Calibrating Sonvy VPL-VW95ES - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 5 Old 11-25-2012, 12:54 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
SherazNJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 643
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 18
Hey guys,
Just ordered my Sony VPL-VW95es with StuidoTek 130 and the equipments will be installed in a complete light control basement (dark dark dark). I'm just a beginner and learned a lot on other threads (which helped me decide which projector to buy). Now comes the next challenge. Calibration.

Paying a professional doesn't like a good option as (according to my understanding) a projector should be calibrated after every 200 hours of usage.

So I want to do it by myself. Someone referred this http://www.curtpalme.com/ChromaPure_EyeOneDisplay3.shtm but it's rather expensive.

I'm trying to keep the cost on low side. Does someone who is going to put a max of 4 hours / week should buy it? Are there other options that can be utilized (cost effective)? Please note that I'm a complete newbie to calibration.
Thanks
SherazNJ is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 5 Old 11-25-2012, 02:52 PM - Thread Starter
Advanced Member
 
SherazNJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 643
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 18
Exploring more, I found out about X-Rite ColorMonki Display and X-Rte ColorMonki Display Pro

http://xritephoto.com/ph_product_overview.aspx?id=1513&catid=149&action=overview
https://xritephoto.com/ph_product_overview.aspx?id=1454&catid=109&action=overview

ColorMonki Display is $189 as of now and has a $35 rebate. Has anyone used it to calibrate projector? Do you like the result of it's calibration?
SherazNJ is offline  
post #3 of 5 Old 11-25-2012, 03:16 PM
AVS Special Member
 
airscapes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 4,579
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Liked: 107
I think you have your times confused.. you should not bother doing a complete calibration till you have 200 hours on the lamp and after that maybe every 500 -1000 hours.
Where are you in NJ, if near Philadelphia, I would be happy to calibrate your set as I have geared up to maintain my own projector. PM me if you are close by.
airscapes is online now  
post #4 of 5 Old 11-26-2012, 02:07 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Doug Blackburn's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: San Francisco - East Bay area
Posts: 3,453
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked: 222
There is no such thing as "keeping calibration cost on the low side" and still getting high-quality results. There is no shortcut to high-quality video calibration, especially for projection setups. You want to calibrate using a meter that will take readings off of your projection screen. Many of the lower-cost meters are designed for light-emitting flat-panel displays and they have to be turned towards the projector to read the light-beam of the projector. You cannot make readings from the screen with meters like that. So if you purchase a meter to calibrate your setup, you need to make sure that the meter works correctly with projection lamps (some less expensive meters can be OK with plasma but not with projection lamps or with LED or CCFL light used in LCD displays). So the 2 things you really need are: accuracy when measuring light from projection lamps AND the meter can be placed on a tripod 3 to 10 feet away from the screen so that it can take readings from the surface of the screen. The other issue you will have with lower-cost meters is that the filters used in the meter will change as they get older making the meter less accurate as it ages. There is no way to know how long it takes for the aging to be noticeable visually, but most sources say 3-5 years. That means you have to maintain the meter regularly to keep it accurate. BUT... many less-expensive meters have no calibration service so you cannot return the meter to the factory to be re-calibrated (probably with new filters). In that case, the best thing you could do would be to find a service provider like Spectracal who can use an expensive reference meter to create a custom correction table to use with your meter. However... that only works if you use software compatible with the provided correction table. Spectracal's software is called CalMAN and their characterization file will work with their software and may or may not work with other software options. It is for reasons like these that people often opt for professional calibration... the professional calibrator maintains the meter (typically a much better meter than most DIYers would use) and software, etc.

When it comes to keeping calibration costs low, there's a point where spending too little can actually cost you MORE over the long haul (because of having to replace a non-calibrateable meter every 3 to 5 years, for example, or because of the cost of having a new characterization file created every year or two to compensate for the aging of the meter). There's also the issue of software cost... technology changes over time and there are new video formats or features that require additions or changes to calibration software. Seems like every 1-2 years or so, most calibration software is updated so much that there's a charge to move-on to the next version that supports new features. So when it comes to video calibration... it's not like buying a set of wrenches for working on cars... you buy 1 set of wrenches and if you're an occasional home mechanic they can last a lifetime. Home video calibration is constantly evolving and changing. And what you buy today shifts over time and eventually gets obsolete. And if you ever change your projector, you may find that none of what you invested in originally is suitable for your next projector. You should understand all the issues before deciding whether to DIY or hire a professional calibrator.

"Movies is magic..." Van Dyke Parks
THX Certified Professional Video Calibration
ISF -- HAA -- www.dBtheatrical.com
Widescreen Review -- Home Theater & Sound
Doug Blackburn is offline  
post #5 of 5 Old 11-26-2012, 05:54 PM
Member
 
rpconrad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 72
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Blackburn View Post

There is no such thing as "keeping calibration cost on the low side" and still getting high-quality results. There is no shortcut to high-quality video calibration, especially for projection setups. You want to calibrate using a meter that will take readings off of your projection screen. Many of the lower-cost meters are designed for light-emitting flat-panel displays and they have to be turned towards the projector to read the light-beam of the projector. You cannot make readings from the screen with meters like that. So if you purchase a meter to calibrate your setup, you need to make sure that the meter works correctly with projection lamps (some less expensive meters can be OK with plasma but not with projection lamps or with LED or CCFL light used in LCD displays). So the 2 things you really need are: accuracy when measuring light from projection lamps AND the meter can be placed on a tripod 3 to 10 feet away from the screen so that it can take readings from the surface of the screen. The other issue you will have with lower-cost meters is that the filters used in the meter will change as they get older making the meter less accurate as it ages. There is no way to know how long it takes for the aging to be noticeable visually, but most sources say 3-5 years. That means you have to maintain the meter regularly to keep it accurate. BUT... many less-expensive meters have no calibration service so you cannot return the meter to the factory to be re-calibrated (probably with new filters). In that case, the best thing you could do would be to find a service provider like Spectracal who can use an expensive reference meter to create a custom correction table to use with your meter. However... that only works if you use software compatible with the provided correction table. Spectracal's software is called CalMAN and their characterization file will work with their software and may or may not work with other software options. It is for reasons like these that people often opt for professional calibration... the professional calibrator maintains the meter (typically a much better meter than most DIYers would use) and software, etc.
When it comes to keeping calibration costs low, there's a point where spending too little can actually cost you MORE over the long haul (because of having to replace a non-calibrateable meter every 3 to 5 years, for example, or because of the cost of having a new characterization file created every year or two to compensate for the aging of the meter). There's also the issue of software cost... technology changes over time and there are new video formats or features that require additions or changes to calibration software. Seems like every 1-2 years or so, most calibration software is updated so much that there's a charge to move-on to the next version that supports new features. So when it comes to video calibration... it's not like buying a set of wrenches for working on cars... you buy 1 set of wrenches and if you're an occasional home mechanic they can last a lifetime. Home video calibration is constantly evolving and changing. And what you buy today shifts over time and eventually gets obsolete. And if you ever change your projector, you may find that none of what you invested in originally is suitable for your next projector. You should understand all the issues before deciding whether to DIY or hire a professional calibrator.

What is the minimum requrement in your opinion regarding Software/Colorimeter model/etc. that one could achieve a good quality calibration (and self maintaining calibration as lamp degrades) without using a professional


Do you believe Calman 5 with the C6 or D3 meter (and perhaps a good spectro) would be adequate

I understand technology/the industry evolves quicking
rpconrad is offline  
Reply Display Calibration

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off