What are the different ways to stretch 16:9 content to fill a 2.35 screen? - Page 3 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #61 of 95 Old 06-12-2017, 10:46 AM
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Here's a critical point that Bud is either unable to comprehend or simply refuses to acknowledge: A movie like Pacific Rim was not photographed with IMAX cameras, nor was it composed specially for IMAX. Bud assumes that because it's a movie about giant robots and it played in IMAX theaters, it must have been specially made with IMAX in mind. It was not.

Look at any dialogue scene involving the human characters in that movie. They're composed just the same as any non-IMAX 1.85:1 movie, with medium shots and close-ups that become too uncomfortably huge when viewed at IMAX levels of immersion. Audiences now need to scan their eyes up and down to take in both a character's eyes and mouth when they speak. This has the same effect as shooting a simple dialogue scene entirely in extreme close-ups. It makes viewers uncomfortable.

A movie legitimately composed for IMAX would move the actors further back away from the camera and surround them with a lot of unessential dead space on all sides, which falls outside the viewers' peripheral vision. But directors don't shoot movies that way, because it looks terrible on all non-IMAX screens. Therefore, they shoot the movie for how the vast majority of the audience will see it, either in theaters or on home video, and let the chips fall where they may when it comes to IMAX.

This is also one of the main reasons why digital IMAX theaters (the so-called "LIEMAX") are smaller than the old 15/70 film IMAX screens. Many LIEMAX screens are barely any larger at all than a typical multiplex screen. When the company decided to focus its efforts on Hollywood movies rather than nature documentaries, it had to reduce its screen size so those movies would be more watchable.

In movies that use a variable aspect ratio, such as The Dark Knight, only the scenes actually shot with IMAX cameras (typically the non-dialogue action scenes) are composed for IMAX. The rest of the film is composed by the same rules as any other scope movie. When the IMAX scenes come up, the top and bottom of the frame expand mostly (or entirely) with unessential padding that can be easily cropped off for the scope prints.

The only movies genuinely made for a 100% IMAX experience are the nature documentaries shot entirely with IMAX cameras.

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post #62 of 95 Old 06-12-2017, 11:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post
Here's a critical point that Bud is either unable to comprehend or simply refuses to acknowledge: A movie like Pacific Rim was not photographed with IMAX cameras, nor was it composed specially for IMAX. Bud assumes that because it's a movie about giant robots and it played in IMAX theaters, it must have been specially made with IMAX in mind. It was not.

Look at any dialogue scene involving the human characters in that movie. They're composed just the same as any non-IMAX 1.85:1 movie, with medium shots and close-ups that become too uncomfortably huge when viewed at IMAX levels of immersion. Audiences now need to scan their eyes up and down to take in both a character's eyes and mouth when they speak. This has the same effect as shooting a simple dialogue scene entirely in extreme close-ups. It makes viewers uncomfortable.

A movie legitimately composed for IMAX would move the actors further back away from the camera and surround them with a lot of unessential dead space on all sides, which falls outside the viewers' peripheral vision. But directors don't shoot movies that way, because it looks terrible on all non-IMAX screens. Therefore, they shoot the movie for how the vast majority of the audience will see it, either in theaters or on home video, and let the chips fall where they may when it comes to IMAX.

This is also one of the main reasons why digital IMAX theaters (the so-called "LIEMAX") are smaller than the old 15/70 film IMAX screens. Many LIEMAX screens are barely any larger at all than a typical multiplex screen. When the company decided to focus its efforts on Hollywood movies rather than nature documentaries, it had to reduce its screen size so those movies would be more watchable.

In movies that use a variable aspect ratio, such as The Dark Knight, only the scenes actually shot with IMAX cameras (typically the non-dialogue action scenes) are composed for IMAX. The rest of the film is composed by the same rules as any other scope movie. When the IMAX scenes come up, the top and bottom of the frame expand mostly (or entirely) with unessential padding that can be easily cropped off for the scope prints.

The only movies genuinely made for a 100% IMAX experience are the nature documentaries shot entirely with IMAX cameras.

My mention of Pacific Rim was in agreement with Craig Peer’s liking to watch that movie more immersive on his somewhat CIA two screen setup. I also mentioned Avatar that in terms of composition is the basic Imax reproduction on BD.

I agree 100% with your critical point that I can easily comprehend that movies are directed in such a way based around how they are to play. A movie like Sully is a great example of how Eastwood and the studio filmed and framed for both Imax and scope and then made the call it went out as scope on BD. I would have liked the Imax version and most people watching it letterboxed on flat screen TV’s my guess would like something rather than nothing in the black bars. But they did put it out as scope and cut the Imax off as crazy as it sounds because the number of people with CIH projection theaters is not at all their bread and butter.

Now let’s talk about soap operas. My god yes I don’t want them Imax-ed. How about football or auto racing or basketball or hockey. Hmm maybe those cars are pretty small and half the screen is graphics anyway. How about the Planet Earth series. I don’t think Imax had a hand in it but they could have based around their Imax versions of quite similar subject matter and framing.

Back to Pacific Rim. Some of it is too intense to be Imax like, I’m sure. But then again a good deal of it for the right viewer that wants full workout of watching the action like you were part of it with the subs cranked up, might just be their thing any given day. Would I show a 90 year old granny that presentation maybe not but I know some 12 year old kids that would be all in for the CIA version.

That is the “Personal” aspect of a personal home theater.


I do get it. I wonder if you get that some people some time want to dive in and some people sit on the side of the pool and watch.

Bud
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post #63 of 95 Old 06-12-2017, 12:02 PM
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How about blah blah blah blah blah blah blah...

Pacific Rim follows the same fundamental rules of composition as any soap opera. A medium shot shows an actor's head and part of their chest.



Blow that up to IMAX size and this is what viewers wind up looking at, with everything else spilling out beyond their peripheral vision.



Not a fun way to watch a movie, IMO. You are of course free to do whatever you want.
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post #64 of 95 Old 06-12-2017, 02:51 PM
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How about blah blah blah blah blah blah blah...

Pacific Rim follows the same fundamental rules of composition as any soap opera. A medium shot shows an actor's head and part of their chest.



Blow that up to IMAX size and this is what viewers wind up looking at, with everything else spilling out beyond their peripheral vision.



Not a fun way to watch a movie, IMO. You are of course free to do whatever you want.


Josh, Josh, Josh

I have told you a hundred million times not to exaggerate. Your first image if it was being viewed 2X screen height distance then your second photo is at a scale 4 times closer or .5X screen height. That is not at all the ratio between flat and Imax and in the case of Craig Peer watching it as CIA and that is fairly close to how I would view it myself using my PIA. The level of immersion is a lot less than what you show in the two pics.

If someone is really interested in the difference it is easy to do. Go to IMDb I will even provide a link to the movie Trailer 2 minutes 31 seconds long.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1663662/

Click on the link and then open it to full screen size. Now measure the height of your monitor. Mine is 10 inches so I watched it from 20inches away. 2X screen height. That would be a quite immersive viewing distance for most people viewing CIH. The majority of people would rather be around 2.5X screen height or 25 inches away. Try both and find what would suit you for both scope and flat in terms of height. I wont do the math but be my guest to do it if you want to be very accurate. The difference between 20” and 25” in terms of immersion is more what we are talking about with a 10” high monitor. What Josh was showing was more like watching it from 25” and then moving up to 6”.
And of course that would be uncomfortable. Watch the trailer both ways and it has a good cross section of the type of overall things that happen in the movie. The movie is not made up of a bunch of head and shoulder shots of people talking but there are a few as Josh showed us.

I often when adjusting immersion make even more subtle changes than this example.

Keep in mind if you take this immersion test on your monitor and you wear reading glasses you might have a focus issue with 2X SH as you don’t normally view your screen that close. It will give you a feel for immersion and if anything on a bigger scale with a projector it is even more pleasant.


Also if you the OP are in the planning stages of a home theater most people doing CIH pick a conservative distance for seating based around screen height. You may really like 2X SH but you might want to pick 2.5X SH as you want all your guests to enjoy and a 2x person wont be annoyed at 2.5X but a 2.5X person might say 2X is too large. With 2 screens as Craig uses or doing a PIA zoom as I do you get the best of both worlds.

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post #65 of 95 Old 06-12-2017, 05:39 PM
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There is a reason why 15 degrees works for maximum screen size in a given room. Because when you sit at 2x the image height, other well known and documented specs also fall into place.

Sound is 50% of the experience, and the ITU-R just so happens to gel really well with a room designed this way. And you have room behind the seats for back surrounds.

I've been doing these room designs in a 3D model program for a while now and everytime I do one, I find it works.

Then, and this bake your noodle, comes the specs by projector manufactures which also happen to fall into alignment here, especially the fine alignment when using an anamorphic lens.

My recommendation for you and single row of seats is to sit 2x the image height for both 2D and 3D. In your case, chose the maximum image height for your CIA set up.

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post #66 of 95 Old 06-13-2017, 04:14 AM
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There is a reason why 15 degrees works for maximum screen size in a given room. Because when you sit at 2x the image height, other well known and documented specs also fall into place.

Sound is 50% of the experience, and the ITU-R just so happens to gel really well with a room designed this way. And you have room behind the seats for back surrounds.

I've been doing these room designs in a 3D model program for a while now and everytime I do one, I find it works.

Then, and this bake your noodle, comes the specs by projector manufactures which also happen to fall into alignment here, especially the fine alignment when using an anamorphic lens.

My recommendation for you and single row of seats is to sit 2x the image height for both 2D and 3D. In your case, chose the maximum image height for your CIA set up.
That’s what I have done and it would be great if everyone had the luxury of designing a home theater from scratch in new construction. Sure I see your point a wealthy person comes in and says I’m building a new house size and money are no object I want the best and I want a room that I can entertain up to 16 people in and I want to give them the movie experience of a lifetime. Design me a room.

That is a very tiny percentage of an even smaller group of people doing front projection home theater. Most are trying to work front projection into an existing living room without the wife getting too upset. Or using a spare bedroom as a theater with the seating slammed against one wall and the screen on the other. Then there are the basement and garage guys low ceilings and shooting under air ducts etc.

Realistically the way to make a small room feel large and a way to adjust immersion as if you had a larger room is with the zoom control on your projector. I will agree in a small room use 2X SH or maybe even less to select screen height not image height. With an adequate screen size, in my case Imax immersion size 16:9, I can then with zoom have any lesser size or level of immersion I or my guests like. Seeing as how we don’t change our seating distance for immersion the sound system also doesn’t move and getting it as good as it can be for a given room always remains constant regardless of the image size we watch.

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post #67 of 95 Old 06-13-2017, 05:48 AM
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That’s what I have done and it would be great if everyone had the luxury of designing a home theater from scratch in new construction. Sure I see your point a wealthy person comes in and says I’m building a new house size and money are no object I want the best and I want a room that I can entertain up to 16 people in and I want to give them the movie experience of a lifetime. Design me a room.
Apart from my own room, I've never had a truly "blank canvas". And apart from the one room with the 2m tall screen, the owners of these cinemas have not been "wealthy", rather normal people with a real budgets wanting the best they can get for their dollar. Even the 2m screen room was already partially done (his riser and seating) which was not positioned in the best place it could have been. Unfortunately, I was brought in to that project to fix another's "mess". With 15 thousand already spend on the carpet alone, he was not prepared to rip it up for my recommendations of moving it all forward a meter.

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That is a very tiny percentage of an even smaller group of people doing front projection home theater. Most are trying to work front projection into an existing living room without the wife getting too upset. Or using a spare bedroom as a theater with the seating slammed against one wall and the screen on the other. Then there are the basement and garage guys low ceilings and shooting under air ducts etc.
I guess I fit in to this (last part) category. I built my room as a room inside a room (inside a garage) and had to keep the ceiling under the panel door. So I do have a low ceiling and even if I didn't, I still would go Scope from the very nature of how it looks when set up correctly. Even though D-Cinema does not use the anamorphic lens anymore, there are literally tens of 1000's of films pre-digital that did and I am all about "preserving the art. That is why I got into anamorphics in the first place. Why I have an AT screen and why I even have a dedicated room. I started planning this in the 1990s. I am certainly not prepared to give that up now. In truth, if DVD had been "full frame" and not OAR, I'd probably be content with 16:9. As it turns out, I actually understand CinemaScope and hate black bars. My story goes back to Return Of The Jedi in 1983.

Front projection is a niche market on its own (in this country anyway). Ever since the stunt of Jerry Harvey (of Harvey Norman fame) decided open plan show rooms were the better than closed in demo rooms, front projection has struggled to the point where it faces the very real threat of extinction soon (at retail anyway). No projector can compete for brightness under shop lights, especially when placed next to larger screen (85" now) LCDs and O-Led TVs. People want bright and colourful images. They won't see them when a projector displayed that way.

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Realistically the way to make a small room feel large and a way to adjust immersion as if you had a larger room is with the zoom control on your projector. I will agree in a small room use 2X SH or maybe even less to select screen height not image height. With an adequate screen size, in my case Imax immersion size 16:9, I can then with zoom have any lesser size or level of immersion I or my guests like. Seeing as how we don’t change our seating distance for immersion the sound system also doesn’t move and getting it as good as it can be for a given room always remains constant regardless of the image size we watch.
If you want to make a small room "feel" bigger, you max out the screen size and you paint the walls and the ceiling the same (dark) colour. Reflected light off the screen gives a very cool optical illusion.

I used to sit back at about 3x the image height until the day I brought home a 3D projector to test. Out of pure frustration of how small we (I) perceive deep 3D images, I jumped into the front row and I found it much better. I tested 2D in the same place and decided this works for me. If I demo my room, I make them sit in the front row. No ones ever been sick or complained.

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post #68 of 95 Old 06-18-2017, 06:13 AM
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so as someone who is a first time projector owner, JVC x570r ( with scope screen). I came across my first variable aspect ratio movie last night-star trek into darkness. So obviously when watching scope movies, I set lens memory to zoom and then I have another setting for 16.9 material. but I guess the only option when watching a scope movie like this is to just let the Imax scenes spill out of the screen? found it took away from enjoying any Imax scenes.
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post #69 of 95 Old 06-18-2017, 07:23 AM
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so as someone who is a first time projector owner, JVC x570r ( with scope screen). I came across my first variable aspect ratio movie last night-star trek into darkness. So obviously when watching scope movies, I set lens memory to zoom and then I have another setting for 16.9 material. but I guess the only option when watching a scope movie like this is to just let the Imax scenes spill out of the screen? found it took away from enjoying any Imax scenes.
I agree. It all boils down to if a person has the height to do an Imax size screen and do you watch enough of these movies to make it worth wile doing so.

We all watch different stuff on our projectors and without an A-lens you have a 16:9 projector all the time and you are just tricking it into thinking it is a scope with the zoom function.

I think it takes away from the few movies made that way. Will the trend continue and more and more movies will do this no one knows except the directors. If it was just those few movies and I didn’t find some non movie content Imax like, I would just stick with a scope screen most likely. Having a Imax screen in no way stops you from viewing CIH though.

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post #70 of 95 Old 06-18-2017, 03:58 PM
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so as someone who is a first time projector owner, JVC x570r ( with scope screen). I came across my first variable aspect ratio movie last night-star trek into darkness. So obviously when watching scope movies, I set lens memory to zoom and then I have another setting for 16.9 material. but I guess the only option when watching a scope movie like this is to just let the Imax scenes spill out of the screen? found it took away from enjoying any Imax scenes.
About 12 films exist in this format. If we had a few hundred done this way, then sure CIH+IMAX would be the way to go.

These are what I would find extremely frustrating with the zoom method. There are blanking bars that can be used to clip off the those parts when zoomed out. I'd suggest setting those up.

Because I use an A-Lens and Scale for CIH, I would not have even been aware of the IMAX parts during my screening.

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Having a Imax screen in no way stops you from viewing CIH though.
Only if you have removeable masks in place. Otherwize projecting CIH onto a giant 16:9 screen is same as watching the letter box on a giant 16:9 screen.

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post #71 of 95 Old 06-19-2017, 05:01 AM
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[QUOTE=CAVX;53729913]About 12 films exist in this format. If we had a few hundred done this way, then sure CIH+IMAX would be the way to go.

These are what I would find extremely frustrating with the zoom method. There are blanking bars that can be used to clip off the those parts when zoomed out. I'd suggest setting those up.

Because I use an A-Lens and Scale for CIH, I would not have even been aware of the IMAX parts during my screening.

so you are saying "blanking bars" or some sort of masking panel is the only way then. my screen is pretty close to the ceiling so the only option would be to put some velvet I guess on the ceiling over the screen? Don't think I wan t to do that. I guess I'll just have to let it spill all over the place until the movie goes back to its original aspect ratio. Probably will avoid buying these movies in the future then. Or just watch them on the TV then.

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post #72 of 95 Old 06-19-2017, 05:10 AM
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so you are saying "blanking bars" or some sort of masking angels is the only way then. my screen is pretty close to the ceiling so the only option would be to put some velvet I guess on the ceiling over the screen? Don't think I wan t to do that. I guess I'll just have to let it spill all over the place until the movie goes back to its original aspect ratio. Probably will avoid buying these movies in the future then. Or just watch them on the TV then.
The big question is - how do you know if these films are shot as CinemaScope or "Scope on flat" (its true name BTW, not CIH+IMAX, that was the name I gave it back in 2008). Technically, all letter boxed films on video are "Scope on flat". The challenge now is how to deal with the action that extends onto the black bars.

Once the blanking is set up, if you play one such film you won't see these supposed "IMAX" portions because the pixels that would normally display these are turned off. The blacks are so good on these machines that you may not need to add anything around the screen.

JVC projectors employ DiLA (Digital Light Amplifier) technology which, due to the "reflective" nature, is able to produce very deep blacks, probably the deepest blacks of any digital projector. The blanking bars turn off the pixels that would otherwise be wasted on black bars, and these can be custom set for your system.

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post #73 of 95 Old 06-19-2017, 05:31 AM
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The big question is - how do you know if these films are shot as CinemaScope or "Scope on flat" (its true name BTW, not CIH+IMAX, that was the name I gave it back in 2008). Technically, all letter boxed films on video are "Scope on flat". The challenge now is how to deal with the action that extends onto the black bars.

Once the blanking is set up, if you play one such film you won't see these supposed "IMAX" portions because the pixels that would normally display these are turned off. The blacks are so good on these machines that you may not need to add anything around the screen.

JVC projectors employ DiLA (Digital Light Amplifier) technology which, due to the "reflective" nature, is able to produce very deep blacks, probably the deepest blacks of any digital projector. The blanking bars turn off the pixels that would otherwise be wasted on black bars, and these can be custom set for your system.
going to have to excuse my ignorance. not really sure what you mean by "blanking". do you mean masking? I do have vertical masking set up for 16.9 movies. but there is no way to do it horizontally ( top and bottom of screen). cabinet sits at the bottom and top is almost at ceiling. Or am I misunderstanding?
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post #74 of 95 Old 06-19-2017, 06:30 AM
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going to have to excuse my ignorance. not really sure what you mean by "blanking". do you mean masking? I do have vertical masking set up for 16.9 movies. but there is no way to do it horizontally ( top and bottom of screen). cabinet sits at the bottom and top is almost at ceiling. Or am I misunderstanding?
It's electronic blanking in the projector, it blanks out the area covered by the black bars, so that any content that is there, isn't shown. Black is still projected though, so unmasked (eg on a 16:9 screen) it wouldn't actually be black, but it's a non-issue zoomed on a scope screen.
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It's electronic blanking in the projector, it blanks out the area covered by the black bars, so that any content that is there, isn't shown. Black is still projected though, so unmasked (eg on a 16:9 screen) it wouldn't actually be black, but it's a non-issue zoomed on a scope screen.
learning more every day I guess. thanks. will have to do some homework try to figure this out on my projector.
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post #76 of 95 Old 06-19-2017, 07:23 AM
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learning more every day I guess. thanks. will have to do some homework try to figure this out on my projector.
You could always watch those movies using the “Flat 16:9” mode of your projector. Watch them as if they were a non-scope movie.

That way you will be able to see the movie the way the director intended it and not have to use the blanking mode if your projector has something like that or buy another piece of equipment to do the blanking.

It sounds like your room is height limited.

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That way you will be able to see the movie the way the director intended it and not have to use the blanking mode if your projector has something like that or buy another piece of equipment to do the blanking.
I wouldn't put it that way, none of the movies we're talking about were shown as 16:9 in scope cinemas. In general, the way the "director intended" was to be as large as possible, and the variable AR films were only shown as such on the gigantic IMAX screens. Showing something like TDK, shrunk down to fit the 16:9 portion of a scope screen isn't really in line with the "as large as possible" intent.
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so as someone who is a first time projector owner, JVC x570r ( with scope screen). I came across my first variable aspect ratio movie last night-star trek into darkness. So obviously when watching scope movies, I set lens memory to zoom and then I have another setting for 16.9 material. but I guess the only option when watching a scope movie like this is to just let the Imax scenes spill out of the screen? found it took away from enjoying any Imax scenes.
There's a very simple fix for Star Trek into Darkness: Watch any Blu-ray edition of the film except the "Compendium" box set version. Only the Compendium release is variable ratio. The variable ratio version of that movie is not scope-safe. During the taller IMAX footage, on-screen text has been repositioned so that it's placed above and below the 2.35:1 safe area. If you use electronic blanking to mask off the top and bottom of the image, text will be cut off.

All other Blu-ray editions of the movie are CIH 2.35:1. Amazon is selling the standard release for $9.99 currently.

https://www.amazon.com/Star-Trek-Dar.../dp/B00AZMFK3K

Marketplace sellers are offering used copies for as little as $1.51.

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post #79 of 95 Old 06-19-2017, 08:44 AM
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I wouldn't put it that way, none of the movies we're talking about were shown as 16:9 in scope cinemas. In general, the way the "director intended" was to be as large as possible, and the variable AR films were only shown as such on the gigantic IMAX screens. Showing something like TDK, shrunk down to fit the 16:9 portion of a scope screen isn't really in line with the "as large as possible" intent.
If that was the case no one should ever watch any scope movie at home on their TV.

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post #80 of 95 Old 06-19-2017, 08:48 AM
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There's a very simple fix for Star Trek into Darkness: Watch any Blu-ray edition of the film except the "Compendium" box set version. Only the Compendium release is variable ratio. The variable ratio version of that movie is not scope-safe. During the taller IMAX footage, on-screen text has been repositioned so that it's placed above and below the 2.35:1 safe area. If you use electronic blanking to mask off the top and bottom of the image, text will be cut off.

All other Blu-ray editions of the movie are CIH 2.35:1. Amazon is selling the standard release for $9.99 currently.

https://www.amazon.com/Star-Trek-Dar.../dp/B00AZMFK3K

Marketplace sellers are offering used copies for as little as $1.51.
it is actually the 4K HD blu-ray with the atmos soundtrack that i have. have the other two in the series in 4k too. Both those looked and sounded great. I guess my options are watch in 16.9 mode or figure out the electronic blanking on the projector to see if I like that. but like you said. sounds like I will be missing a lot of info if I go that route.
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post #81 of 95 Old 06-19-2017, 09:11 AM
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it is actually the 4K HD blu-ray with the atmos soundtrack that i have.
I wasn't aware that one was variable ratio as well. I will update this in the Variable Aspect Ratio Movies thread. Thanks.
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post #82 of 95 Old 06-19-2017, 09:24 AM
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I wasn't aware that one was variable ratio as well. I will update this in the Variable Aspect Ratio Movies thread. Thanks.
I didn't remember it being that way either when I watched it. Maybe I just didn't notice.
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post #83 of 95 Old 06-19-2017, 10:08 AM
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I didn't remember it being that way either when I watched it. Maybe I just didn't notice.
I found a review that confirmed it.

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post #84 of 95 Old 06-19-2017, 10:21 AM
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I guess my options are watch in 16.9 mode or figure out the electronic blanking on the projector to see if I like that. but like you said. sounds like I will be missing a lot of info if I go that route.
If your projector has electronic blanking, that's probably your best option (if imperfect in this case). The movie only has a couple of instances of on-screen text that will get chopped off. The rest of the IMAX shots are safe to blank.



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http://bluray.highdefdigest.com/1279...ompendium.html

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post #85 of 95 Old 06-20-2017, 03:32 AM
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[QUOTE=Josh Z;53741497]If your projector has electronic blanking, that's probably your best option (if imperfect in this case). The movie only has a couple of instances of on-screen text that will get chopped off. The rest of the IMAX shots are safe to blank.

tried out the masking feature last night. worked great. exactly what i was looking for. I was able to enjoy the movie experience with no distractions. thanks everyone for your help in this. even though its an option I may not use much- its still a very useful one to know.
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post #86 of 95 Old 06-21-2017, 01:51 AM
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@thetman , once set does it remain for all inputs or modes? Or can you custom set it like you can a custom gamma curve?

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post #87 of 95 Old 06-21-2017, 03:54 AM
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@thetman , once set does it remain for all inputs or modes? Or can you custom set it like you can a custom gamma curve?
You can set it to the amount you want. starts at zero and you just keep pressing until you see where the image stops over-spilling from the screen. honestly I haven't gone back and used the projector since I did it. but I know in the menu masking has the option of being off or using several user settings you set up. I was in user 1 ( or mode 1- forget the actual naming). I am assuming when I power back on it will be still in that mode. I will check tonight to see or maybe someone could answer for me. I know before I did it the setting was set to off.
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post #88 of 95 Old 06-21-2017, 04:04 AM
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Yeah, cool.

That and the auto zoom suddenly presents a heap of help to the whole CIH community, even those of use with an A-Lens.

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post #89 of 95 Old 06-21-2017, 07:31 AM
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The auto features are great and I wish I had many of them. But I don’t.

On the other hand for people reading on limited budgets or with projectors that don’t have the bells and whistles there is some pleasure I get from doing a manual setup for a special showing of a movie. My projector doesn’t have the zoom needed to do the zoom method or the presets. I built my own slide that allows me to do zoom by moving the projector. I do my focus by hand and I adjust my 4way masking by hand along with my homemade method of dropping the image. I have pland for making my slide rail angled down so my zoom and shift go together but I haven’t built that yet.

It is kind of fun I feel like a 1950’s projectionist tweaking his presentation before a showing and it takes only 5 minutes. The exercise won’t hurt me after watching a movie for 2 hours. I try and pool similar AR showing together also.

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post #90 of 95 Old 06-21-2017, 08:07 AM
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It is kind of fun I feel like a 1950’s projectionist tweaking his presentation before a showing and it takes only 5 minutes. The exercise won’t hurt me after watching a movie for 2 hours. I try and pool similar AR showing together also.

My father was a projectionist in the late 1940s (first job after getting out of the Navy). Hopefully you don't have to keep an eye out for the cue mark and change reels every 15 to 20 minutes.

My very humble setup:
Spoiler!
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