Where to leave errors 2 point tv - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 7 Old 10-26-2013, 03:19 PM - Thread Starter
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2 point grayscale tvs-on my plasma most of the tvs problems are in the midlevel and brighter screens as the darker screen programs usually looks good.It seems like its better too leave the errors in the darker screen levels, and get the bright and midlevels right.Right now I have a bit too much blue in the darkest parts(but I can brighten with brightness) in order too correct the yellow mid and bright tones where a lot of programs are. I also notice the bias does affect some brighter programs where I'm careful about having too much red and making sure blue is high enough too eliminate the yellow washed out abl programs.All my adjustments are made making sure to limit the overly shiny white as much as possible.wink.gif

Ps how someone getting a level gamma on my plasma seems highly unlikely.

The best I've gotten it is now and some bright midtones are leaning creamy pastel soft white (some are typical blue).reason is too take the high contrast away on the high contrast stuff and balance it out a little mostly by getting blue gain down as much as possible.darks are very slight blue color..
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post #2 of 7 Old 10-27-2013, 01:38 PM
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The fact is, you don't know what errors you have or don't have because you don't have a meter. Nobody can help you with this question because your perceptions of what you are seeing are very likely to be inaccurate because human vision is EASILY fooled.. Even if you know every way that human vision can be fooled, you cannot compensate for it or make it look accurate.

And there is NO way to "hide" errors. Leaving worse errors at the dark end of the luminance scale risks having every star field in every movie looking green or red or some other color. That' VERY obvious and VERY annoying, so you cannot say you are better off with larger errors at the dark end of the luminance range. Anything you see at high luminance ranges is HIGHLY susceptible to human vision errors and what you are CERTAIN is a yellow error could easily be caused by too much blue at higher or lower steps. But you'll never see the blue error unless it is very severe. Instead, you see a yellow error... though if you have a large visible blue error, adjacent steps are highly likely to look yellow even if they are "perfect".

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post #3 of 7 Old 10-27-2013, 05:32 PM - Thread Starter
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Ive always thought a tv looks good if the brights are a bit yellow and the darks are a bit blue(personal preference).Also If it's too blue/green in high contrast screens then the screen will go too warm when the abl kicks in and washes and yellows everything..I'm getting it more stable in the bright screens by keeping everything yellow in the brights..Even lowering blue gain 1 number can increase the yellow quite a bit as you know....For setting the contrast and temperature for the brights you need the different shades of bright whites and the shiny luminous whites on the screen at the same time ,as those screens can look bad on mine if not set well...
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post #4 of 7 Old 10-27-2013, 08:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vic12345 View Post

Ive always thought a tv looks good if the brights are a bit yellow and the darks are a bit blue(personal preference).Also If it's too blue/green in high contrast screens then the screen will go too warm when the abl kicks in and washes and yellows everything..I'm getting it more stable in the bright screens by keeping everything yellow in the brights..Even lowering blue gain 1 number can increase the yellow quite a bit as you know....For setting the contrast and temperature for the brights you need the different shades of bright whites and the shiny luminous whites on the screen at the same time ,as those screens can look bad on mine if not set well...

I was wondering, is English your second language?
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post #5 of 7 Old 10-28-2013, 01:59 PM
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Since you aren't doing calibration, just guessing at settings and don't even like accurate images, you really should not be posting in the Calibration forum.

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post #6 of 7 Old 10-29-2013, 01:42 AM - Thread Starter
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I'm just throwing out some stuff if it helped anyone or is interested.From a different viewpoint.I guess it's not working.

Are you suppose too put the comma after wondering?
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post #7 of 7 Old 10-29-2013, 04:19 PM
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It's not working because this thread exists for people who are using software and a meter to perform calibrations of their TVs. These people understand that when they see yellow or blue in an images, what they are seeing is quite possibly not real. To avoid their eyes from being tricked, they understand the value calibrating video displays with a meter and software. This thread is for them to ask questions about the process. Since you are not using that process, it is simply not appropriate to be posting guesswork here.

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