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post #31 of 48 Old 01-15-2005, 02:30 AM
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Naw I didnt' win the lottery! The old G3 was our old family computer ... it's been upgraded a tiny bit (larger hard drive, new network card, new graphics card) and is running OSX 10.3 Server and runs my web, ftp, and streaming music server. The 20" iMac is my dad's computer actually. The Dual 2ghz G5 (1.5gb ram, 360gb HD space) i paid for ... and as far as the 12" powerbook, well, I originally got a powerbook g3 when i started college in fall 2000, and that powerbook cost nearly $3 grand the way I wanted it ... a year later I sold it for $2200 and then got the (new at the time) powrbook g4 for $200 more, then sold it for Powerbook G4/550 which cost $2000, and then sold it for the 12" powerbook which I got for $1300. So basically the money that paid for the 12" powerbook is the residual of the inital powerbook g3 purchase.

As far as "recoding" or "recompiling" CoreImage and CoreVideo to run on 32MB... that's not gunna happen. The 32meg cards don't have enough memory, let alone power, to support hardware transform and lighting, which I think is what's being leveraged for a lot of effects.

It's not as much a memory limit, as it is an easy way to say which cards support that feature. Apple can just say "needs 64MB vram" intead of "ATI Radeon 8500, 9200, 9600, 9800 ... NVideo GeForce 3, 4, 4MX, 6800, etc" and it also covers the bases for the future.
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post #32 of 48 Old 01-15-2005, 06:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by BoulderGeek
I am biting my tongue, hiding my credit card, and holding off on a Mini until I can get Tiger with it, so I don't have to buy itfor my TiBook as well. .
One thing to be aware of is that apple often ships a version of the OS that will only run on a single machine, so the Tiger on your Mini may not work on your Tibook. However, if you buy the mini immediately after Tiger has shipped, but before it is included in the box, you will probably qualify for the "up to date" program, wherein they will ship you a Tiger disk (probably bootable in any machine) for s&h. This is what happened to me when I bought my albook...the Panther disks I got through "up to date".

I was planning to do the same thing as you...buy a mini so that I could get the up to date versions of OS X, iLife and quicken as part of the deal...dramatically reduces the effective cost of the mini.
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post #33 of 48 Old 01-15-2005, 06:14 PM
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Apple hasn't made hardware-specific OS builds since the System 7 era. Sometimes new machines required additional obscure INITs, but the OS [8 and9] itself was pretty generic. OSX, even moreso. A PowerBook OSX install DVD will boot/install fine on an eMac or whatever.

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post #34 of 48 Old 01-15-2005, 06:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by madSkeelz
Apple hasn't made hardware-specific OS builds since the System 7 era. Sometimes new machines required additional obscure INITs, but the OS [8 and9] itself was pretty generic. OSX, even moreso. A PowerBook OSX install DVD will boot/install fine on an eMac or whatever.
Actually, as recently as the PowerMac G4s (don't now about newer systems) Apple shipped OS installation discs with machines that were made to only install on the same general hardware as the system they shipped with.

They weren't different versions of the OS, but the installers were keyed to specific hardware to prevent pirating of the OS to other systems.

Don't know if this has changed with the G5s and recent G4 i/powerbooks and mini.
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post #35 of 48 Old 01-16-2005, 04:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by JimWCB
Actually, as recently as the PowerMac G4s (don't now about newer systems) Apple shipped OS installation discs with machines that were made to only install on the same general hardware as the system they shipped with.

They weren't different versions of the OS, but the installers were keyed to specific hardware to prevent pirating of the OS to other systems.

Don't know if this has changed with the G5s and recent G4 i/powerbooks and mini.
This is correct for sure. I've had problems with OS disks shipped with both a G3 iMac (with OS 8.6 as I recall), and with G4 disks with OS 9. I haven't had personal experience with OS X disks not being usable on different machines, but I have heard that this is true for some machines.
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post #36 of 48 Old 01-16-2005, 04:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by JimWCB
They weren't different versions of the OS, but the installers were keyed to specific hardware to prevent pirating of the OS to other systems.
Not exactly true, at least to my recollection. I don't think piracy was ever a factor and I never saw a set of 7/8/9 discs Install discs which would only work with the machine they came with (however, the "System Restore" discs were definitely keyed to specific models).

What would happen is this: The OS (7/8/9) was designed only to boot on computers that it knows about, sensibly enough -- if it doesn't recognize the hardware it's on, it puts up an error message and refuses to start. When a new Mac was released, it would come with a version of the current shipping OS with a "System Enabler" file which knows about that particular hardware and enabled the OS to boot. This was necessary until the next revision of Mac OS, which would then know about all hardware to date, making a system enabler file unnecessary.

This made it entirely possible to have the same OS version for different machines whose discs won't install on each other. For example, if a new computer came with, say, Mac OS 8.5, then its discs could be installed on any Mac which was shipping when 8.5 was released, but they wouldn't work on any Mac which shipped after 8.5 was released, even if it also came with 8.5 discs.

Then, when 8.6 came out, any 8.6 installer would work on any of the machines we just mentioned, because vanilla 8.6 knew about the hardware. And then new machines would ship with 8.6 plus an enabler, and the cycle would repeat until 9.0 came out.

They were shipping System Enablers right up until the end, so the last G4's only work with the discs they shipped with, and you can't use a vanilla 9.2.2 installer for them -- though its discs install on all Macs except those which came out after 9.2.2.

As for Mac OS X, I have always been able to use the installer disc on another machines, up through 10.3.4. However, the office I work in bought an iMac G5 which came with 10.3.5, and that installer refused to install on any other computer, the first time I've seen that be the case. This could be either to force you to buy copies for your old machines, OR it could be a more restrictive version of the 7/8/9 days -- the 10.3.5 which comes with the iMac G5 may be modified for that hardware and therefore a different version than is otherwise available. I don't know, but I'm guessing it's a new intentional restriction rather than a technological one, either to force upgrades or to stay clear of licensing issues since each machine is bundled with different third-party applications.

Ivan.
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post #37 of 48 Old 01-17-2005, 05:30 AM
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Bah, you all are wannabees, I used to WORK for Apple....


;)

I have owned:
Apple IIe
IIsi
Performa 6300
G3/266 tower
G4/400 tower
G4DP1ghz tower (still got it, now in fileserver mode)
Powerbook G4/1.25ghz (main computer)
Powerbook G4/667 (son's computer)
Powerbook G3/500 (wife's computer)

I REALLY want a 20" G5 iMac
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post #38 of 48 Old 01-17-2005, 07:46 AM
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I used the Panther disks I ordered from the Apple Store to upgrade a 12" G4 PB, a G4 desktop and a G4 iMac.

Sad to say that I've only owned an Apple IIe and a G4 desktop. The other machines are owned by work, but at least I get to administer them.
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post #39 of 48 Old 01-17-2005, 08:18 AM
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I thought I'd join in the Apple geek party:

Apple ][, ][ plus, //e (rev a), Macintosh LC (with Apple //e compatibility card), LC 575, Duo 250 (later upgraded with 2300 logic board), Duo 2300, PowerBook 2400c (later upgraded to G3), iBook 500 MHz, iBook 600 MHz, PowerBook G4 867 MHz. Of these, the PowerBook G4, iBook 600 MHz, and PowerBook 2400c are still in regular use, and I still have all the portables.

And that's just the stuff I've actually used. I've also acquired these for one reason or another over the years: Apple //e rev B, Color Classic, PowerBook 100, PowerBook 140, Duo 230, Duo 280.
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post #40 of 48 Old 01-17-2005, 08:54 AM
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Here's mine and family list:

Apple IIc
Macintosh IIsi
Powerbook 160
Centris 660AV
Power Mac 8100
Power Computing PowerTower Pro 225
Power Mac G4 400 MHz AGP
Powerbook G3 500 MHz
Power Mac G4 Dual 800 MHz *
iPod 5 GB Rotating Scroll Wheel
iPod 30 GB 3rd Gen *
Powerbook G4 12" 1.33 MHz *

* Ones I currently own.
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post #41 of 48 Old 01-17-2005, 11:28 AM
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Since we're all Macheads here: does anyone know if elGato's eyehome will play RTV mpegs?
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post #42 of 48 Old 01-17-2005, 01:12 PM
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I guess that I should chime in. I've owned Macs since October of 1984, when I bought my 128 Mac, which was later upgraded to a Mac Plus, and is still in my garage somewhere. When I stopped using the Plus, I got an SE/30 in '87, which was finally taken out of service in Summer 2004 (it has a 200 Mb HD and an Ethernet card, and we were using it as a mailing list server running System 7.6.5 and LetterRip Pro; it was pumping out about 30,000 email messages a day at its peak). Since then, I've owned more Macs than I can remember, but including a Centris 650, a PowerComputing Power Tower Pro, a couple of UMAX clones, a G4 400, a G4 Dual Processor 1 GHZ, and the current desktop, a G5 Dual Processor 2.5 GHz. Oh, and the Blueberry iBook, the Ice iBook, and my current 12" G4 PowerBook.

I make my living writing books and articles, mostly about the Mac and Mac software. I'm up over two dozen books now, I think. I began writing for Macworld in 1987, and was a Contributing Editor there from 1990 through 2004. Check out www.negrino.com for the gory details.

We just got back from a week at Macworld Expo where we were speaking, and after cruising the show floor, my feet still hurt! :-)
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post #43 of 48 Old 01-17-2005, 02:00 PM - Thread Starter
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Tom, if my envy weren't already immense at your ability to make a living by writing about the Macintosh, the fact that you live in Healdsburg certainly pushes me over the proverbial edge.

I love the Russian River valley. My current obsession is Roshambo winery and their magnificent Zinfandels. I try to get up there once or twice a year.

I met Steve at NeXT Expo in 1994 at Moscone. Does that count?
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post #44 of 48 Old 01-17-2005, 09:18 PM
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Yes, it's great living here in Healdsburg. We're not big on Zins (though there's a terrific restaurant here called Zin!).

You've done one Mac thing better than I have; for some reason, I've never met Steve Jobs. But I was at an O'Reilly party last week with Woz, Andy Hertzfeld, Bill Atkinson, and virtually all of the rest of the original Mac team. It was the rollout party for Andy's new book, Revolution in the Valley, which we recommend highly. My wife, a total geek in her own right (and my sometimes co-author), got a bunch of the team to sign our copy of the book. Does that count? ;)
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post #45 of 48 Old 01-17-2005, 09:36 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally posted by Tom Negrino
You've done one Mac thing better than I have; for some reason, I've never met Steve Jobs. But I was at an O'Reilly party last week with Woz, Andy Hertzfeld, Bill Atkinson, and virtually all of the rest of the original Mac team. It was the rollout party for Andy's new book, Revolution in the Valley, which we recommend highly. My wife, a total geek in her own right (and my sometimes co-author), got a bunch of the team to sign our copy of the book. Does that count? ;) [/b]
You're huge. I was just happy to have all of the signatures molded into the plastic of my Mac Plus case. All facetiousness aside, it sounds like a very good life.

I am a former English major who got sidetracked into UNIX SysAdmin instead of pursuing technical writing. Now that I am out of the IT game by circumstance in the employment wasteland of Colorado, I am seeking a career transition. Might you have any advice for those interested in being paid to write and speak on technical topics? It seems like The Door is a tight fit in which to get one's foot.
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post #46 of 48 Old 01-20-2005, 01:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by BoulderGeek
I am a former English major who got sidetracked into UNIX SysAdmin instead of pursuing technical writing. Now that I am out of the IT game by circumstance in the employment wasteland of Colorado, I am seeking a career transition. Might you have any advice for those interested in being paid to write and speak on technical topics? It seems like The Door is a tight fit in which to get one's foot.
I gotta admit, it's been a tough few years in the writing and speaking biz since the dot-com crash. On the Computer Book Writers mailing list, people are bemoaning the lack of work all the time. Our income is certainly down from its peak, though we've been able to keep making a living as full-time writers thanks to the track record we've built over the past decade. But I wrote four books last year and five the year before, so I've had to keep cranking to make a living at it. Honestly, I would not suggest that someone new try to get into the writing business at this time unless you believe you have a compelling story to tell. For example, in your case, if you could write articles and/or books melding your expertise in the UNIX side with the Mac OS X experience, that would be a viable niche. But I'd have to point out that there are already a bunch of people mining that area. My friend Kirk McElhearn (now, I envy him; he lives in the French Alps!) has a book called The Mac OS X Command Line: Unix Under the Hood, and there are several books from O'Reilly, too.

You'll find it much easier to get a first book contract if you have a bunch of published magazine articles to point at. To get those, you have to pitch interesting and compelling ideas to magazine editors. There's no real magic to it; you have to be a good writer, who is easy to work with.

Technical writing (manuals, white papers, and the like) can be easier to get into, but that's an area where you really need a break to get started (e.g., you gotta know someone). I do very little of that stuff myself, so I don't have much advice there. Good luck! Sorry to be kind of a wet blanket. But we're in an industry slump.
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post #47 of 48 Old 01-20-2005, 06:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by BoulderGeek
You're huge. I was just happy to have all of the signatures molded into the plastic of my Mac Plus case. All facetiousness aside, it sounds like a very good life.

I am a former English major who got sidetracked into UNIX SysAdmin instead of pursuing technical writing. Now that I am out of the IT game by circumstance in the employment wasteland of Colorado, I am seeking a career transition. Might you have any advice for those interested in being paid to write and speak on technical topics? It seems like The Door is a tight fit in which to get one's foot.
There are often opportunities for someone with good technical and communications skills to become a trainer. That might provide interim employment and a work history that demonstrates that combination of abilities. With much more experience as a teacher/trainer than in computers, I got a temp assignment many years ago at a large insurance company teaching and designing courses from This Is A Mouse to intermediate and advanced Lotus 1-2-3. I know this is probably not as technical as you were thinking, but if in general you aim for a technical training role at a non-technical company, I think you'll find they will be desperate for people with your combination of skills instead of overwhelmed by recent MCSE grads.

Anyway, it's something to think about.

Psst, I got yer TV shows right here, buddy.
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post #48 of 48 Old 01-20-2005, 08:26 AM - Thread Starter
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Sorry to hijack this thread (but, hey, I started it; I guess I can hijack it).

Thanks for your informative posts, Tom and Max. I had already reached such concusions, but it was good to hear confirmations. I'm on e of those writers who has the perspective to discern quality, but not the temerity to create it. By which , I mean that I am a reasonable editor and critic, and I know that what I write is generally schlock.

The Alps of Provence are some of my favorite mountain places. I live at the base of the Rockies, so I don't have it too bad for a mountain lover. I'm hoping to spend the month of July in Annecy, brushing up on my French and cycling the mountains, especially during the Tour de France. I went over for a month of following the Tour in 2002.

OK, this is certainly a digression. Thanks to all who have posted, and I hope that our little sidetrack has been interesting! :-D
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