PLEASE help me calibrate my tv - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
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post #1 of 10 Old 02-09-2017, 10:20 AM - Thread Starter
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PLEASE help me calibrate my tv

I have a Vizio e420i Smart TV. I know I'll never be able to get SD DVDs to look as good on it as they did on my old CRT set, but I'm still going to try as best as I can. Right now I have 2 SIMA color correctors hooked up to it. Lots of trial and error has resulted in something that looks really goid, but I still think I can do better. There is still some very minor color casting, issues with black and white levels, and colors that somehow look both faded and oversaturated at the same time. Of course some of these issues could just be in the source material that I'm watching, but it's really really hard to say for sure. Some of the SD DVDs I'm referring to are homemade ones that were ripped from vhs using an old Hotronic TBC - I may have had the chroma set too high because when watching on my smart tv they had lots of "flickering" artifacts. I somehow fixed it, but I'm not exactly sure what I did, and I don't want to do anything that would bring the flickering back. I just want to go into the factory settings and smooth out all these issues as much as I can without causing any new problems, someone PLEASE help me
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post #2 of 10 Old 02-09-2017, 11:14 AM
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Originally Posted by DaneClark View Post
I have a Vizio e420i Smart TV. I know I'll never be able to get SD DVDs to look as good on it as they did on my old CRT set, but I'm still going to try as best as I can. Right now I have 2 SIMA color correctors hooked up to it. Lots of trial and error has resulted in something that looks really goid [ good? ], but I still think I can do better. There is still some very minor color casting, issues with black and white levels, and colors that somehow look both faded and oversaturated at the same time. Of course some of these issues could just be in the source material that I'm watching, but it's really really hard to say for sure. Some of the SD DVDs I'm referring to are homemade ones that were ripped from vhs using an old Hotronic TBC - I may have had the chroma set too high because when watching on my smart tv they had lots of "flickering" artifacts. I somehow fixed it, but I'm not exactly sure what I did, and I don't want to do anything that would bring the flickering back. I just want to go into the factory settings and smooth out all these issues as much as I can without causing any new problems, someone PLEASE help me
Welcome to the forum. You need to calibrate your TV with objective, reference, test signals. A decent setup/calibration program on DVD would be suitable in your case. Some titles worthy of consideration include: the free "GetGray" download from this forum, "Disney WOW," "Digital Video Essentials," or an HD test program on Blu-ray Disc if you have a BD player. There is a free download in HD on this forum: AVS HD 709 - Blu-ray & MP4 Calibration .

Once the TV is adjusted with standardized signals, you can turn your attention to the mess you have from the homemade DVDs. It's likely no one can suggest what to do with the rest of your setup without being on site. Even then, you are asking for a result that satisfies you, not anyone else. Distorting the TV to compensate for deficiencies and/or distortions from the program, and/or related equipment, will not be, by definition, "display calibration."

Have you considered using a CRT TV to watch your homemade DVDs? Anymore, many folks will give them away to anyone that will pick them up.
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post #3 of 10 Old 02-13-2017, 10:11 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by GeorgeAB View Post
Distorting the TV to compensate for deficiencies and/or distortions from the program, and/or related equipment, will not be, by definition, "display calibration.".


If it's not "display calibration", then what would you call it?
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post #4 of 10 Old 02-13-2017, 10:39 AM
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Originally Posted by DaneClark View Post
If it's not "display calibration", then what would you call it?
If you're not correcting to reference standards with a calibrated light meter then at best it's an adjustment. Accessing the Service Menu in most cases is not recommended unless you're a service engineer because it is very easy to alter the settings to the point that pq is greatly diminished and you may not be able to correct it.
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post #5 of 10 Old 02-13-2017, 10:46 AM
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Originally Posted by DaneClark View Post
If it's not "display calibration", then what would you call it?
It's called "basic setup".

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post #6 of 10 Old 02-13-2017, 12:26 PM
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If it's not "display calibration", then what would you call it?
The world of video is a standards-governed medium, technology, and industry. Video displays are designed to work within certain published standards, engineering guidelines, and recommended practices. Display calibration practices and procedures work within that context. It is commonly understood that the best way to start setting up a video system is to calibrate the display with reference signals, then subsequent adjustments can be made to the program signal chain.

If your homemade video program looks bad on a calibrated display, and more reliable sources still look good, you can try to adjust the settings for one input on the display to accommodate the poorly mastered homemade program. That would leave you other inputs on the display for watching your other signal sources. Some displays use global settings for all inputs. Adjust one, and it affects all the others.

The "factory settings" in the user adjustable menus can be changed as desired without serious consequence. "Service mode" settings should not be altered if not factory trained and authorized. A misstep could disable the display.
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post #7 of 10 Old Yesterday, 01:54 PM - Thread Starter
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I can't use multiple inputs - the red-yellow--white cables are the only ones that SD DVDS look good on and my tv only has one connection for it.
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post #8 of 10 Old Today, 10:35 AM
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I think what he means, and please correct me if I am wrong, is that once you have calibrated the TV properly, and you know that your source is calibrated correctly as well, the picture is only as good as the content is. So, once you have calibrated the display to where you want in using test imagery, etc., the set itself is calibrated to what you like. If the content is a bit washed out, or has color issues, by correcting this using your settings on the TV, you are effectively making it worse for any other content that you will play. What you could try and do is calibrate 2 of the choices on the TV(such as movie and custom), use proper test patterns for one of the settings, and this is what you would use for pretty much everything except your home made DVD's, then you use the other and use your home made DVD's as a reference for color. It's a bit more work, but it's the best solution I can think of at the moment.
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post #9 of 10 Old Today, 10:45 AM
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I can't use multiple inputs - the red-yellow--white cables are the only ones that SD DVDS look good on and my tv only has one connection for it.
The red and white RCA jacks are for right and left audio signals. Your yellow RCA jack is for composite video signals. What other video connections do your DVD player and TV have available?
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post #10 of 10 Old Today, 11:24 AM
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I think what he means, and please correct me if I am wrong, is that once you have calibrated the TV properly, and you know that your source is calibrated correctly as well, the picture is only as good as the content is. So, once you have calibrated the display to where you want in using test imagery, etc., the set itself is calibrated to what you like. If the content is a bit washed out, or has color issues, by correcting this using your settings on the TV, you are effectively making it worse for any other content that you will play. What you could try and do is calibrate 2 of the choices on the TV(such as movie and custom), use proper test patterns for one of the settings, and this is what you would use for pretty much everything except your home made DVD's, then you use the other and use your home made DVD's as a reference for color. It's a bit more work, but it's the best solution I can think of at the moment.
Here is one of several educational "sticky" threads from the top of the opening page of this section of the forum:

'Display Calibration: Root Fundamentals'
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1021933

Adjusting a TV for personal preference is not really video display calibration. The objective in display calibration is to come as close as possible to video industry standards and best practices.
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