Streaming & On-Demand Options for 2.35:1 Home Theater - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 7 Old 06-21-2014, 07:29 AM - Thread Starter
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Streaming & On-Demand Options for 2.35:1 Home Theater

I often forgo watching "free" movies from all the U-verse premium channels I have in my plan in favor of watching them on Blu-Ray, primarily to enjoy the full content of the original aspect ratio (not applicable for OAR of 1.85:1 or similar, of course). After all, that's why I've invested in building a 2.4:1 setup in my theater.

My experience is that premium and on-demand content is hit-and-miss on preserving the OAR - and usually miss. I'm also presuming they don't deliver 1080p and DTS-HD Master Audio or Dolby TrueHD and 7.1 in certain titles as available on Blu-Ray. Am I mistaken or are there options out there that I'm not aware of?
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post #2 of 7 Old 06-23-2014, 05:59 AM
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I think Netflix/Amazon/Vudu are all OAR, but I'm pretty sure you're right that Blu-ray is still the only game in town for lossless audio.

See what an anamorphoscopic lens can do, see movies the way they were meant to be seen
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post #3 of 7 Old 06-27-2014, 06:57 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by stanger89 View Post
I think Netflix/Amazon/Vudu are all OAR, but I'm pretty sure you're right that Blu-ray is still the only game in town for lossless audio.
Can anyone confirm if Netflix delivers OAR ad 1080p? Their website if awful as far as technical specifications go.
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post #4 of 7 Old 06-27-2014, 07:03 AM
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If you want quality, Netflix isn't really the way to go. I mean as far as I'm concerned it's pretty good, but that's for what it is, which is streaming and I just don't set my expectations too high for that.

As for 1080p, that's a relatively meaningless metric, you can encode something at 1080p in such a way that it looks worse than 480p, or it can look great.

OAR? I've seen scope content on Netflix streaming, but most of what I stream from Netflix is TV so it's not really an issue for me.

See what an anamorphoscopic lens can do, see movies the way they were meant to be seen
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post #5 of 7 Old 07-01-2014, 01:14 AM
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Originally Posted by helmsman View Post
Can anyone confirm if Netflix delivers OAR ad 1080p? Their website if awful as far as technical specifications go.
Netflix is subject to what the studios (or distributors) provide, and even though Netflix generally wants OAR, they don't always get OAR. But for a given title, the same source will be encoded for all the streams. Most modern streaming devices use one or another variant of what Netflix calls "adaptive streams", allowing the device to switch from one resolution to another under varying throughputs, which requires the whole range of resolutions to have the same aspect ratio (otherwise the picture may be changing shape every 10 seconds), from about 240p through 1080p and through "SuperHD".

Back during the first few years that Netflix was streaming, it seemed that pan-and-scan wasn't that unusual, so if there are still older streams around, they may still be pan-and-scan.

It seems that the best chance of seeing OAR in the consumer marketplace is to try to get the Blu-ray, if possible. And, especially for action, that has the least digitizing artifacts. But, second to Blu-ray, it seems that streaming would be second choice for trying to get OAR, and I consider it chance alone when I get a DVD from Netflix and it turns out to be OAR (except, of course, for material originally formatted for SD TV or HD TV); Netflix seems to still have a lot of DVDs that were mastered back when the consumer marketplace was void of HDTVs.

Nonetheless, where picture matters, or where there are action scenes, I'll generally try to get the Blu-ray as first choice, DVD as second choice (still far fewer digital artifacts than streaming), Netflix streaming as my third choice, and my Netflix plan includes all three options, though I am slowly building up a private library of discs. But where picture doesn't matter that much, I may end up streaming the title just out of convenience.
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My very humble setup:
Man Cave:Vizio E500i-A1 "Smart TV" (50-in 1080p 120Hz LED/LCD, has Netflix app.), Blu-ray players (Sony BDP-S3100, old LG BD390), Roku (the original model: N1000), PC (Windows 7), Comcast Internet (25Mbps/5Mbps).
Bedroom:LG 32LV3400-UA TV (32-in 768p 60Hz LED/LCD), HD DVR (Motorola RNG200N), Xfinity Comcast cable (Digital Starter Package), DVD/VHS player.
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post #6 of 7 Old 07-06-2014, 06:58 PM
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It depends on your Internet provider

ATT U-verse uses VDSL2 broadband. Not the fastest broadband technology on the planet. With anything "broadband" you need to test your own individual download speed (with speedtest, etc) during the hours that you watch movies.

When Netflix decides what to send you it looks at the peak bit rate and the sustained bit rate.

I have very good bit rates at home during my work day, but starting at 5 PM it drops off and by 8 PM it's frustrating. Netflix movies on my 720P 50" plasma are still OK, but on the 2.35:1 big screen I only use Netflix's snail mail disk service.
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post #7 of 7 Old 07-13-2014, 07:01 PM
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me too,my Netflix plan includes all three options, though I am slowly building up a private library of discs. But where picture doesn't matter that much, I may end up streaming the title just out of convenience.[IMG]http://*******/AN0mnq[/IMG]thank you
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