Dolby ups TrueHD lossless audio on Blu-ray to 96k - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 23 Old 05-18-2012, 11:08 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Just because your home theater can handle lossless audio doesn't mean the sound is as good as it could be. Dolby is now giving Blu-ray producers using Dolby Media Producer Encoder v2 the choice of premastering TrueHD surround sound at an upsampled 96k. Along with just squeezing the most possible clarity and depth out of 48kHz audio, the encoding purportedly eliminates some of the harshness of digital sound through an apodizing (signal altering) filter. At least three projects have already been given the 96k treatment, and authoring firms like Technicolor have upgrades in place to give that noticeable boost to your next Blu-ray movie.

http://www.engadget.com/2012/05/18/d...lu-ray-to-96k/

Now all they need is to get more titles on disc with Dolby...
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post #2 of 23 Old 05-18-2012, 07:42 PM
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Originally Posted by dvdmike007 View Post

Now all they need is to get more titles on disc with Dolby...

I think that is the intended outcome.
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post #3 of 23 Old 05-18-2012, 08:28 PM
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post #4 of 23 Old 05-19-2012, 09:55 PM
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What's the point , are studios mixing in 24/96 now?
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post #5 of 23 Old 05-20-2012, 12:24 AM
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Originally Posted by netudki View Post

What's the point , are studios mixing in 24/96 now?

No. And that's the point.
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post #6 of 23 Old 05-22-2012, 03:04 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thought that was for press releases and this was for discussion?
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post #7 of 23 Old 05-24-2012, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by netudki View Post

What's the point , are studios mixing in 24/96 now?

Any decent digital mixer now days is 24bit/96kHz.
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post #8 of 23 Old 05-24-2012, 02:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Roger Dressler View Post

No. And that's the point.


Point of what, another up sampling/converting technique "borrowed" from Meridian?
Just read an article on S&V and apparently the invited guests were impressed with the demonstration they heard at Dolby HQ SF, your former workplace I guess. Does Dolby perform demonstrations to non industry types also?

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post #9 of 23 Old 05-24-2012, 04:44 PM
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Originally Posted by thehun View Post

Point of what, another up sampling/converting technique "borrowed" from Meridian?

Another? What was the other?

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Point of what, another up sampling/converting technique "borrowed" from Meridian?

"Borrowed"? What does that mean? It is a transaction between long-time business partners.

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Does Dolby perform demonstrations to non industry types also?

It has done while I was there. Occasionally. Why?
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post #10 of 23 Old 05-24-2012, 04:45 PM
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Originally Posted by SoNic67 View Post

Yes. Any decent digital mixer now days is 24bit/96kHz.

The mixers may be capable of 96 kHz, but they are not being used that way for movie soundtracks.
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post #11 of 23 Old 05-24-2012, 07:15 PM
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Bluray holds concerts too...

True, the movies soundtracks don't need DolbyTrueHD (former DVD-A MLP), good ol' DTS was more than enough.
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post #12 of 23 Old 05-24-2012, 08:19 PM
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Originally Posted by SoNic67 View Post

Bluray holds concerts too...

True, the movies soundtracks don't need DolbyTrueHD (former DVD-A MLP), good ol' DTS was more than enough.

Um, what?


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post #13 of 23 Old 05-25-2012, 07:39 AM
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This is great. I heard some concert BD's at 96khz and they sound amazing. The movie sex lies and videotape is 96khz if anyone didn't know. On that movie the higher freqencies is more noticeable. Akira is also 96khz.

Can't DTHD already do 96khz and up to 192khz? Whats make this process different?

l wonder how DTS will respond to this.

edit- this thread should be in the audio section.

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post #14 of 23 Old 05-25-2012, 12:56 PM
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Originally Posted by PeterTHX View Post

Um, what?

Whan a movie soundtrack (not concert) will have upper frequency in excess of 14kHz and dynamic in excess of 60dB call back...
Till then DTS is more than sufficient.
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post #15 of 23 Old 05-25-2012, 01:19 PM
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Originally Posted by saprano View Post

Can't DTHD already do 96khz and up to 192khz? Whats make this process different?

If the source is 96 or 192 kHz, TrueHD can carry it. The problem here is that movies are mixed at 48 kHz, and likely to stay that way for good reason.

I would add that now that more is known about why 96 kHz sounds better than 44.1/48 kHz (phase/pre-ringing, not bandwidth) and that those benefits can be achieved at the playback side with improved filtering, it really begs the question if it is necessary to use higher sample rates in future. It may be an unnecessary extravagance. Seems having ~20 bits of resolution is a better use of transmission resources.
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post #16 of 23 Old 05-25-2012, 01:23 PM
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Originally Posted by saprano View Post

This is great. I heard some concert BD's at 96khz and they sound amazing. The movie sex lies and videotape is 96khz if anyone didn't know. On that movie the higher freqencies is more noticeable. Akira is also 96khz.

The Japanese 5.1 Dolby TrueHD track on Akira is actually 192kHz

Quote:


Can't DTHD already do 96khz and up to 192khz? Whats make this process different?

This is upsampling at the master to eliminate digital errors.

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l wonder how DTS will respond to this.

Probably will announce a 64-bit 1GHz 256.2-channel upsampling version.

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post #17 of 23 Old 05-25-2012, 01:25 PM
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Originally Posted by SoNic67 View Post

Whan a movie soundtrack (not concert) will have upper frequency in excess of 14kHz and dynamic in excess of 60dB call back...
Till then DTS is more than sufficient.

Um, plenty of film soundtracks run in far greater excess than that.

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post #18 of 23 Old 05-25-2012, 10:14 PM
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Originally Posted by saprano View Post

This is great. I heard some concert BD's at 96khz and they sound amazing. The movie sex lies and videotape is 96khz if anyone didn't know. On that movie the higher freqencies is more noticeable. Akira is also 96khz.

Can't DTHD already do 96khz and up to 192khz? Whats make this process different?

l wonder how DTS will respond to this.

edit- this thread should be in the audio section.

Few people over the age of 25 can hear 20kHz. If you live in an urban or today's suburban environments and have either worked in noisy environments, spend a lot of time on subway platforms or go to music clubs or concerts, you probably can't hear anything over 15kHz, but even that doesn't matter because movie soundtracks start rolling off at relatively low frequencies.

However, there are other reasons to use higher sampling rates that benefit the audio. Any audio that has complex waveforms in which there are many changes in audio in short intervals will benefit because at lower sampling rates it's possible to miss changes in audio that come between the samples.

Think of it this way: you start out on 40th street. You wind up on 43rd street. Maybe you walked directly up Broadway from 40th street to 43rd street. Or maybe you headed west on 40th street to 8th Avenue walked up 8th avenue, then headed back east to Broadway and 43rd street. At high sampling rates, you picked up the whole route. At low sampling rates, you just picked up the starting and ending point. That's why higher sampling rates sound better (or more accurate) not because they increase the maximum possible frequency response. For that, 44.1kHz (CD sample rate) is enough.
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post #19 of 23 Old 06-16-2012, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Roger Dressler View Post


Another? What was the other?


"Borrowed"? What does that mean? It is a transaction between long-time business partners.

It has done while I was there. Occasionally. Why?


"borrowed" = wasn't invented by Dolby also see "licensed"
Other technology from Meridian[ and you know this] was MLP though it isn't an up sampling/converting technology hence your confusion, but it was the base for DTHD
The reason I asked about demo for the plebs is that I don't really trust industry "golden ears"
S&V recently visited Dolby to audition this technology and they had the usual impression like many times before they heard a "new" technology.

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post #20 of 23 Old 06-16-2012, 09:17 AM
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Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post


Few people over the age of 25 can hear 20kHz. If you live in an urban or today's suburban environments and have either worked in noisy environments, spend a lot of time on subway platforms or go to music clubs or concerts, you probably can't hear anything over 15kHz, but even that doesn't matter because movie soundtracks start rolling off at relatively low frequencies.


However, there are other reasons to use higher sampling rates that benefit the audio. Any audio that has complex waveforms in which there are many changes in audio in short intervals will benefit because at lower sampling rates it's possible to miss changes in audio that come between the samples.


Think of it this way: you start out on 40th street. You wind up on 43rd street. Maybe you walked directly up Broadway from 40th street to 43rd street. Or maybe you headed west on 40th street to 8th Avenue walked up 8th avenue, then headed back east to Broadway and 43rd street. At high sampling rates, you picked up the whole route. At low sampling rates, you just picked up the starting and ending point. That's why higher sampling rates sound better (or more accurate) not because they increase the maximum possible frequency response. For that, 44.1kHz (CD sample rate) is enough.

Came upon this recently:

http://people.xiph.org/~xiphmont/demo/neil-young.html
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post #21 of 23 Old 06-16-2012, 11:28 AM
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Originally Posted by thehun View Post

"borrowed" = wasn't invented by Dolby
Might want to look up the definition. That is not it.
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also see "licensed" Other technology from Meridian[ and you know this] was MLP though it isn't an up sampling/converting technology hence your confusion, but it was the base for DTHD
Yes, I already clarified that "borrowed" was an imprecise choice of words. Since I set up the deals for MLP, TrueHD, and 96 kHz, I am hardly confused as to their true nature.
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The reason I asked about demo for the plebs is that I don't really trust industry "golden ears"
S&V recently visited Dolby to audition this technology and they had the usual impression like many times before they heard a "new" technology.
Ahh. Well, no, they do not have any regular program to conduct ongoing demos. Best shot would be CEDIA or CES, that sort of thing, if they choose to do so that is.
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post #22 of 23 Old 06-16-2012, 11:46 AM
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Originally Posted by thehun View Post

Came upon this recently:
http://people.xiph.org/~xiphmont/demo/neil-young.html
Good article. Thanks for the link. smile.gif
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post #23 of 23 Old 07-02-2012, 04:33 PM
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Just watched new HK movie Nightfall with (a movie not concert first??) Dolby TrueHD 96k track although 16-bit. Very impressive opening scene that sounded demo worthy.

Really like their upsampling and it was easy to hear a difference from the DTS track. Not that I know what levels the tracks was made in so don't take this scientifically

Audio:
Dolby TrueHD Audio Chinese 5567 kbps 7.1 / 96 kHz / 16-bit
DTS-HD Master Audio Chinese 2276 kbps 7.1 / 48 kHz / 16-bit

Knew there was some concerts made but surprised they got a movie made already. Hopefully we will get some blockbuster movies soon also in this format.
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