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Old 10-26-2015, 04:49 AM
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Originally Posted by kkpro View Post
If I purchased the lightspace disc, can Calman control my Oppo 103 to make it automated? I tried asking in the Oppo thread without a response.


Hi, You have to use a small utility for the automated measurement, that has been written to work with Ted's Disk + CalMAN...and sends timed commands to CalMAN to take the measurements.

For example, when you want measure 11-Point Grayscale (12 Patches), 4-Point Saturation (25 Patches) using the Calibration Disk as a pattern source; each measurement run will require from the user to use the Blu-Ray Player Remote, to select the required Chapter and using the mouse from the calibration software to press 'measure' to read each patch with the meter and after each read to use the Blu-Ray Remote next chapter button to select the next required color patch, this is happening with all other calibration disks except Ted's LightSpace CMS Calibration Disk becasue I have added the capability of measuring with CalMAN with Semi-Automated or Automated these measurement runs:

CalMAN's 11-Point Grayscale
CalMAN's 21-Point Grayscale
CalMAN's 4-Point Saturation with 100% or 75% Stimulus Level (25 Colors)
CalMAN's 5-Point Saturation with 100% or 75% Stimulus Level (31 Colors)
CalMAN's 10-Point Saturation with 100% or 75% Stimulus Level (61 Colors)
CalMAN's 4-Point Luminance (28 Colors)
CalMAN's 5-Point Luminance (35 Colors)
CalMAN's 10-Point Luminance (70 Colors)
CalMAN’s Color Checker Classic (24 Colors)
CalMAN’s Color Checker SG (96 Colors)
CalMAN’s Color Checker SG Fleshtones (19 Colors)

Using Ted's LightSpace CMS Calibration Disk with CalMAN, there 2 unique measurement ways (not available at other calibration disks):

Semi/Automated (CalMAN/ChromaPure)
; where the Disk Chapter is auto-changing to next required color patch per 2/6/10sec. and the user use only the measure button with it's mouse (not using the blu-ray remote anymore).

Automated (CalMAN); where the Disk Chapter is auto-changing to next required color patch per 2/6/10sec. and a external utility is pressing timed the measure button so the user don't need to use it's mouse again until the end of the measurement run of each chapter.

I'm using a small utility that sends timed keyboard shortcuts commands to CalMAN, to able to measure using CalMAN without user prompt.

These 2 measurement solutions using Ted's LightSpace CMS Calibration Disk saves user some operations or all operations for the user until the end of these measurement runs that are described here or Ted's LightSpace CMS Calibration Disk

The chapters of the disk has been created based to the exact color patch order that CalMAN requests them.... and the color patches are auto-changing to the next required patch per measurement run with the available time options to autochange the patterns for every 2 / 6 / 10 sec.

Klein Colorimeter users will be able to use 2 sec per pattern to measure every chapter rapidly. i1Display PRO, SpectraCAL's C6, XRite's i1PRO1/2, and basICColor DISCUS users will be able to use the 6 or 10 second display time per each color patch chapter.....this has to do with meter settings/ type of display....if the display has deep blacks and the meter will take more time to measure the darkest shades then maybe the 6 sec per patch will not work, but the 10 sec per patch will work for sure.



For the users that the black level measurement takes more than 10 sec. they can use the Batch file without black measurement and enter their black level manually to CalMAN Settings.



Anyone who want to try how it works, you can download the Free Version to measure the performance of your display using the ColorCheckerClassic Chapter (24 Color Patches).

There a lot of professionals that are using this method of Automated measurement with their Klein K-10A, where the patterns are AutoChanging per 2 seconds and you can setup Klein to have 1sec pattern delay before each meter read also.For 11-Point Grayscale it takes 2M 24sec, for 4-Point Saturation it takes 5M 12Sec with Klein K-10A.I have posted how this works here: Ted's LightSpace CMS Calibration Disk.

Ted's LightSpace CMS Calibration Disk Free Version for Free Calibration Software: LightSpace DPS / CalMAN ColorChecker / HCFR
S/W: LightSpace CMS, SpaceMan ICC, SpaceMatch DCM, CalMAN 5, CalMAN RGB, ChromaPure, ControlCAL
V/P: eeColor 3D LUT Box - P/G: DVDO AVLab TPG
Meters: JETI Specbos 1211, Klein K-10A, i1PRO2, i1PRO, SpectraCAL C6, i1D3, C5

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Old 11-05-2015, 03:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Charles Tintera View Post
I viewed part of the "Basic" video. If I understand what I saw the set up was a laptop and a video generator feeding thru HDMI to an LCD/LED TV. Is the video generator strictly necessary?
A video generator would not be an item I would expect to be casually available.
Hi, the external hardware pattern generator or the software pattern generator that each calibration software features (via Notebook or PC HDMI Output as Extended Desktop) it always a good idea that saves some time from doing manual measurements while is not the ideal because you are not calibrating from your real player which will playback your favorite movies later.

So there is a possibility for the calibration software based to the measurements it took using an external pattern generator to tell you that you are OK and accurate, but when you will playback the movie may have problems because you will have skipped to calibrate your whole video signal chain.

Blu-Ray Players/Media Players, each model (or sometimes a different firmware version) of any brand may different output, each brand Pattern Generators have different output also, and Tom Huffman has examined at past 3 different pattern generators that is showing that there measurable difference between them. Imagine that there were differences between reference pattern generator which designed to be accurate.

From consumer level devices with realistic budget that any any enthusiast can buy, you can test to see if your source (blu-ray/media player) has accurate output using a DVDO AV-Lab TPG with ColorChecker Function where it can examine the Player's RGB Triplets to find if it's accurate or not....before that device release it was only possible by very expensive Quantum Data HDMI Analyser or a very expensive Waveform Monitors.

Noone can know if every single consumer blu-ray/media player (count also the so many different firmware versions of each player around the world) that is available in consumer market has accurate output, unless it's measured.

Calibrating using a Mobile Phone or an external reference pattern generator makes no sense if later your player will add color errors. It just saves some time from using a calibration disk.



When you will use the available display internal calibration controls to calibrate, 10/20-Point Grayscale/Gamma and Full CMS (Hue/Saturation/Lightness of Primary or Secondary colors...of part of these controls...it has to do with the capability of controls that the display will feature....for example Sony 2015 models have 10-Point Grayscale, no Full CMS or Sony 2014 or earlier have 2-Point Grayscale and no Full CMS....while almost all Samsung's have 10-Point Grayscale and Full CMS etc. etc...) The required patterns for measurements you will only have to measure 11 (Grayscale) + 6 (Colors for CMS) = 17 patterns in total, multiple times, it's not so many to say that an external pattern generator that will save a lot of time for this job.

Calibrating using a Calibration Disk which you will playback from the exact Blu-Ray/Media Player you will use later to watch your movies is still most accurate way of calibrating a consumer setup, calibrating and correcting errors to the whole video signal chain.

Ted's LightSpace CMS Calibration Disk Free Version for Free Calibration Software: LightSpace DPS / CalMAN ColorChecker / HCFR
S/W: LightSpace CMS, SpaceMan ICC, SpaceMatch DCM, CalMAN 5, CalMAN RGB, ChromaPure, ControlCAL
V/P: eeColor 3D LUT Box - P/G: DVDO AVLab TPG
Meters: JETI Specbos 1211, Klein K-10A, i1PRO2, i1PRO, SpectraCAL C6, i1D3, C5
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Old 01-05-2016, 09:15 PM
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Wow, long thread!

I'm curious, like many others, if there is significant benefit to one disc over the others, for someone who is not intimately familiar with TV calibration and does not have or intend to get a colorimeter (but does like to tinker and tweak things).

I have the WOW disc, which I found to be overly simplistic and generally very basic. I'd really love to dive into the CMS settings, but I just don't have the time & money to invest in the tools and learn all the intimate details of calibration. I suppose I can live with the results of a calibration disc if they'll get me ~80-90% there, rather than spending hundreds of dollars and hours chasing the final 10-20%. Some people swear by DVE HD Basics and particularly Spears & Munsil, so I'm wondering if they provide a noticeable advantage over WOW... and would give me a bit more to evaluate, tweak and tinker with. While I have no doubt that TED's disc is the best around, I still need something that tells me what each test pattern is used for and what it should look like with the ideal settings, and it sounds like TED's disc is 1) geared more towards calibration with instruments, and 2) not very self explanatory for "advanced beginners."

I recently picked up a copy of DVE (the DVD) for my non-HD sources, and I'm considering Spears & Munsil if it'll help me figure out which color temperature setting is more accurate and continue to tweak and improve my picture beyond what the WOW disc got me.

I was relatively pleased with the WOW results (though not overly impressed by the difference) until I noticed that I can change color temperature settings to get a drastically different looking picture, and the useless blue filter test looks correct with each and every one! That's not helpful! Surely there must be some way to get it into the right ball park without expensive instruments?
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Old 01-06-2016, 02:01 PM
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Originally Posted by SabresfortheCup View Post
I was relatively pleased with the WOW results (though not overly impressed by the difference) until I noticed that I can change color temperature settings to get a drastically different looking picture, and the useless blue filter test looks correct with each and every one! That's not helpful! Surely there must be some way to get it into the right ball park without expensive instruments?
Hi, If you like, look my post here: What is the best calibration disc???

where I have explained why using Blue Filters Glasses will not work and what you can/can't do with a calibration disk only.

I recommend you to get the X-Rite's i1Display PRO meter (about $199) and use free calibration software like HCFR or LightSpace DPS to calibrate your displays.

Most of the users believe that by using only a calibration disk is enough, but the improvement is larger when you will use meter/software.

The meter/software will help the user to do the proper adjustments to be able to see how a calibrated display have to look like.

Without tools, users don't have a idea how calibrated colors looks-like and most of the times users are selecting the worse colorspace/gamma/color temp modes when judging with their eyes only because these models look better, have more impressive colors etc. and they believe that they have calibrated their displays because they used a calibration disk.

Ted's LightSpace CMS Calibration Disk Free Version for Free Calibration Software: LightSpace DPS / CalMAN ColorChecker / HCFR
S/W: LightSpace CMS, SpaceMan ICC, SpaceMatch DCM, CalMAN 5, CalMAN RGB, ChromaPure, ControlCAL
V/P: eeColor 3D LUT Box - P/G: DVDO AVLab TPG
Meters: JETI Specbos 1211, Klein K-10A, i1PRO2, i1PRO, SpectraCAL C6, i1D3, C5

Last edited by ConnecTEDDD; 01-06-2016 at 02:13 PM.
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Old 01-06-2016, 03:27 PM
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Originally Posted by ConnecTEDDD View Post
Without tools, users don't have a idea how calibrated colors looks-like and most of the times users are selecting the worse colorspace/gamma/color temp modes when judging with their eyes only because these models look better, have more impressive colors etc. and they believe that they have calibrated their displays because they used a calibration disk.
Isn't it a funny thing. I was doing a touch up a week or two past and as a test lowering red from 312 to 300/329 to 315 and so on yet how little difference it looks on the patterns. That is until you run content through it. Funny (strange) how true it is from past posts of Doug's how your eyes can really fool you on greyscale percentages steps.

Even though when one knows D65 is pastel colours so to speak, how quickly your eyes can adapt to a bad picture from any changes. You know it looks wrong from that soft pastel looking picture. As you certainly cannot adjust it with moving pictures like some people think they can achieve.


Though, first time seeing the Christopher Reeve Superman films under correct calibration. Is it just me or are the older films quite special? That soft blue subtle shiny suit texture and soft rich red really is something. For such an old basic spandex suit. Even the grading of the films more so Superman 3, it really is stunning. As well as Lana's pastel dresses in Smallville was something. It was such a lovely picture including the build up to the barley field.

Same for the Dirty Harry films. America seems so extremely lovely and sunny back in the 70s/80s for films? Even the likes of Thunderbolt and Lightfoot and Every Which Way You Can films.

Though the biggest shock to my memory banks in Superman 3 from the CRT days as a child of the 80s, was the shadow detail on the Statue of Liberty as the evil Superman had flown in. I remember his suit looking close to black since it was likely crushed back on the set then. A lot of these old 70s/early 80s films truly are stunning. Or maybe it is the lack of CGI. Something seems so natural compared to most present day films. Something about it is hard to describe. A sense of analogue perhaps?
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Old 01-06-2016, 08:34 PM
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Thanks for the response Ted, I had read through all the previous posts on the thread (well, skimmed some of the more technical ones, as I got lost a few times). I saw that, very early on, a few folks talked about how each disc has something that the others don't and how your disc has everything that the others do and then some. Someone talked about the patterns that help identify color temperature and color clipping on DVE and/or Spears & Munsil, but at the end of the day it seems a disc alone doesn't get you much. So I suppose I wouldn't have much incentive to pick up one of the other discs, or wouldn't be able to improve much over what I already got with WOW. Shame, I'd really like to tinker some more, but I guess the reality is that there are only so many things you can adjust with test patterns alone.

$200 is still a little steep considering that I'll essentially using it as a "set it and forget it" tool. Too bad you can't rent one! Would perhaps the older, cheaper X-rite eye-one Display 2 Color Calibrator get me close enough, instead of the i1 Display Pro? Would either device take a lot of research to learn to use properly?

Moreover, is the color calibration really "close enough" by choosing "Warm" on the color temperature and leaving it at that? Is the color calibration significantly noticeable? If the colorimeter helps me get from ~50% calibrated to "100%" calibrated and leave me with a crystal clear picture, maybe it's worthwhile, but if the discs get me to 80%, Maybe the last 20% just isn't worth $200?

I don't really know, having never gone through a real calibration before. Is the difference obvious, or is it more subtle?
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Old 01-09-2016, 03:43 PM
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Originally Posted by SabresfortheCup View Post
Wow, long thread!

I'm curious, like many others, if there is significant benefit to one disc over the others, for someone who is not intimately familiar with TV calibration and does not have or intend to get a colorimeter (but does like to tinker and tweak things).

I have the WOW disc, which I found to be overly simplistic and generally very basic. I'd really love to dive into the CMS settings, but I just don't have the time & money to invest in the tools and learn all the intimate details of calibration. I suppose I can live with the results of a calibration disc if they'll get me ~80-90% there, rather than spending hundreds of dollars and hours chasing the final 10-20%. Some people swear by DVE HD Basics and particularly Spears & Munsil, so I'm wondering if they provide a noticeable advantage over WOW... and would give me a bit more to evaluate, tweak and tinker with. While I have no doubt that TED's disc is the best around, I still need something that tells me what each test pattern is used for and what it should look like with the ideal settings, and it sounds like TED's disc is 1) geared more towards calibration with instruments, and 2) not very self explanatory for "advanced beginners."

I recently picked up a copy of DVE (the DVD) for my non-HD sources, and I'm considering Spears & Munsil if it'll help me figure out which color temperature setting is more accurate and continue to tweak and improve my picture beyond what the WOW disc got me.

I was relatively pleased with the WOW results (though not overly impressed by the difference) until I noticed that I can change color temperature settings to get a drastically different looking picture, and the useless blue filter test looks correct with each and every one! That's not helpful! Surely there must be some way to get it into the right ball park without expensive instruments?
I'm kinda in the same situation you are. I don't mind spending the $200 dollars either. I just have a feeling I might be pulling my hair out . Im in my 50's and computers arent my strong suit. I would like to try it though , kinda on the fence .
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Old 01-09-2016, 08:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SabresfortheCup View Post
$200 is still a little steep considering that I'll essentially using it as a "set it and forget it" tool. Too bad you can't rent one! Would perhaps the older, cheaper X-rite eye-one Display 2 Color Calibrator get me close enough, instead of the i1 Display Pro? Would either device take a lot of research to learn to use properly?

Moreover, is the color calibration really "close enough" by choosing "Warm" on the color temperature and leaving it at that? Is the color calibration significantly noticeable? If the colorimeter helps me get from ~50% calibrated to "100%" calibrated and leave me with a crystal clear picture, maybe it's worthwhile, but if the discs get me to 80%, Maybe the last 20% just isn't worth $200?

I don't really know, having never gone through a real calibration before. Is the difference obvious, or is it more subtle?
Warm2 on one of my Samsung LEDs certainly wasn't warm or close to D65. Years ago it used to drive me nuts until I invested into this as I knew something was seriously wrong with my picture settings, even from stock Movie. Blacks were blue, ginger hair was saturated/grungy and whites were awful from so much blue gain. As you can imagine, the skin tones were pale magenta, not healthy at all. At the same time any dark scenes had a horrid blue cast through it all and the likes of Tron Legacy getting suited up, the floor was like a river of blue dancing about. The Underworld films used to drive me crazy with it. Default measured fairly close to 11,000K.

I guess it really depends how bad ones display is if they feel it is worth it. Most don't know what D65 looks like. Since most are accustomed to how that TV was setup from the factory. As somebody out there is always complaining something is wrong with their picture but doesn't know how to sort it. So they copy settings.

A disc alone certainly wont get you anywhere near half way. Since all that will help with is setting your black level so it isn't too bright or too dark. As well as making sure contrast isn't discoloured and to adjust sharpness.

Then of course with hardware and software, black level even after a disc setup can never truly be right until one has measured the gamma to see what it is doing.

I certainly don't regret getting into all this. You'll never know how bad the display is until it has been measured. At least with a professional you'll get it done for several hundreds in the space of 2 - 4 hours. Rather than spending weeks/months learning about it.

Nothing beats enjoying a lovely pristine natural picture. Every film, TV series, sports and gaming is such a joy.
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Old 01-10-2016, 08:14 AM
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Warm2 on one of my Samsung LEDs certainly wasn't warm or close to D65. Years ago it used to drive me nuts until I invested into this as I knew something was seriously wrong with my picture settings, even from stock Movie. Blacks were blue, ginger hair was saturated/grungy and whites were awful from so much blue gain. As you can imagine, the skin tones were pale magenta, not healthy at all. At the same time any dark scenes had a horrid blue cast through it all and the likes of Tron Legacy getting suited up, the floor was like a river of blue dancing about. The Underworld films used to drive me crazy with it. Default measured fairly close to 11,000K.

I guess it really depends how bad ones display is if they feel it is worth it. Most don't know what D65 looks like. Since most are accustomed to how that TV was setup from the factory. As somebody out there is always complaining something is wrong with their picture but doesn't know how to sort it. So they copy settings.

A disc alone certainly wont get you anywhere near half way. Since all that will help with is setting your black level so it isn't too bright or too dark. As well as making sure contrast isn't discoloured and to adjust sharpness.

Then of course with hardware and software, black level even after a disc setup can never truly be right until one has measured the gamma to see what it is doing.

I certainly don't regret getting into all this. You'll never know how bad the display is until it has been measured. At least with a professional you'll get it done for several hundreds in the space of 2 - 4 hours. Rather than spending weeks/months learning about it.

Nothing beats enjoying a lovely pristine natural picture. Every film, TV series, sports and gaming is such a joy.
I'm seriously thinking about making the plunge and buying the xrite pro meter for $199 and renting the video series from the Michael's calibration website . Any other advice would be great thanks Chris
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Old 01-14-2016, 09:52 AM
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See, I'm leaning the other way. The picture looks fine to me. To my eye, blacks look black, colors look reasonably natural and neutral, and highs look white. I'm all for tweaking things to get the best possible performance, but I guess I'm concluding that if it doesn't look bad to me now, it's not work $200 to get just a slightly better picture. If there was a $30-50 solution (calibration disc or the x-rite i1Display LT/ eye-one Display 2 monitor calibration), I'd go for it and tinker away, but for $200, I'd rather put that towards speakers, movies and games/a console.

Does anyone have any experience with the i1Display LT and/or eye-one Display 2 (the little egg shaped camera)? Does it work just as well as the i1Display Pro, or can it at least get you in the ballpark and confirm whether your colors are reasonably close? And I understand that to translate from "PC monitor settings" to "TV Settings" you need software similar to what Calman puts out, in addition to the x-rite software... sounds like more $$?
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Old 01-14-2016, 09:57 AM
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Just pick up the free AVS HD709 disk and make what adjustments you can and see if that improves your pq a bit. Write down your current settings and then adjust away with the disk. If it doesn't improve what you see or is not satisfactory, then dial your panel back to what you have now and be happy. Zero cost, minimal time investment, and a learning experience. Not bad for a Saturday afternoon.
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Old 01-14-2016, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by SabresfortheCup View Post
See, I'm leaning the other way. The picture looks fine to me. To my eye, blacks look black, colors look reasonably natural and neutral, and highs look white. I'm all for tweaking things to get the best possible performance, but I guess I'm concluding that if it doesn't look bad to me now, it's not work $200 to get just a slightly better picture. If there was a $30-50 solution (calibration disc or the x-rite i1Display LT/ eye-one Display 2 monitor calibration), I'd go for it and tinker away, but for $200, I'd rather put that towards speakers, movies and games/a console.

Does anyone have any experience with the i1Display LT and/or eye-one Display 2 (the little egg shaped camera)? Does it work just as well as the i1Display Pro, or can it at least get you in the ballpark and confirm whether your colors are reasonably close? And I understand that to translate from "PC monitor settings" to "TV Settings" you need software similar to what Calman puts out, in addition to the x-rite software... sounds like more $$?
I wouldn't recommend it.(Display2) It will get you in the ballpark kindaish, if you're gonna do 2 step greyscale, but I wouldn't trust it to do any gamut readings. Works OK on LCDs though, but not on plasmas. Anyways, they are almost given away on ebay so it could be a great beginner device with HCFR and HDMI out from your laptop.
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Old 01-15-2016, 03:01 PM
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hi, evverybody i use ted calibration disc with a photo research and Klein it's the best of the calibration disc
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Old 12-13-2016, 05:40 PM
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What is the better calibration disc... Disney WOW or the DVE disc??
I 'calibrated' using disks like Disney WOW and my eyeballs for over a decade before taking the plunge to purchase an i1DisplayPro two years ago now and it was the best $150 I have ever spent.

And the best $30 I gave ever spent in my quest for improved and more accurate video was for Ted's Lightspace Disk.

Ted's Disk has every pattern you could possibly imagine and I have not yet run into a dituation was I was facing a calibration challange, sent an email to Ted, and did not get a response indicating where I could find a pattern to resolve the issue.

GCD and AVSHD709 are also very useful when learning to calibrate and they are free, so starting there makes sense for most, but my advice to any and all calibrators thinking of plunking down a small amount of coin to actually purchase a disk is that your $30 will be better spent on Ted's Lightspace Disk than Disney WOW, Spears & Munsil, or anything else you can find at a similar pricepoint.

Firstly, most of what those 'eyeball' disks include is already on the free AVSHD708 disk, which is free. So if you want to start calibrating with eyeballs-only, that's a better option.

Secondly, even if you're trying to get farther with eyeballs only, Ted's Fisk is invaluable to go beyond the basics.

As an example, I've recently figured out that all of the classic black pluge patterns do not work for setting Brightness on an OLED for dark-room viewing (by eyeball).

The reason is that the bright white numbers and brighter bars lead your eyes to thinking they are seeing black when actually they are seeing something brighter than that (glowing black).

Ted's Fisk is the in,y one that contains an 0.5% window (video level 17) in his near-black patterns and this turns out to be the best pattern out there right now to set Brightness on an OLED. The bright chapter numbers flash for a moment and then the pattern turns pure black (video level 16) with a central 0.5% (video level 17) window. It can be paused on that pattern and once the bright pause marker has disappeared and your eyes have adjusted to the dark, you can see perfect black.

I kept using pluge patterns to set Brightness at 54 or 52 but then during a dark scene of a movie, would notice that my letterbox bars were glowing. Using the 0.5% pattern, I could see that with brightness at 50, level 16 background was ink black while 0.5% level 17 was just visible to my dark-adjusted eyeballs (my i1DisplayPro reads 0.000, meaning below 0.0005 cd/m2).

Since calibrating brightness to 50 using Ted's Lughtspace 0.5% pattern, my blacks are truly 'perfect' and my letterbox bars never glo.

Ted's Lightspace Disk is a very professional set of patterns that can be used by beginning enthusiasts, devoted hobbiest/DIYers, and professional calibrators alike.

It goes way beyond what a newbie dipping their toes in will need, and for that reason, the free patterns (AVSHD709, GCD) may be a better place to start. But again, if you are interested enough to spend money on a disk, spending that money on Ted's Lightspace Disk would be a far wiser investment than picking up WOW or S&M...
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Old 12-22-2016, 09:25 AM
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I've been struggling calibrating my LG OLED using the AVSHD709 patterns as mentioned above. Ted's disk allowed me to properly set the black level, but also identify the issues that CMS introduces through the colour ramp and luminance patterns.

I can thoroughly recommend the disk and I don't even have a meter (yet). Plus Ted gave me some excellent advice on the best way to calibrate the 2016 OLEDs, which I will be relaying to my pro calibrator. For $30 it's a no brainer, especially compared to the amount of money we all invest in our TVs.
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Old 01-18-2017, 01:42 PM
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Ted's Lightspace calibration disc is the best disc I could find on the internet. Ted's LightSpace CMS Calibration Disk




In the beginning I only used a few parts of it, but as I get smarter I realize everything I ever could have wanted is there. The man himself is probably one of the most knowledgeable people in the world on the subject and is able to explain things to you very well. Don't be intimidated because of the million and 1 uses of the disc, because there's a good chance you'll grow to use more of those patterns that are available as time goes on. When HDR becomes a thing, I look forward to him having the best HDR disc on the market as well.
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Old 02-02-2017, 07:07 AM
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I agree 100% that Ted's Lightspace calibration disc is the best disc in existence. It's actually pretty incredible on all of the general and specialized patterns that he provides to do a basic to the most complex of calibrations on your set. The disk has has a lot of color reproduction patterns to be able to test pre/post calibration which is very important. Also Ted provides incredible support and a wealth of information for any aspect of calibration no matter how complex.

I highly recommend it.

John
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Old 03-11-2017, 01:13 AM
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I've tested a lot of calibration discs such as AVSHD709, Burosch, S+M and some others but none of them is as good as Ted's Calibration Disc!

I can highly recommend the disk and Ted gave me some excellent advice on the best way to calibrate my LG 65 E6 OLED in combination with Lightspace and the eecolor. I use his disc everytime when I run a calibration. For $30 it's a piece of nothing and one of my best investments when it comes to my calibration gear.

So don't waste your time and get one example here
http://www.displaycalibrations.com/disk_copy_order.html
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Old 03-25-2017, 07:01 PM
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I recently purchased a LG B6 OLED and I'm finding it difficult to adjust picture settings to get a good picture, crushed blacks, green tint etc... If i decided to try calibrating it myself, what good low cost equipment / software would I need and are there any decent tutorials or guides online I can follow to learn how to do it?
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Old 03-27-2017, 06:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lforigno View Post
What is the better calibration disc... Disney WOW or the DVE disc??
For me...the best disk is using the Movie Cinema Mode setting that comes with your TV...or in other words none of the above. I've tried them all with different TVs and everything always came out much darker...to dark and yes I used the Movie setting to calibrate with unless you want to calibrate the other settings. I searched the internet all over for at least a picture of a calibrated TV and found maybe one or two at best so I had nothing to really go by and those pictures weren't near as dark as what I came up with after calibrating mine.


To be honest the Movie Cinema settings seems to be correct and matched every calibrated picture I saw but I am wondering how others are getting good results when I always ended up with a much darker picture that didn't match or look even close to what a calibrated one looks like. I can assume I can't improve on what the engineers and designers did who built my TV...they do it for a living...in the end you'll come up with a picture close to what the default Cinema setting is. I don't calibrate anymore and just use the TV default Movie Cinema Picture settings...so use that if you're not happy with what you come up with...good luck.
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Old 03-30-2017, 03:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunvsmoon View Post
I recently purchased a LG B6 OLED and I'm finding it difficult to adjust picture settings to get a good picture, crushed blacks, green tint etc... If i decided to try calibrating it myself, what good low cost equipment / software would I need and are there any decent tutorials or guides online I can follow to learn how to do it?
Hi, the best meter you can buy for it's money it's the X-Rite i1Display PRO, it's Luminance range limit is up to 1.000nits and the LG OLED's can reach up to 750nits max.

With i11Display PRO you will be able to calibrate all your PC monitors (unlimited number) also with the X-Rite i1Profiler that is coming with the retail version of the meter.

For calibration software for your LG, any calibration software you will choose can provide you nearly the same end results, adjusting your display internal calibration controls. The differences will be to layout interface/workflow.

The difference of free software vs. paid software is the customer support (and supported hardware). If you choose free software (like HCFR) there no guides (up-to-date), no manual and support will come from other users if you post a question to HCFR thread (and some experienced users may reply) or by searching already posted questions/topics.

Paid software has manual, guides, customer support via email/forum from each company.

About calibration software there free solutions, you can download:

1) HCFR from here with support forum topic: HCFR - Open source projector and display calibration software

2) The Free DPS version of LightSpace CMS can be used also with an i1Display PRO meter, there available to read various guides on the Light Illusion website.

The specific guide for use with LightSpace DPS is here.

But there is a lot of potentially useful/interesting info in the various guides on the website also.

Support forum topic: Free LightSpace DPS - Manual Display Calibration

There is a HCFR tutorial from a forum member here: The certainly not complete user guide to get to know and calibrate your TV

After selecting your calibration software, you have to find a calibration disk which had been created specifically for each software because there differences between calibration disk that can affect the final result when you will use not proper patterns for each measurement run.

You will playback the calibration disk from the source you use to playback your movies, to include to the adjustments you will make any player internal processing/colorspace conversions inaccuracies, to have your full video chain calibrated.

For improve your calibration knowledge, here are some useful links generally for calibration:

http://www.tlvexp.ca/

Video Calibration From The Inside - Volume I - 2nd Edition-1

http://chromapure.com/demos.asp

http://chromapure.com/ChromaPureManual.pdf

http://www.spectracal.com/downloads/...n%20How-To.pdf

http://calman.spectracal.com/user-guides.html

http://calman.spectracal.com/webinars.html

https://www.youtube.com/user/SpectraCal

http://lightillusion.com/why_calibrate.html

http://lightillusion.com/delta-e.html

http://lightillusion.com/manual_cali...ots_guide.html

Ted's LightSpace CMS Calibration Disk Free Version for Free Calibration Software: LightSpace DPS / CalMAN ColorChecker / HCFR
S/W: LightSpace CMS, SpaceMan ICC, SpaceMatch DCM, CalMAN 5, CalMAN RGB, ChromaPure, ControlCAL
V/P: eeColor 3D LUT Box - P/G: DVDO AVLab TPG
Meters: JETI Specbos 1211, Klein K-10A, i1PRO2, i1PRO, SpectraCAL C6, i1D3, C5
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Old 03-30-2017, 04:37 PM
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Wow thank you so much for the in-depth reply, really appreciate it!
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Old 04-01-2017, 09:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ConnecTEDDD View Post
Hi, the best meter you can buy for it's money it's the X-Rite i1Display PRO, it's Luminance range limit is up to 1.000nits and the LG OLED's can reach up to 750nits max.
I've bought a retail version of i1Display PRO to calibrate my LG OLED TV using DPS version of Lightspace CMS but it comes up with "Password-Locked [505]" error, Is there a workout around to use this software or do i need to use HCFR? I was hoping to follow the guide you linked for Lightspace as it seems the most beginner friendly guide I've looked at and I really dont know where to start with HCFR even though I've looked at links provided.
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Old 04-01-2017, 09:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunvsmoon View Post
I've bought a retail version of i1Display PRO to calibrate my LG OLED TV using DPS version of Lightspace CMS but it comes up with "Password-Locked [505]" error, Is there a workout around to use this software or do i need to use HCFR? I was hoping to follow the guide you linked for Lightspace as it seems the most beginner friendly guide I've looked at and I really dont know where to start with HCFR even though I've looked at links provided.
Hi, HCFR works natively with i1Display PRO Retail or OEM.

LightSpace works with i1Display PRO OEM only but using an alternative connection method it's working additionally with:

X-Rite i1Display PRO Retail
SpectraCAL C6
SpectraCAL C6-HDR
HP DreamColor
NEC SpectraSensor Pro
Quato Silver Haze 3
X-Rite ColorMukni Display.

Contact me there: http://www.displaycalibrations.com/contact_us.html

...to send you instructions about how you can use any of these meters using an alternative connection method with LightSpace.

Ted's LightSpace CMS Calibration Disk Free Version for Free Calibration Software: LightSpace DPS / CalMAN ColorChecker / HCFR
S/W: LightSpace CMS, SpaceMan ICC, SpaceMatch DCM, CalMAN 5, CalMAN RGB, ChromaPure, ControlCAL
V/P: eeColor 3D LUT Box - P/G: DVDO AVLab TPG
Meters: JETI Specbos 1211, Klein K-10A, i1PRO2, i1PRO, SpectraCAL C6, i1D3, C5
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Old Yesterday, 02:52 AM
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I dont have any test pattern discs yet, Could I use the test patterns from AVS HD 709 as media files and play them using my TV's built in media player or PS4? to start with?
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Old Today, 11:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by william273 View Post
For me...the best disk is using the Movie Cinema Mode setting that comes with your TV...or in other words none of the above. I've tried them all with different TVs and everything always came out much darker...to dark and yes I used the Movie setting to calibrate with unless you want to calibrate the other settings. I searched the internet all over for at least a picture of a calibrated TV and found maybe one or two at best so I had nothing to really go by and those pictures weren't near as dark as what I came up with after calibrating mine.

To be honest the Movie Cinema settings seems to be correct and matched every calibrated picture I saw but I am wondering how others are getting good results when I always ended up with a much darker picture that didn't match or look even close to what a calibrated one looks like. I can assume I can't improve on what the engineers and designers did who built my TV...they do it for a living...in the end you'll come up with a picture close to what the default Cinema setting is. I don't calibrate anymore and just use the TV default Movie Cinema Picture settings...so use that if you're not happy with what you come up with...good luck.
Hi, calibration don't have to do with what each user like or not, it's about following some standard movies are using during mastering.

Calibration don't have to do with what a user like or don't like, it's about to follow some industry standards. The closer you will be to that standards the closer picture with the director/DoP/Colorist wanted from you to see.

To see how your display performs and how close you are to the standard you need to use a meter/software. (using higher grade meters will provide even better results)

In a blind test using random people of all ages, the more people will like the dynamic mode more than the calibrated picture, because when the TV's are available at stores, the customers will select the more colorful and most impressive, more bright (all TV's will work at Store mode which is the worse mode available), this is how industry works, the manufacturers want more sales, so any mode it's consumer is TV is coming; all of them provide a very un-calibrated performance, just the Movie mode with usually Warm 2 color temp has the lowest errors from all other modes, but these errors are already a lot; so it's the less un-calibrated mode.

Using the Movie mode as baseline you can adjust the available controls using a calibration disk (without meter/software) to improve the factory default values (example of what you can do here) and for a complete calibration for more parametric adjustments you need to use a software/meter.

Any use having a calibration disk but applying wrong adjustments can provide worst results from the default ones or using a meter/software don't many anyone a calibrator, it needs some testing/reading/understanding/evaluations how stuff works to be able to provide better final results....so the user improves his skills...gaining experience from day-to-day.

Ted's LightSpace CMS Calibration Disk Free Version for Free Calibration Software: LightSpace DPS / CalMAN ColorChecker / HCFR
S/W: LightSpace CMS, SpaceMan ICC, SpaceMatch DCM, CalMAN 5, CalMAN RGB, ChromaPure, ControlCAL
V/P: eeColor 3D LUT Box - P/G: DVDO AVLab TPG
Meters: JETI Specbos 1211, Klein K-10A, i1PRO2, i1PRO, SpectraCAL C6, i1D3, C5
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Old Today, 11:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunvsmoon View Post
I dont have any test pattern discs yet, Could I use the test patterns from AVS HD 709 as media files and play them using my TV's built in media player or PS4? to start with?
Yes you can use AVSHD but take a look the notes below for HCFR or other software solutions with AVSHD.

It's better to use the calibration disk from the actual source you use for movie playback because between Player output or USB TV input...they can handle differently media files...this need some testing to see if you have agreement.

Grayscale with HCFR with AVSHD disk is accurate only if you have ticked the option ''use round down levels'' @ HCFR ''Preferences'' -> ''General'' Tab.



For ChromaPure/CalMAN or HCFR users which haven't clicked the above option, for DVE or AVSHD Disk; as you see to the picture below; it's grayscale RGB Triplets are not matching exact the levels the ChromaPure/CalMAN/HCFR's Engine expects for it's calculations. When you will use it to perform Grayscale calibration your gamma will be slight off to the mid/low-end range because DVE/AVSHD's Grayscale patterns are rounding fractional RGB codes down to the nearest integer. (AVSHD 2.0d use the same RGB Triplets as DVE).



The difference you will have @ gamma calculations for:

5% Gray = -19.22% Luminance error
10% Gray = -9.23% Luminance error
15% Gray = -5.82% Luminance error
20% Gray = -4.10% Luminance error
25% Gray = 3.07% Luminance error
30% Gray = 2.39% Luminance error
35% Gray = 1.90 % Luminance error
40% Gray = 1.53 % Luminance error

There thousand users which don't know that detail, so this post can help them to use proper settings or proper calibration disk for each software they use.

Ted's LightSpace CMS Calibration Disk Free Version for Free Calibration Software: LightSpace DPS / CalMAN ColorChecker / HCFR
S/W: LightSpace CMS, SpaceMan ICC, SpaceMatch DCM, CalMAN 5, CalMAN RGB, ChromaPure, ControlCAL
V/P: eeColor 3D LUT Box - P/G: DVDO AVLab TPG
Meters: JETI Specbos 1211, Klein K-10A, i1PRO2, i1PRO, SpectraCAL C6, i1D3, C5
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