Removal of Black Bars - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 8 Old 10-01-2013, 12:05 PM - Thread Starter
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My brother has recently got me in to painting my screen and claims that by doing so and having the flexibility of that over a fixed size screen I can avoid the infamous black bars. The projector I will be using is the Panny ae8000 so it will have the ability to power lens shift and zoom between 16:9 and 2:35. Is there any truth to this?

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post #2 of 8 Old 10-01-2013, 12:11 PM
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Nope. Best way is A-lens. Next best thing is velvet panels to absorb the light. That is what I do I it works great.

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post #3 of 8 Old 10-01-2013, 04:57 PM - Thread Starter
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But why are there bars even if you can make the image exactly to match aspect ratio on an open painted wall?

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post #4 of 8 Old 10-01-2013, 08:38 PM - Thread Starter
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Anyone?

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post #5 of 8 Old 10-02-2013, 12:37 AM
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Because your projector will (likely) be 16:9 (1.78:1) aspect. When you display another aspect such as 2.35:1 there will be areas of the projector's panel that aren't lit up. However these areas will only be as dark as the projector can make them (with possibly bright areas on the 'active' part of the screen too, so it's not just a simple question of 'on/off' contrast).

Even the high end JVCs and Sony VW1000ES can't produce zero light output in those area, so you will see the 'black' bars (more like very dark grey). The only solution is masking with black velvet and/or using an anamorphic lens.

Using a borderless painted wall just allows you flexibility to project different aspects, but it's not for me (apart from that I have a window behind my drop down screen biggrin.gif) because I like having a crisp edge to the image that a screen border gives. Therefore I use a 2.35:1 screen and have side masks for 1.78/1.85:1.
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Zooming: Been there, done that, bought the lens...
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post #6 of 8 Old 10-02-2013, 02:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mijotter View Post

Anyone?

Films are shoot more or less in 1.85:1 and scope (which ranges from around 2.35:1 to 2.40:1). So if you have a scope 2.40:1 screen films shoot in 1.85:1 will have 'black bars' to either side of the image. If you have a 1.78:1 screen scope films will have black bars both above and below the image. No matter which screen shape you go for you will have black bars for some films. I would like to also point out most films are not shoot in scope, it is rather evenly split between scope and 1.85:1 at the moment and in the past films where shot in 1.37:1 (which makes a 1.78:1 screen a better choice if you watch many older films) so I would recommend spending some time deciding which one you prefer.
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post #7 of 8 Old 10-02-2013, 10:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FilmReverie View Post

Films are shoot more or less in 1.85:1 and scope (which ranges from around 2.35:1 to 2.40:1). So if you have a scope 2.40:1 screen films shoot in 1.85:1 will have 'black bars' to either side of the image. If you have a 1.78:1 screen scope films will have black bars both above and below the image. No matter which screen shape you go for you will have black bars for some films. I would like to also point out most films are not shoot in scope, it is rather evenly split between scope and 1.85:1 at the moment and in the past films where shot in 1.37:1 (which makes a 1.78:1 screen a better choice if you watch many older films) so I would recommend spending some time deciding which one you prefer.

While this is true - if you take into account ALL films produced in a given year, the number of films actually produced are split pretty evenly between the 1.85:1 (1.78:1) and 2.40:1 aspect ratios. However, more than 75% of the most popular films since the mid-1950s have been shot at 2.40:1. This is true right up until today. Look at the 100 top grossing movies of all time - 76 are 2.40:1.

Dave Carty took a look at the top 10 grossing movies of each of the past three years and nearly all of them are 2.35:1. Interestingly, all 10 of the top grossing movies of 2011 are 2.35:1.

So, here is my suggestion. Take a look at your personal movie collection (or make a list of your favorite films) and see what aspect ratio they are. Whenever I have had anyone do this the ratio of 2.40:1 to other aspect ratios has been about 2 to 1 in favor of Scope. Of course, if your tastes run toward classic cinema or art films, you may end up with the opposite ratio.

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post #8 of 8 Old 10-02-2013, 03:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Schuermann View Post

While this is true - if you take into account ALL films produced in a given year, the number of films actually produced are split pretty evenly between the 1.85:1 (1.78:1) and 2.40:1 aspect ratios. However, more than 75% of the most popular films since the mid-1950s have been shot at 2.40:1. This is true right up until today. Look at the 100 top grossing movies of all time - 76 are 2.40:1.

Dave Carty took a look at the top 10 grossing movies of each of the past three years and nearly all of them are 2.35:1. Interestingly, all 10 of the top grossing movies of 2011 are 2.35:1.

So, here is my suggestion. Take a look at your personal movie collection (or make a list of your favorite films) and see what aspect ratio they are. Whenever I have had anyone do this the ratio of 2.40:1 to other aspect ratios has been about 2 to 1 in favor of Scope. Of course, if your tastes run toward classic cinema or art films, you may end up with the opposite ratio.

I agree with this. I went 1.78:1 as for me is the best fit as I watch a number of older films shoot in 1.37:1 along with many newer films which from my experience tend to be rather evenly split. On top of that in 3d 1.78:1 seems to provide the best results and in 3d a little more screen size helps tremendously (and the success of a film only matters to me in rare circumstances [for example Hugo not doing very well at the box office still annoys me especially when numerous other terrible films do huge business] or when I want a sequel).

If however you tend to watch more recent big budget films more then anything else then 2.35:1 is probably the way I would recommend going. But John Schuermann unsurprisingly nailed it, you really have to look at the content you watch and decide what will work best for you (and of course your room).
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