RGB Deep Color Mode from PS3 on a Properly Calibrated TV - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 8 Old 03-15-2012, 01:38 PM - Thread Starter
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My TV was professionally calibrated using a PS3 as the source input.
RGB Range is set to Full on the PS3 and my TV supports it.
However I've been reading that RGB Full Range should be set to Limited.
If I set this to Limited, would it throw off my calibration?
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post #2 of 8 Old 03-15-2012, 02:06 PM
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Properly calibrated rgb full and rgb limited will produce the same results.


If its been calibrated at "full" you should stay with full
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post #3 of 8 Old 03-15-2012, 02:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lou99 View Post

My TV was professionally calibrated using a PS3 as the source input. RGB Deep Color mode on the PS3 is set to ON and my TV supports it. However I've been reading that Deep Color Mode should bet set to Limited (although I don't understand why). If I set this to Limited, would it throw off my calibration?

RGB Full Range: Limited vs. Full is different from Deep Color Output: Auto vs. Off.

If you TV was calibrated for PC levels use RGB Full if not then RGB Limited.

For Deep Color Output you can choose either, since it should not have any effect on the calibration either way.

http://manuals.playstation.net/docum...x_display.html

EDIT: Your calibrator should be able to explain what he did and answer your questions. Ask him directly.
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post #4 of 8 Old 03-15-2012, 02:19 PM
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Ok you mention you have other sources that will share settings.

Could you have the calibration redone?..

It may not matter really.

-brian
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post #5 of 8 Old 03-15-2012, 02:37 PM - Thread Starter
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Thanks Plastma. RGB Range: Full is what I was referring to.
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post #6 of 8 Old 03-15-2012, 07:43 PM
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Running RGB Full Range on the PS3 means you are running it with PC levels and not video levels, and for movies it will have to expand the range on it's own. While in theory you can see the same as you would from video levels, you will certainly lose light output, as you have to run the contrast level much lower to avoid crushing the 235-255 range of the spectrum, since that area now contains picture content.

Additionally, while content shouldn't have any information above 235, some material does and this will not be visible under any circumstances now, since your PS3 will stop displaying that material at 235 with a hard limit. If these settings are shared with other devices, then those will have shadows that are gray instead of black (since black is now 0 on your display instead of 16), and the bright whites won't be as bright as they could be, since peak white is now 255 instead of 235 as it would be on content.

My question is why would a professional use a PS3 and not a pattern generator for a source? They could use the PS3 to spot check the results, but it seems like a bad idea to use it as a source when having the wrong setting in them can mess up the output so much.

Chris Heinonen
Senior Editor, Secrets of Home Theater and High Fidelity, www.hometheaterhifi.com
Displays Editor, AnandTech.com
Contributor, HDGuru.com and Wirecutter.com
ISF Level II Certified Calibrator, ReferenceHomeTheater.com
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post #7 of 8 Old 03-15-2012, 07:51 PM - Thread Starter
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I think I'm wrong here.. The PS3 was used to test afterwards with a sample DVD. I think I'm ok here.... Perhaps I can verify with a test image. Do you have a easy way to do so?
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post #8 of 8 Old 03-15-2012, 09:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lou99 View Post

I think I'm wrong here.. The PS3 was used to test afterwards with a sample DVD. I think I'm ok here.... Perhaps I can verify with a test image. Do you have a easy way to do so?

Yes, use a DVD/BD with test patterns for setting brightness and contrast. If the TV was calibrated for video levels (like it should be in most cases), then you should see all detail above digital 16 (video black) and below 235 (video white). If it was calibrated for PC levels, you will see detail below 16 and above 235 as well (and the overall image will look washed out on devices using video levels).

**Use RGB Limited Range on the PS3 when doing this check.**
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