and maybe resurrect my Pinnacle or should I better go multiple 18" only?

_____

Axel


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post #13 of 70 Old 06-27-2013, 07:04 PM
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I would sell them and get the sealed 18"s. I wouldn't want to try to integrate those with the 18"s, their performance is too different for that to work well.
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post #14 of 70 Old 06-27-2013, 08:30 PM
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I would sell them and get the sealed 18"s. I wouldn't want to try to integrate those with the 18"s, their performance is too different for that to work well.

DEFINITELY!

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post #15 of 70 Old 06-27-2013, 08:38 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks shady and steve. These are clear statements.

So how many 18" flat box subs do you suggest I need? Is 4 the right number?
____
Axel

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post #16 of 70 Old 06-27-2013, 08:56 PM
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Depends on the driver...but for the less expensive ones, I'd say you need at least 8 for that 7200cf. But probably more if you want 10hz at reference.

IMO, I'd go with two gjallarhorns or commercially 2 OS's. I think what you're missing is clean output at reference levels in that huge space. That will have more of an impact tactically and subjectively than non reference level output at 10hz. Now if you can get it all, then go for it! You'll just need lots of sealed displacement.
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post #17 of 70 Old 06-28-2013, 01:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Axel View Post

Thanks shady and steve. These are clear statements.

So how many 18" flat box subs do you suggest I need? Is 4 the right number?
____
Axel

At least 4. More if you can. The ports on your PC13s do give them quite a bit of output at their tuning point, 15 or 20 Hz, whatever you set it to. I think we have enough information to do a comparison in this case. Luckily Josh Ricci has measured both the Stereo Integrity 18"s and Dayton RS 18"s in a 4'^3 cabinet, which are the drivers those flat packs are made for. He also has measurements for the PB13, which according to SVS are the same as the PC13. (Ricci is a treasure, visit his site for a thorough comparison) Here are some numbers for you:



You can see the Stereo Integrity has a bit better performance than the Dayton RS, with a 2 dB+ lead at 10 Hz, so if you are shooting for 10 Hz, go for the Stereo Integrity drivers. You can order the Stereo Integrity drivers here, after shipping they will be maybe $250 each is my guess.

Now lets see what you will need to simply equal a PC13 Ultra at 16 hz. The PC13 has about a 7 dB lead over the SI driver at 16 hz. Co-locating another SI sub will give it a 6 dB boost, but it still has 2x the distortion of the PC13. Co-locating another SI driver will give it a further 3 dB boost, or at least take distortion down to a comparable level to the PC13. However, three co-located SI drivers will bring your 10 Hz performance up to 98 dB, while the PC13 isn't going to give you any kind of 10 Hz output at all. Keep in mind, that three co-located SI subs will take your mid bass performance through the roof, at over 130 dB from 60 Hz on up, and well over 120 dB from 30 to 50 Hz. Those are live audio SPLs.

To sum it up, you need three SI drivers to equal a single PC13 at it tuning point, but everywhere else three SI subs will have a huge advantage. Since you want to surpass the performance of the two PC13s in every respect, I would shoot for six SI subs. If you want 10 Hz at reference level (115 dB), you are going to need more than six SI subs, a lot more, but it will depend on your room gain. If your room isn't helping you out, I think you will need over 16 SI subs to hit 10 Hz at 115 dB at all, and probably over 20 to do it cleanly.
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post #18 of 70 Old 06-28-2013, 04:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walterappleby View Post

This bottom of this chart which is normally used for audio mixing helps to show the frequency ranges where some of the terms we use occur. You'll notice ranges for "Punch" (+/- 125HZ), "Thump" (+/- 30HZ) and some others which may help you. If you are trying to hear more/less of a certain instrument sound you can use the top part of the chart to determine which frequencies can be used boosted/cut to tailor the sound to what you want.


Enjoy!

Walter,

I'm digging the chart. Thanks for posting.
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post #19 of 70 Old 06-28-2013, 04:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shadyJ View Post

You can see the Stereo Integrity has a bit better performance than the Dayton RS, with a 2 dB+ lead at 10 Hz, so if you are shooting for 10 Hz, go for the Stereo Integrity drivers. You can order the Stereo Integrity drivers here, after shipping they will be maybe $250 each is my guess.
Meh, I'd say $230 tops. The most I have seen for shipping a single sub was like $38...and that was shipping from SI to SoCal IIRC. Their site says to contact them directly if ordering 6 or more. Not sure if that implies that they offer a discount for ordering higher quantities, but that could be an added benefit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shadyJ View Post

Now lets see what you will need to simply equal a PC13 Ultra at 16 hz. The PC13 has about a 7 dB lead over the SI driver at 16 hz. Co-locating another SI sub will give it a 6 dB boost, but it still has 2x the distortion of the PC13. Co-locating another SI driver will give it a further 3 dB boost, or at least take distortion down to a comparable level to the PC13. However, three co-located SI drivers will bring your 10 Hz performance up to 98 dB, while the PC13 isn't going to give you any kind of 10 Hz output at all.
+1

Quote:
Originally Posted by shadyJ View Post

Keep in mind, that three co-located SI subs will take your mid bass performance through the roof, at over 130 dB from 60 Hz on up, and well over 120 dB from 30 to 50 Hz. Those are live audio SPLs.
Mid-Bass is absolutely ridiculous. Could be good for some, but I personally tend to tame most of the mid-bass area to shift the emphasis to the infrasound region.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shadyJ View Post

To sum it up, you need three SI drivers to equal a single PC13 at it tuning point, but everywhere else three SI subs will have a huge advantage. Since you want to surpass the performance of the two PC13s in every respect, I would shoot for six SI subs. If you want 10 Hz at reference level (115 dB), you are going to need more than six SI subs, a lot more, but it will depend on your room gain.
Nice summation. +1 on the room gain front. I always say its better safe than sorry, so do what you need to do to attempt to put the upgrade bug to rest. 8 SI's and a single FP14K Clone is the performance/price deal of the decade IMO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shadyJ View Post

If your room isn't helping you out, I think you will need over 16 SI subs to hit 10 Hz at 115 dB at all, and probably over 20 to do it cleanly.
Nearfield helps as well... If the OP ends up going this route and scoops up multiple 18's, if he can possibly throw a few behind his seating area (or close) it would go further in helping him achieve his "punch/rumble" goals.

biggrin.gif
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post #20 of 70 Old 06-28-2013, 06:03 AM
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He also has measurements for the PB13, which according to SVS are the same as the PC13.

I have always been under the impression there was about a 1dB difference between the PB versus the PC Ultra. Not sure where that came from but if memory serves me correct, I have even seen Ed suggest this. confused.gif

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post #21 of 70 Old 06-28-2013, 07:23 AM
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In addition to DIY you may also want to consider a SubMersive or a sealed Captivator. Granted, they are both pricey... but they will give you that rumble that you are missing. You may find that just going to a competent sealed setup will give you what you feel is missing. Your ultras are dropping like stones below their tuning frequency. A good sealed sub (especially considering decent room gain) will give you extension down to at least 10 Hz. As others have mentioned though, it may take many multiples of that sealed sub to get you discernable output down that low. It will really depend on how good your room gain is. There are many incidences of comparable setups performing radically differently just due to room characteristics. The cheapest way to see what will work for you may be to get one of the flat packs and see how they perform. A single sealed 18" will give you a good idea of your rooms particular response curve. If you like the sound, then you would just have to start adding multiples to get the output to your desired level. If the sound is not to your liking, it shouldn't be too hard to sell the sub and recoup a good portion of your money.
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post #22 of 70 Old 06-28-2013, 07:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Axel View Post

Budget: as little as possible, but I am perfectly OK to spend a few grand if the result at the end is fully satisfactory.

 

Here is what I am looking for:

More punch in the 10-20 Hz area and a more tactile experience.

 

What is the best way to achieve this?

 

As you can see, mutually exclusive.

ButtKickers, anyone?


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post #23 of 70 Old 06-28-2013, 07:58 AM
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While there are much cheaper ways around this now, this is what I use to pull the response down in the lower regions with my DIY sealed’s.. sure makes a world of difference.



http://www.marchandelec.com/wm8.html

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post #24 of 70 Old 06-28-2013, 08:34 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shadyJ View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Axel View Post

Thanks shady and steve. These are clear statements.

So how many 18" flat box subs do you suggest I need? Is 4 the right number?
____
Axel

At least 4. More if you can. The ports on your PC13s do give them quite a bit of output at their tuning point, 15 or 20 Hz, whatever you set it to. I think we have enough information to do a comparison in this case. Luckily Josh Ricci has measured both the Stereo Integrity 18"s and Dayton RS 18"s in a 4'^3 cabinet, which are the drivers those flat packs are made for. He also has measurements for the PB13, which according to SVS are the same as the PC13. (Ricci is a treasure, visit his site for a thorough comparison) Here are some numbers for you:



You can see the Stereo Integrity has a bit better performance than the Dayton RS, with a 2 dB+ lead at 10 Hz, so if you are shooting for 10 Hz, go for the Stereo Integrity drivers. You can order the Stereo Integrity drivers here, after shipping they will be maybe $250 each is my guess.

Now lets see what you will need to simply equal a PC13 Ultra at 16 hz. The PC13 has about a 7 dB lead over the SI driver at 16 hz. Co-locating another SI sub will give it a 6 dB boost, but it still has 2x the distortion of the PC13. Co-locating another SI driver will give it a further 3 dB boost, or at least take distortion down to a comparable level to the PC13. However, three co-located SI drivers will bring your 10 Hz performance up to 98 dB, while the PC13 isn't going to give you any kind of 10 Hz output at all. Keep in mind, that three co-located SI subs will take your mid bass performance through the roof, at over 130 dB from 60 Hz on up, and well over 120 dB from 30 to 50 Hz. Those are live audio SPLs.

To sum it up, you need three SI drivers to equal a single PC13 at it tuning point, but everywhere else three SI subs will have a huge advantage. Since you want to surpass the performance of the two PC13s in every respect, I would shoot for six SI subs. If you want 10 Hz at reference level (115 dB), you are going to need more than six SI subs, a lot more, but it will depend on your room gain. If your room isn't helping you out, I think you will need over 16 SI subs to hit 10 Hz at 115 dB at all, and probably over 20 to do it cleanly.

 

shady, thank you for posting the charts and also providing an analysis. I would like to better understand how to read the charts. From what I understand you were comparing MAX PASS SPL levels at different frequency points. Here the criteria seems 'the higher the better', with 6 dB being a doubling is perceived loudness. Correct so far? What else is of importance? What about the color coding?   

I would greatly appreciate if you could provide a bit more insight here.

 

 

 

My SVS Ultras have the earlier BASH amps. I believe they have some 700 W or maybe 800 W, not 1000 W, what Ricci measured. Is there a way to assess in what way this would reflect in above charts?

 

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post #25 of 70 Old 06-28-2013, 08:44 AM - Thread Starter
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Budget: as little as possible, but I am perfectly OK to spend a few grand if the result at the end is fully satisfactory.

 

Here is what I am looking for:

More punch in the 10-20 Hz area and a more tactile experience.

 

What is the best way to achieve this?

 

As you can see, mutually exclusive.

ButtKickers, anyone?

 

My comment was meant that I want to spend my money wisely - see the second part of my first sentence. In this context, if I can achieve with DIY solutions results close to what I can get with manufactured subs, but at a significantly lower cost, I prefer that.  

 

BTW, I tried the ButtKicker route. Some may call it 'fake bass' and it may work for some. But it's not for me, I rather prefer 'real bass'.

 

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In addition to DIY you may also want to consider a SubMersive or a sealed Captivator. Granted, they are both pricey... but they will give you that rumble that you are missing. You may find that just going to a competent sealed setup will give you what you feel is missing. Your ultras are dropping like stones below their tuning frequency. A good sealed sub (especially considering decent room gain) will give you extension down to at least 10 Hz. As others have mentioned though, it may take many multiples of that sealed sub to get you discernable output down that low. It will really depend on how good your room gain is. There are many incidences of comparable setups performing radically differently just due to room characteristics. ....

 

I have been also looking into dual SubMersives or dual S2 Captivator. We are talking somewhere between $4,500 and $6,000. At this point I am not sure I would like to spend this kind of money, if DIY could get me close to it for a lot less.

 

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.... The cheapest way to see what will work for you may be to get one of the flat packs and see how they perform. A single sealed 18" will give you a good idea of your rooms particular response curve. If you like the sound, then you would just have to start adding multiples to get the output to your desired level. If the sound is not to your liking, it shouldn't be too hard to sell the sub and recoup a good portion of your money.

 

I think this is good advise, Adam. Maybe I should start at least with 2, though.smile.gif

 

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While there are much cheaper ways around this now, this is what I use to pull the response down in the lower regions with my DIY sealed’s.. sure makes a world of difference.



http://www.marchandelec.com/wm8.html

 

 

steve, how does this device differ from my Behringer DCX2496?

 

TIA!

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steve, how does this device differ from my Behringer DCX2496?

TIA!
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I had previously had (laying in a box of cables now) a 2496 and never did like what it did to the flavor of my bass, that was my own experience and opinion. I have heard of a few others bring this up also, but it’s been a very long time ago. I wish I could explain the technical aspect of the BASSIS to you but I can’t. What I do know is that it pulls the hump out of a sealed’s response and then applies that to the lower end extension. I’m sure it does more but that is my simple understanding of the device. It can shape and dampen things to what I like. I don’t know if you ever heard of him, but Bosso has been a tremendous asset in helping me set and apply the BASSIS correctly. He always gives me a set of perimeters to work within to shape the bass to my liking. My last build was two 18” Mae-X
drivers to replace two PC-13Ultra’s. While I really liked the ULTRA’s, the two sealed 18” Mae-X incorporated with the BASSIS was just what I was looking for. Lets just say they were like two very well behaved ULTRA’s to keep it simple. smile.gif





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While there are much cheaper ways around this now, this is what I use to pull the response down in the lower regions with my DIY sealed’s.. sure makes a world of difference.



http://www.marchandelec.com/wm8.html


steve, how does this device differ from my Behringer DCX2496?

(1) The BASSIS is a special kind of equalizer, designed to correct the LF response of a typical speaker. It implements this kind of equalization:



This is a very special-purpose kind of equalizer, but it is likely to be very helpful when used with a subwoofer.

(2) A DCX2496 is a crossover that also has a limited-function equalizer, but that limited function is very different than that of the BASSIS.

(3) The Behringer device that is more similar to a BASSIS would be the DEQ2496, but it is still significantly different.
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While there are much cheaper ways around this now, this is what I use to pull the response down in the lower regions with my DIY sealed’s.. sure makes a world of difference.



http://www.marchandelec.com/wm8.html


steve, how does this device differ from my Behringer DCX2496?

(1) The BASSIS is a special kind of equalizer, designed to correct the LF response of a typical speaker. It implements this kind of equalization:



This is a very special-purpose kind of equalizer, but it is likely to be very helpful when used with a subwoofer.

(2) A DCX2496 is a crossover that also has a limited-function equalizer, but that limited function is very different than that of the BASSIS.

(3) The Behringer device that is more similar to a BASSIS would be the DEQ2496, but it is still significantly different.

 

Thank you for the explanation, Neighbor!  (I am in Farmington Hills.)

 

edit: forgot to ask how a miniDSP, I keep hearing about, fits into this mix.

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