Best to have two separate players for 3D Blu Ray & Standard Blu Ray calibrations - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 15 Old 08-15-2010, 05:08 PM - Thread Starter
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Is it best to have one Blu Ray player for 3D and another for standard content so you can have two separate inputs calibrated or does is it work out OK to have one player with one input calibrated by switching between separate settings?

Any info is greatly appreciated!

Thanks,
Pablo
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post #2 of 15 Old 08-15-2010, 09:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by el pablo View Post

Is it best to have one Blu Ray player for 3D and another for standard content so you can have two separate inputs calibrated or does is it work out OK to have one player with one input calibrated by switching between separate settings?

Any info is greatly appreciated!

Thanks,
Pablo

I suppose that would depend a bit on the capabilities of the TV.

Some sets have more or less options specifically for the 3D mode.

I see where you're coming from and it's not completely crazy, but it is pretty out there

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post #3 of 15 Old 08-15-2010, 09:34 PM - Thread Starter
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I'll be using a Samsung PNC8000 Plasma and someone else on the forum mentioned that it is beneficial to have separate calibrations for 3D and standard Blu Ray which lead me to this question because I only have one player.
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post #4 of 15 Old 08-15-2010, 09:56 PM
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1 player to 1 input. Say for example you calibrate movie mode for your normal viewing. When you switch 3D mode on, you again can choose movie mode, but it's numbers can and should be different. Then when 3D mode is turned off, it goes back to the normal movie mode settings.
Once you switch both 3D and 2D to movie mode and calibrate each, then when you switch 3D mode on and off I'm pretty sure it will remember your picture mode and settings so you don't have to switch back and forth.

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post #5 of 15 Old 08-16-2010, 11:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by el pablo View Post

Is it best to have one Blu Ray player for 3D and another for standard content so you can have two separate inputs calibrated or does is it work out OK to have one player with one input calibrated by switching between separate settings?

Any info is greatly appreciated!

Thanks,
Pablo

I haven't messed with a Samsung 3D TV yet, but have worked with Panasonic and Sony 3D displays... both of them have completely different memories for 2D and 3D modes. That means they are almost like 2 completely separate TVs... the 2D TV has all of it's controls and the 3D TV has a completely separate set of controls.

If the Samsung TVs operate the same way, having 2 disc players would be a complete waste of time/money. If the Samsung 3D TVs have a single shared memory for 2D AND 3D, then having 2 disc players is maybe useful. BUT, some 3D Blu-ray players have 2 HDMI outputs so if your audio needs are taken care of when using only one of those HDMI outputs, you could use the second HDMI output for a second connection and you wouldn't need 2 disc player.

THEN there's the issue of whether the TV has separate memories for each input or not. If 2D and 3D share 1 memory, it possible all the inputs share 1 memory also... so having 2 Blu-ray players would again, be a waste of time and money.

More than likely, if the TV has 1 memory for each input, there will be separate memories for 2D and 3D - but you always have to check. And it is EASY to check. While viewing a 2D program, look at the setting for some easy control... say Contrat. Let's say it is set to 80 while you are watching 2D. Now change to a 3D program (or perhaps manually force the TV into 3D mode if your TV permits that) and look at the Contrast control setting again. If it is a different number than the 2D setting, you have separate 2D and 3D memories. If it IS the same number, change the 3D setting... say to 70. Then exit 3D mode and go back to 2D mode and see what the Contrast control setting is... if the setting is still 80, your 2D and 3D modes have separate memories. If the 2D contrast setting changed to 70, then your 2D and 3D modes share the same memory and there might be something to gain by using 2 inputs. BUT, you can't assume that. You then have to do a similar test using 2 different HDMI inputs.

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post #6 of 15 Old 08-16-2010, 04:09 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks a million for your input guys! There are separate movie mode memory banks for each but I didn't know if it would be beneficial to have two separate devices to also have separate N&D settings for each.

I plan on using my PS3 for both 3D and standard Blu Ray but would also like to have a separate calibration for video games. I assume this would be an issue but maybe I could connect the PS3 to a HDMI splitter to get around this?
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post #7 of 15 Old 08-16-2010, 05:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by el pablo View Post

Thanks a million for your input guys! There are separate movie mode memory banks for each but I didn't know if it would be beneficial to have two separate devices to also have separate N&D settings for each.

I plan on using my PS3 for both 3D and standard Blu Ray but would also like to have a separate calibration for video games. I assume this would be an issue but maybe I could connect the PS3 to a HDMI splitter to get around this?

No game mode should be the same as movie mode.

sRGB and Rec.709 are similiar enough that a single calibration will work for both equally well. sRGB is the defacto starndard for PC content (although there are other standards depending on what you want your PC to do).

Not to mention if you are making a game to play on an HDTV, you should be authoring your content for Rec.709.

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post #8 of 15 Old 08-16-2010, 10:40 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sotti View Post

No game mode should be the same as movie mode.

sRGB and Rec.709 are similiar enough that a single calibration will work for both equally well. sRGB is the defacto starndard for PC content (although there are other standards depending on what you want your PC to do).

Not to mention if you are making a game to play on an HDTV, you should be authoring your content for Rec.709.

I thought that game mode only supports standard color settings so it loses accuracy quality?
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post #9 of 15 Old 08-17-2010, 01:38 AM
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You can't really calibrate for games. There are no video standards being followed by game manufacturers. If you make 1 game look good, the next 10 games might not look as good. The best thing you can do is to calibrate the PS3 input with a video signal generator and leave it at that. The PS3 is quite accurate in regards to color. If the game was done by someone who has industry-standard workstations, the game will want the same calibration as a Blu-ray disc. If the game wasn't done using industry standard workstations, you probably will never be able to match it perfectly. Game color is so arbitrary most of the time, you wouldn't necessarily know if the green or red you are looking is ia correct or not.

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post #10 of 15 Old 08-17-2010, 02:20 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks for sharing that info Doug! So it sounds like the calibration for Blu Ray should also be fine for gaming?
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post #11 of 15 Old 08-17-2010, 10:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by el pablo View Post

Thanks for sharing that info Doug! So it sounds like the calibration for Blu Ray should also be fine for gaming?

sRGB/Rec.709 is the only calibration profile that you could possibly calibrate for.

Highend AAA titles like blizzard, Valve, Id software will be very accurate and spend alot of time doing color and gamma correction to make sure their assests appear exactly as designed.

Basically games are like cable. The best stuff looks great with Rec.709, the bad stuff is just bad.

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post #12 of 15 Old 08-17-2010, 11:02 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sotti View Post

sRGB/Rec.709 is the only calibration profile that you could possibly calibrate for.

Highend AAA titles like blizzard, Valve, Id software will be very accurate and spend alot of time doing color and gamma correction to make sure their assests appear exactly as designed.

Basically games are like cable. The best stuff looks great with Rec.709, the bad stuff is just bad.

Excuse my ignorance as I don't know what Rec.709 refers to. Are you saying the same calibration used for Blu Ray should be sufficient for video games?

Thanks again!
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post #13 of 15 Old 08-18-2010, 02:04 AM
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Video industry pros are trying to educate the gaming community and get them onboard and following the same standards used in creating home video content on DVD and Blu-ray. Some game producers are adopting standards. Some games are actually THX certified and those, especially, will match (relatively) movies released on Blu-ray disc. It would be just silly to have a different calibration required for games vs movies. There's no reason to require different calibrations for games and movies - except that the gaming community is not yet completely on-board regarding following the industry standard d65 reference point and in using neutral viewing environments and calibrated video displays. Things are improving a little every year, and some game outfits just don't have the resources and/or discipline to do everything "right". That said, I've never seen a game that was so off, color wise or grayscale-wise that it didn't look reasonably good using a standard calibration like you'd have for Blu-ray movies.

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post #14 of 15 Old 08-18-2010, 02:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by el pablo View Post

Excuse my ignorance as I don't know what Rec.709 refers to. Are you saying the same calibration used for Blu Ray should be sufficient for video games?

Thanks again!
Pablo

Rec.709 is the standard for how to encode color for HDTV and Blu-Ray.

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post #15 of 15 Old 08-18-2010, 02:20 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks a million guys, you rock! That's good news as I was worried that having a PS3 for games and Blu Ray may mean that you have to choice one calibration over the other.
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