Display Calibration: Root Fundamentals - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 80 Old 04-21-2008, 08:30 PM - Thread Starter
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The foundational and primary goal of display calibration is image fidelity (faithfulness to the original program). Video is a mass communication medium. The objective of any communication medium is to convey an original message as accurately and completely as possible. Any alteration of the message becomes a distortion of the original intent. Example: the parlor game where a circle of people pass a whispered message, delivered to the first person in the circle, then whispered to the next, on around the circle, and finally the last person announces what he thinks the message was. Invariably, each person alters the message slightly until the final recipient announces a garbled version that typically bears little resemblance to the original.

The video industry is governed and guided by standards, engineering guidelines, and recommended practices, defined by organizations such as: the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE), the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC), etc. These standards and practices are intended to encourage and preserve: signal, equipment, and program accuracy, integrity, unity, consistency, and repeatability, all along the chain from program production, through post-production, to exhibition/broadcast/tape/DVD/etc., and finally to the audience (consumer). If at any step along this path, industry standards are deviated from, the program can become diSt0rtEddd.

Video displays used by program professionals are designed, manufactured and calibrated to tightly adhere to industry standards. They include in their design certain features that allow technicians to adjust them periodically (sometimes each day), using reference test signals, to insure picture accuracy. Such professional video monitors cost up to tens of thousands of dollars for relatively small sized screens. They must perform reliably for years, sometimes operating around the clock.

Consumer displays typically are designed, manufactured and adjusted at the factory to appeal to focus groups and the uninformed masses. Few consumers have ever seen a reference picture displayed on a calibrated broadcast or post-production monitor. Therefore, consumers are left to guess what their TV picture is supposed to look like.

Consumer TVs and projectors cost far less than professional displays. Manufacturers often cut corners to reduce costs in order to compete with one another in the marketplace. They also adjust their products at the factory to attract attention to their TVs on a show floor alongside samples of their competitors' wares. This could be compared to straining one's voice in a shouting match. Such over-accentuated pictures may dazzle the casual shopper but are not representative of correct pictures for regular viewing in the home. Video industry standards and practices are regularly deviated from and ignored by manufacturers. Fortunately, most consumer displays include adjustment features that allow someone who knows what they're doing to make the picture behave closer to proper standards.

Display calibration is simply making adjustments to the video device in order to achieve a more accurate picture. The artists who produce video programs want their intended audience to see what they saw on their calibrated professional monitors. Uncalibrated consumer displays cannot convey faithfully what the program originator intended. A distorted picture is the result. Artistic integrity is lost. Distortion reduces the value of any program and prevents the owner of the equipment from fully enjoying the capabilities of the display device they have purchased. The picture may be "watchable" and even enjoyable to an individual viewer- up to a point. Most consumers are never aware just how much better their programs can look if they were able to experience the picture the originator of the program envisioned.

Some consumers may actually prefer a distorted picture. For more discriminating viewers, there are resources available that help bring correct imaging into their home. Professional results can be obtained from consumer display devices with the right understanding, skills and tools. Reference test signals and simple tutorial programs have become available on DVD for many years to help the consumer make some picture adjustments. These programs are limited, however. The most complete resource for optimizing consumer displays is available in the form of professional calibration services. Such services can be performed by consumers, but only after much study, investment in technical instruments, suitable aptitude, and perseverance. Hiring a trained professional is much less daunting to the average display owner.

In any case, the display owner must keep in mind that the goal of calibration is not to achieve any individual's preconceived notion of what a "good" image should look like. The originator of a given video program is the one responsible for determining how the image is supposed to appear. The goal of calibration is to make the display behave as much like a professional monitor as possible. Ideally, the display should serve as a neutral and accurate communicator of the video signals delivered for the viewer. Only then can artistic integrity, display accuracy, and image fidelity be completely enjoyed. In the end, it's really all about correctly communicating the art.

Best regards and beautiful pictures,
G. Alan Brown, President
CinemaQuest, Inc.
A Lion AV Consultants Affiliate

"Advancing the art and science of electronic imaging"
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post #2 of 80 Old 04-23-2008, 10:26 AM
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This should, without question, be a sticky.

Yes, calibration is important...every user should be calibrated.

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post #3 of 80 Old 04-23-2008, 11:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lcaillo View Post

This should, without question, be a sticky.

....as if that will ever stop the daily "calibration is a marketing fraud" posts
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post #4 of 80 Old 04-23-2008, 11:51 AM - Thread Starter
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....as if that will ever stop the daily "calibration is a marketing fraud" posts

My post was intended to educate and clarify common misunderstanding in both the consumer and professional ranks of the home theater community about the nature of display calibration. Hopefully, rational videophiles and technicians will benefit from having the information to link to. Frankly, I've grown weary of explaining this topic over and over again in various threads on the forum, so at least I will benefit from use of the link.

"Fraud?" I don't expect such cynicism to ever stop. It has been my observation that there is a flaw in human nature that shows up in some folks periodically. That flaw is revealed when facts are ignored when they conflict with preconceived, misbegotten opinions, or threaten a self-serving agenda. Our culture has spawned many attitudes of resentment toward a product or service that costs more than certain individuals can afford or find worthy of the expense. Rather than accepting that they simply have different priorities, or admiring the quality or benefits of said product or service, and working constructively toward acquiring the means to procure it, some types of personalities default to immature resentment and unwarranted criticism. Crybabies are difficult to ignore, but they sometimes persist until they get some attention. Every public forum must tolerate such behavior, up to a point. The reasonable and rational majority will respond to logic and authoritative facts.
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post #5 of 80 Old 04-23-2008, 12:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krasmuzik View Post

....as if that will ever stop the daily "calibration is a marketing fraud" posts

At least we can copy/paste a link instead of re-hashing it 10 billion times.

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post #6 of 80 Old 04-23-2008, 02:48 PM
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I would like to have you calibrators list some of the operating parameters checked/adjusted during a calibration. Listed in easy to understand terms if possible.
For example:
-check adjust average brightness for XX foot candles, or lumens
-Color tracking at some number of brightness levels
-Grey scale tracking at some number of brightness levels
-D6500, what that will deliver to their eyes.
-What equipment will be used, and why.

What I am suggesting if you can spell out what you are going to do, then the curious can understand what you are offering to do. Not just come in their house and adjust the normal user controls to some un-specified format. Its the sales pitch. Convincing any interested propsective buyer of your services, that your services are more than a KaBookie dance.

Perhaps in this thread, you can compile a great sales tool for yourselves, and a URL to point others towards.
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post #7 of 80 Old 04-23-2008, 03:02 PM - Thread Starter
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It would be contrary to the rules of the forum to turn this thread into a sales tool for specific calibration services. It's my position that the details you suggest should be discussed with the individual calibrator(s) you are considering. There is more general detail about the kinds of items included in a typical calibration service over at: www.isfforum.com . I know some calibrators provide a list of service features and steps on their company web sites.

Much depends upon the capabilities and features of the specific TV or projector, whether certain service components could even be performed. Each calibrator includes certain work as part of their "basic service," and other work as optional upgrades. Time is a factor. There's no one formula that works for every display device or every calibrator.
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post #8 of 80 Old 04-23-2008, 04:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by me75006 View Post

I would like to have you calibrators list some of the operating parameters checked/adjusted during a calibration. Listed in easy to understand terms if possible.
For example:
-check adjust average brightness for XX foot candles, or lumens
-Color tracking at some number of brightness levels
-Grey scale tracking at some number of brightness levels
-D6500, what that will deliver to their eyes.
-What equipment will be used, and why.

What I am suggesting if you can spell out what you are going to do, then the curious can understand what you are offering to do. Not just come in their house and adjust the normal user controls to some un-specified format. Its the sales pitch. Convincing any interested propsective buyer of your services, that your services are more than a KaBookie dance.

Perhaps in this thread, you can compile a great sales tool for yourselves, and a URL to point others towards.

The world is buyer beware.

If you are going to drop change on calibration, you should be the one who knows what questions to ask and who you trust.

Joel Barsotti
SpectraCal
CalMAN Lead Developer
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post #9 of 80 Old 04-23-2008, 05:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by me75006 View Post

I would like to have you calibrators list some of the operating parameters checked/adjusted during a calibration. Listed in easy to understand terms if possible.
For example:
-check adjust average brightness for XX foot candles, or lumens
-Color tracking at some number of brightness levels
-Grey scale tracking at some number of brightness levels
-D6500, what that will deliver to their eyes.
-What equipment will be used, and why.

What I am suggesting if you can spell out what you are going to do, then the curious can understand what you are offering to do. Not just come in their house and adjust the normal user controls to some un-specified format. Its the sales pitch. Convincing any interested propsective buyer of your services, that your services are more than a KaBookie dance.

Perhaps in this thread, you can compile a great sales tool for yourselves, and a URL to point others towards.

This has been done many times in many discussions here and elsewhere. Many of the more prominent calibrators have exactly what you request on their web sites. I discuss exactly what I do with every client so that they have a clear idea of what they are getting before we ever agree to do service for them. Most others do the same. If you run into someone who does not then avoid them. Ask questions of the potential calibrators in your area. I am sure you will both find the answers you seek and see that those answers differentiate the pros from the pretenders.

PS: It may be picking nits, but there is not a standard called D6500. It makes me a little crazy to see calibration specialists use the term. There is 6500K, which is a color temperature, but is an ambiguous target. The specification in all of the standards is D65, which has colorimetry defined by a specific coordinate. This is the target white that we actually shoot for.

Yes, calibration is important...every user should be calibrated.

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post #10 of 80 Old 04-23-2008, 05:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krasmuzik View Post

....as if that will ever stop the daily "calibration is a marketing fraud" posts


...and cynicism demonstrates a lack of vision and leadership.

Yes, calibration is important...every user should be calibrated.

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post #11 of 80 Old 04-23-2008, 06:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeAB View Post


Some consumers may actually prefer a distorted picture. For more discriminating viewers, there are resources available that help bring correct imaging into their home. Professional results can be obtained from consumer display devices with the right understanding, skills and tools. Reference test signals and simple tutorial programs have become available on DVD for many years to help the consumer make some picture adjustments.

The goal of calibration is to make the display behave as much like a professional monitor as possible. Ideally, the display should serve as a neutral and accurate communicator of the video signals delivered for the viewer. Only then can artistic integrity, display accuracy, and image fidelity be completely enjoyed. In the end, it's really all about correctly communicating the art.

Best regards and beautiful pictures,
G. Alan Brown, President
CinemaQuest, Inc.

"Advancing the art and science of electronic imaging"


And ironically, the consumer is not to blame. As the media and our government spin events to get us to believe lies, so have the manufacturers of TVs by factory presetting them with these overly bright, overlysaturated garish looking pictures.

Perception IS reality - to the uninformed. Televisions are supposed to look like that! Anything else looks dull or like the set is malfunctioning. The human mind adapts to this mockery. As long as people can see and hear Brian Williams deliver the news every evening, they don't care that his hair is almost black and his face looks like the sunset over Key West! The set came that way, so how could something be wrong with it?

GeorgeAB you nailed it with your intial post, but trying to undo the above will continue to be a far greater challenge than calibrating any actual TV display.

As I may have said before, overcoming doubt & indifference should be a mandatory part of ISF training!
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post #12 of 80 Old 04-23-2008, 07:04 PM
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Originally Posted by D-6500 View Post

And ironically, the consumer is not to blame. As the media and our government spin events to get us to believe lies, so have the manufacturers of TVs by factory presetting them with these overly bright, overlysaturated garish looking pictures.

Perception IS reality - to the uninformed. Televisions are supposed to look like that! Anything else looks dull or like the set is malfunctioning. The human mind adapts to this mockery. As long as people can see and hear Brian Williams deliver the news every evening, they don't care that his hair is almost black and his face looks like the sunset over Key West! The set came that way, so how could something be wrong with it?

GeorgeAB you nailed it with your intial post, but trying to undo the above will continue to be a far greater challenge than calibrating any actual TV display.

As I may have said before, overcoming doubt & indifference should be a mandatory part of ISF training!

Why is anyone to be blamed? Consumers who buy what is pushed at them without looking beyond the surface get what they bargained for. The manufacturers are just doing what they know works with poorly informed consumers. Those that do their homework and look for more can get it. I don't see it as trying to undo the market. We simply educate and serve those who are interested in more. There is a distribution of degrees of demand for accurate imaging just like there is a distribution of intelligence. Remember, by definition, half of the population is of below average intelligence. Probably the same holds true for naivete' among consumers. That leaves quite a few people who might be interested in more than what the vendors give them out of the box.

Yes, calibration is important...every user should be calibrated.

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post #13 of 80 Old 04-23-2008, 07:08 PM
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"Fraud?" I don't expect such cynicism to ever stop. It has been my observation that there is a flaw in human nature that shows up in some folks periodically. That flaw is revealed when facts are ignored when they conflict with preconceived, misbegotten, opinions, or threaten a self-serving agenda. Our culture has spawned many attitudes of resentment toward a product or service that costs more than certain individuals can afford or find worthy of the expense. Rather than accepting that they simply have different priorities, or admiring the quality or benefits of said product or service, and working constructively toward acquiring the means to procure it, some types of personalities default to immature resentment and unwarranted criticism. Crybabies are difficult to ignore, but they sometimes persist until they get some attention. Every public forum must tolerate such behavior, up to a point. The reasonable and rational majority will respond to logic and authoritative facts.

I agree totally !!!!
I get reactions like that when people see i charge 14.99 for a lamb souvlaki dinner, cry babies.

Athanasios
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post #14 of 80 Old 04-23-2008, 07:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by me75006 View Post

I would like to have you calibrators list some of the operating parameters checked/adjusted during a calibration. Listed in easy to understand terms if possible.
For example:
-check adjust average brightness for XX foot candles, or lumens
-Color tracking at some number of brightness levels
-Grey scale tracking at some number of brightness levels
-D6500, what that will deliver to their eyes.
-What equipment will be used, and why.

What I am suggesting if you can spell out what you are going to do, then the curious can understand what you are offering to do. Not just come in their house and adjust the normal user controls to some un-specified format. Its the sales pitch. Convincing any interested propsective buyer of your services, that your services are more than a KaBookie dance.

Perhaps in this thread, you can compile a great sales tool for yourselves, and a URL to point others towards.


A great calibrator Crag Rounds who specializes in Mitsubishi sets and also has done my Marquee 8000 explains very well on his web site what he actually does and why.

http://www.cir-engineering.com/services_01.php

lots of great info there.

Athanasios
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post #15 of 80 Old 04-23-2008, 07:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sotti View Post

The world is buyer beware.

If you are going to drop change on calibration, you should be the one who knows what questions to ask and who you trust.

Oh I did, I used Avical & was completely satisfied. I would have loved to have seen a "sticky" on what an ISF calibration was all about, without having to research a large collection of threads, many of which were, (and still are), over my head. Trying to sort through the offerings found at the different sites was overwhelming at the start, but I sensed there was a valuble service out there.
I understand the large variety of display devices out there, and that there are variances in calibration routines pending device type & model. From my consumers point of view, to be able to read "bulleted" points describing calibration services, is educational & helps me see what I am buying. As was stated, these things have been posted "ad nauseum", but I think a sticky would cut down the "I don't belive it" or "is it worthwhile" posts.
Of course, this is just my 2cents worth.
Regards.
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post #16 of 80 Old 04-23-2008, 09:06 PM
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GeorgeAB, thank you for all your contributions to the betterment of general understanding, you are providing a wonderful database to expand insight in the field of video displays; highly appreciated!

sspears:
(Rules? Rules? In Television???? ÂThow shalt not oversaturateth red. ÂRGB shall be thy rod and thy staff; there shall be no other color space before thee.Â)
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post #17 of 80 Old 04-24-2008, 06:50 AM
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post #18 of 80 Old 04-24-2008, 06:56 AM
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GeorgeAB, thank you for all your contributions to the betterment of general understanding, you are providing a wonderful database to expand insight in the field of video displays; highly appreciated!

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post #19 of 80 Old 04-24-2008, 07:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by D-6500 View Post

... overcoming doubt & indifference should be a mandatory part of ISF training!

Greetings

This area is touched on in ISF training, although perhaps not stressed as much as it should be. There is a lot of material to cover in two days and many attending the class still have the "deer in headlights" look to them.

The THX Video training does put far more emphasis on educating the consumer/client. Understanding the question is more important than simply presenting an answer that people do not understand. Without understanding, a correct answer has no more value than any of the other incorrect answers out there. In all likelihood, it can be perceived to be worse than some wrong answers.

Understanding is key, and thus education is key. The educated client also is then in a far better position to explain to their friends why they got such services in the first place. This is akin to teaching people how to fish rather than just giving them fish to eat.

Regards

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ISF/THX/TLV Video Instructor
The Video Calibration Education Hub - www.TLVEXP.com

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Greetings

This area is touched on in ISF training, although perhaps not stressed as much as it should be. There is a lot of material to cover in two days and many attending the class still have the "deer in headlights" look to them.

The THX Video training does put far more emphasis on educating the consumer/client. Understanding the question is more important than simply presenting an answer that people do not understand. Without understanding, a correct answer has no more value than any of the other incorrect answers out there. In all likelihood, it can be perceived to be worse than some wrong answers.

Understanding is key, and thus education is key. The educated client also is then in a far better position to explain to their friends why they got such services in the first place. This is akin to teaching people how to fish rather than just giving them fish to eat.

Regards

Then what part of:

"To render a more accurate picture"
"To ensure conformity to technical standards"
or
"To ensure that your TV neither adds nor takes away anything from the intended appearance of the presented material"

Does Joe/Jane consumer(or some of my friends) not get?

I also think there's an element of fear at play here.
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post #21 of 80 Old 04-24-2008, 01:53 PM - Thread Starter
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People's brains are wired differently. Individual lives are ordered variously. Aptitudes, talents, inclinations, preferences, value systems, priorities differ greatly between humans. Some just don't get it, never have, never will, and that doesn't make them deficient or wrong....just different.

There will be a certain portion of home entertainment consumers who can be persuaded of the value in calibration. Wondering why others don't see the value isn't a dilemma worth losing sleep over or being frustrated about. Just move on to the next potential customer. If the calibrator is clear, specific and correct about the objectives and benefits of the service, he has done what he can.

The world has plenty of space for folks who esteem an accurate video image, and also folks who are satisfied with different performance. I started this thread for those who want to understand the genuine purpose and objective of display alignment. Getting that wrong has resulted in repeated misrepresentation, confusion, disappointment and resentment expressed on this forum and others.

If a TV owner does not comprehend and/or value image fidelity, they can fall prey to the mistaken notion that it must look "better" to them or it was a waste of effort and money to have it calibrated. "Better" pictures must be understood as "accurate" or the only standard will be the individual preference of the owner of the display. Since calibrators cannot read minds, achieving that standard becomes next to impossible.

Best regards and beautiful pictures,
G. Alan Brown, President
CinemaQuest, Inc.

"Advancing the art and science of electronic imaging"
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post #22 of 80 Old 04-24-2008, 01:58 PM
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I have a friend who I think sums it up best. I tried to offer up a calibration to him as a friend at a HUGELY reduced price. He was like, "It looks good enough to me.". Even at practically nothing being charged, he still wouldn't go for it. I tried to explain the value, but he just wasn't having it.

Some folks are just not reachable no matter what.
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post #23 of 80 Old 04-24-2008, 02:32 PM
 
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Another good analogy of mine:

Ever seen antique window glass? All wavey and rainbowish with tiny bubbles trapped in it?

Just explain to clients that this is what their display is doing to the image, and then use the example of modern office window glass(before tinting is added!) that will not distort or discolor the image in any way!

Either they can stay with the equivalent of antique farmhouse glass or they can get a calibration and get the view out of modern highrise glass.
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post #24 of 80 Old 04-24-2008, 05:32 PM - Thread Starter
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I think you need to come up with a better analogy. I've never seen a modern HDTV that looks remotely like antique glass. The comparison is not credible enough for my use.
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post #25 of 80 Old 04-24-2008, 09:45 PM
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Greetings

I use the Mona Lisa analogy a lot in the THX class.

You are in Paris and you go to the Louvre to see the Mona Lisa painting. Before you can actually get to the painting, you must see a man who gives you the choice of 5 different pairs of tinted sunglasses to wear to view the painting.

One is red tinted ... one is blue tinted ... one green tinted ... one purple tinted ... one yellow tinted.

Which of these sunglasses would you like to wear to view the painting?

What?!! You protest that you do not want to wear any tinted glasses. You want to see the painting the way it is supposed to look. The way the artist wanted it to look.

The way the artist intended ...

If you think that seeing the painting through some tinted sunglasses is perfectly fine as long as it is a tint you like ... then calibration really does not matter anymore. It is time to leave this forum and simply pick up your remote control and have at it. You are the artist and you get the final say on what all the paintings should look like.

Regards

Michael Chen @ The Laser Video Experience
ISF/THX/TLV Video Instructor
The Video Calibration Education Hub - www.TLVEXP.com

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post #26 of 80 Old 04-25-2008, 06:09 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeAB View Post

I think you need to come up with a better analogy. I've never seen a modern HDTV that looks remotely like antique glass. The comparison is not credible enough for my use.

What I meant by that was that some TVs as shipped can have AS DRASTIC an effect of distorting the image as antique glass. I wasn't saying the effect was the same.

Although I thinK Mike TLV's analogy a couple posts down really nails it.
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post #27 of 80 Old 04-25-2008, 10:19 AM - Thread Starter
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Here's a link to a quote from award winning cinematographer, Allen Daviau, about the nature and importance of consumer display calibration in achieving image fidelity: http://www.jkpi.net/allen_daviau.php .
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post #28 of 80 Old 04-29-2008, 12:21 PM - Thread Starter
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Professional-level display calibration used to not be available to consumers. The wide availability of detailed display alignment upon request is primarily attributable to the work of Joe Kane, of Joe Kane Productions, and the organization he founded with Joel Silver- the Imaging Science Foundation. Much of the misunderstanding and disinformation in this field is due to ignorance of some of the history behind that work.

The best single resource I know of that chronicles and illuminates this development in consumer television history is the special edition published by 'Widescreen Review' in 1998 titled: 'Imaging Science Theatre 2000- Everything You Wanted To Know About Video But Were Afraid To Ask.' I recommend this back issue to anyone serious about consumer video. It is suitable for the reference library of every display calibrator and enormously helpful to anyone interested in imaging science. Copies are still available from 'Widescreen Review,' and here: http://www.cinemaquestinc.com/isf-mag.htm .
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post #29 of 80 Old 04-29-2008, 02:13 PM
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Personally, I feel incredibly fortunate to have access to these forums. They have saved me a LOT of time and money. The advice you get here is above and beyond what one could possibly as for at no cost!

So, when there are things like magazine articles, of course I don't expect to get them free, I've already gotten more than I could ask for on here.

I feel so fortunate to have the time, energy, and advice of such intelligent people such as GeorgeAB on these forums for FREE, that when I finally get an opportunity to compensate them for their efforts, I jump all over it!

I want to give my money to the people out there who will use it to further enhance my home theater experience, and I'm not ignorant enough to think they can do all this for free all the time.

Case in point; I just received my Ideal-lume standard light today, if not for GeorgeAB's FREE advice, I would not have know what I was missing out on. He did not force me to purchase his product, I decided I needed it myself based on his free information!

I actually feel a little guilty that I got this wonderful product for such a cheap price, I feel like they're not charging enough for these and I want people like GeorgeAB to stay in business. He makes products that are great for the price. He could do bigger marketing, crazy commercials, and outright lying about his products and charge about 5 times as much for them, like some other companies I can think of!

In other words, if you enjoy your home theater experience, then you need to show a little support so that it can continue and not give way to Bose and Ambilight!!

-Brian

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(Rules? Rules? In Television???? ÂThow shalt not oversaturateth red. ÂRGB shall be thy rod and thy staff; there shall be no other color space before thee.Â)
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post #30 of 80 Old 04-30-2008, 08:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael TLV View Post

Greetings

I use the Mona Lisa analogy a lot in the THX class.

You are in Paris and you go to the Louvre to see the Mona Lisa painting. Before you can actually get to the painting, you must see a man who gives you the choice of 5 different pairs of tinted sunglasses to wear to view the painting.

One is red tinted ... one is blue tinted ... one green tinted ... one purple tinted ... one yellow tinted.

Which of these sunglasses would you like to wear to view the painting?

What?!! You protest that you do not want to wear any tinted glasses. You want to see the painting the way it is supposed to look. The way the artist wanted it to look.

The way the artist intended ...

If you think that seeing the painting through some tinted sunglasses is perfectly fine as long as it is a tint you like ... then calibration really does not matter anymore. It is time to leave this forum and simply pick up your remote control and have at it. You are the artist and you get the final say on what all the paintings should look like.

Regards

The Mona Lisa is perhaps not the analogy you want since you only get to view the painting through some think tinted glass that protects it from all of the flash photography that happens (and any potential vandalism).

That being said, I always found the Mona Lisa hard to appreciate until I went through an exhibit at the Clos du Luce in Amboise and then went to the Louvre and saw it in person. There is a LOT that this painting teaches about how we see color, so its use as a teaching aid may be more apt than many realize (e.g., the shading on the face is done by varying the amount of paint applied to the canvas -- a visceral demonstration of how grayscale works; the build-up of the layers is also what gives the painting the amazing depth for which it is famous).

Bill

Color accuracy evangelist and CalMAN insider
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