Sharpness = zero? - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 60 Old 10-28-2005, 09:55 AM - Thread Starter
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I have seen a lot of people that post their calibration specs have set their sharpness to ZERO. If I even start to approach that the picture is VERY soft and blury and the lines have no definition. What gives here?
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post #2 of 60 Old 10-28-2005, 10:03 AM
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Greetings

Sharpness control is different on different TV brands. That's all.

The proper way to set sharpness is to use a test pattern and look at the artificial edging the control creates in the image. REduce it until the edging goes away. This could be at 0 ... or it could be at 50% or 90% ... it varies.

On Some TVs ... sharpness controls are mere placebos and do nothing.

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post #3 of 60 Old 10-28-2005, 10:42 AM
 
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yeah, in a lot of analog displays, the sharpness is a gain circuit for HF in the video signal, and so to maintain the original image you want the sort of freq-response flat. Pushing sharpness through the roof emphasizes HF and rings, lowering it too much rolls things off and you lose definition in the image. This is why you should use a sharpness pattern to set this.

However, on many newer digital displays, it's a digital sharpening processing function, and not a simple analog circuit, but the damaging results of oversharpening still exist. However, usually placement at "0" means that you're not processing the image at all with sharpening filters, so you have the original base image, in essence setting it to "0" removes sharpness processing from the video signal to maintain the integrity of the input signal. However, in the previous example, setting it to zero does not remove the sharpness circuit at all, but rather moves it to it's lowest setting, which is likely not the neutral setting. Hope that explains why different settings make sense for different kinds of displays!
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post #4 of 60 Old 10-28-2005, 11:46 AM
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Real world examples: on one end of the spectrum, a Panasonic CRT-RP set's Sharpness is really still too high even when set to zero. And on the other end of the spectrum, a Toshiba CRT-RP set is very different...drop the Sharpness too low and the image suffers signifcantly. Most other brands fall somewhere in-between.
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post #5 of 60 Old 10-28-2005, 12:09 PM
 
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I wish that I had the option of reducing the sharpness on my Philips CRT (34PW850H), but that control is disabled when using the component inputs. Does anyone know of a way to do this, maybe through the service menu?
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post #6 of 60 Old 10-28-2005, 02:56 PM
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Almost every TV I have "calibrated" looked best w/ minimal ringing at 0 or close to 0.
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post #7 of 60 Old 10-28-2005, 03:18 PM
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My MT700 sharpness control only goes down to zero. In order to get rid of EE (edge enhancement), I had to set my DVD player Sharpness control to -2 (component connection, 480p output).

- Claus {non-Santa model}
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post #8 of 60 Old 01-03-2006, 01:33 PM
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I didn't see anyone mention that a lot of displays have "Zero" as the midpoint setting in the user menu. As in, a lot of displays associate a number with the scale setting, and sometimes the midpoint level is listed as zero - anything above is a positve, anything below negative. So zero isn't always neccesarily referring to the lowest setting (on some occasions).

A calibrater above mentioned that every display he's worked on calibrates sharpness to zero or close to zero. My Sony KP57WS520 doesn't even come close to looking right at zero. This is a CRT RP display. I thought that every set is different, meaning that not all displays should calibrate to zero.

Anyone here with a Sony CRT RP? What does everyone else have for their sharpness setting with this? I find it's somewhat difficult calibrating that setting with DVE, considering that my Sony RP has that slight "right ringing" that has aflicted a lot of RP's out there.

What do the rest of you have for sharpness with this Sony?

Thank you.
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post #9 of 60 Old 01-03-2006, 03:00 PM
 
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If you have a CRT tube display, HD or conventional, you may have to have the G2 flyback "focus" checked. If anything should be called a SHARPNESS CONTROL(!) this is the baby. I have taken the backs off many a set and adjusted focus, resulting in a much lower setting required for "Sharpness" than was needed previously. My relatives and friends tell me they feel like they are really watching the movies, even when it's just the 6 o'clock news on a 10 year old 20" set.

Once the set is properly focused, you can really take advantage of AVIA or VE's sharpness setting patterns.

regards,
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post #10 of 60 Old 01-03-2006, 08:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill97Z
I have seen a lot of people that post their calibration specs have set their sharpness to ZERO. If I even start to approach that the picture is VERY soft and blury and the lines have no definition. What gives here?
Dunno if this'll work well for anybody else, but it seems to work well for progressive HTPC modes via DVI on my Sony 34XBR800 CRT.

View from a distance or with eyes unfocused so the lines blur together into fields of grey, and adjust Sharpness until the 4 squares look the same shade of grey. May want to disable scanning velocity modulation (SVM) if you have that ability as well. The FINE pattern has 1-pixel width lines, and the COARSE pattern has 2-pixel width lines. The ANTIALIASED pattern (as the name implies) contains intermediate lines of grey to smooth the transition between the light and dark lines. Which works best may depend on the resolution and/or type of display you're using. If the display can't resolve enough detail for the Fine pattern at some resolutions, then try the Coarse or Antialiased pattern.

All three patterns give the same Sharpness reading on my CRT at 480p*. For higher-definition HDTV-derived progressive modes like 1280x540p or 1440x540p* I use the Coarse and Antialiased pattern because my CRT doesn't seem to resolve enough horizontal detail for the Fine pattern at those resolutions. The Sharpness readings are pretty much identical though regardless of resolution on my CRT. I've only tried these with bona-fide progressive modes, so I don't know how they'd work with either interlaced, or converted signals (eg, displays which convert 720p to 1080i). See also the post later in the thread re 2170P-3/SYSM. These particular patterns only seem to work if SYSM is set to 2 or 3 on my Sony TV.

(*Some special hoops had to be jumped through on my Sony CRT to get it to actually display 33.75kHz-540p progressively. And my 480p modes are also 33.75kHz HD-derived signals rather than the usual 31.5kHz.)

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post #11 of 60 Old 01-05-2006, 12:23 AM
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Claus,
you discribe exactly what i found out. Zero is mostly too sharp and ringing appears.
On the other hand, when i set up my projector during dealer demo correct, most of the customer say, that the image looks to soft.
So perfect sharpness is for us and not the mass:-)

Best
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post #12 of 60 Old 01-05-2006, 02:14 AM
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Another set of patterns basically the same as above but with palette changed from 0-127 to 16-127 to conform to an unexpanded video palette (not that it should really matter).

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post #13 of 60 Old 01-05-2006, 07:46 AM
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Quote:
you discribe exactly what i found out. Zero is mostly too sharp and ringing appears.
On the other hand, when i set up my projector during dealer demo correct, most of the customer say, that the image looks to soft.
So perfect sharpness is for us and not the mass:-)
I was under the impression that ringing was an incorrectable fault with RP CRT displays. I have a slight ringing that appears to the right of objects that occurs regardless of what the sharpness level is. I know it is possible to reduce this through the SM, but not possible to get rid of it.

Part of optimizing the sharpness level means getting rid of the edge enhancements in the SM. If you lower the sharpness and still see ringing, it could mean that there is some enhancement still activated in the SM. With my display, i will get ringing no matter what, since it's a well-documented issue with these types of RP's.

I wonder if it is possible to lower sharpness to zero, and then somehow improve focus so that the picture is soft AND detailed. Most folks i've talked to however, who have had ISF's, have their sharpness still adjusted to @ the 35% range.

Lowering sharpness, in order to get a "pure" picture is something i've only recently seen the rewarding value in. I realized this after i placed a dvd in my laptop dvd-rom. I noticed how perfectly smooth and soft, yet detailed the image was on there. I understand this is a different display than CRT, but it just shows you what a near-perfect image should look like. I've noticed that seeing a pure image is a far more immersive viewing experience, simply because things look far more realistic through the screen.

I have tried lowering various edge-enhancements in the SM, but i'm not sure if i have found every one yet. SVM is off already, but i also had to lower VMLV to zero. If anyone knows how to remove the rest of the enhancements i would love to know.
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post #14 of 60 Old 01-09-2006, 02:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyG
Real world examples: on one end of the spectrum, a Panasonic CRT-RP set's Sharpness is really still too high even when set to zero. And on the other end of the spectrum, a Toshiba CRT-RP set is very different...drop the Sharpness too low and the image suffers signifcantly. Most other brands fall somewhere in-between.
so anyone know of fixes, perhaps in the service menu, for Panasonic or Toshiba CRT RPTVs?

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post #15 of 60 Old 01-10-2006, 11:15 AM
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Fixes for what, exactly?? Are we still talking about sharpness?

One tip for the Panasonics is to be sure that Noise Reduction (NR) is set to ON. As strange as it might sound, this actually turns off edge enhancement. The reason is that edge enhancement makes specs of noise more visible as it enhances their edges. So, when you turn NR ON, it stops doing this, making noise less visible. A needle pulse pattern will demonstrate this instantly.

The Toshibas have sub-Sharpness controls in the service menu for most input types.
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post #16 of 60 Old 01-10-2006, 01:21 PM
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Hey JohnnyG, any tips for Samsung DLP's and sharpness? I usually keep it around 10 for personal preference, but since you mention the trick with Panasonic (NR "On"), I was wondering if you had suggestions for DLP's. Thanks!
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post #17 of 60 Old 01-10-2006, 03:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyG
Fixes for what, exactly?? Are we still talking about sharpness?

One tip for the Panasonics is to be sure that Noise Reduction (NR) is set to ON. As strange as it might sound, this actually turns off edge enhancement. The reason is that edge enhancement makes specs of noise more visible as it enhances their edges. So, when you turn NR ON, it stops doing this, making noise less visible. A needle pulse pattern will demonstrate this instantly.

The Toshibas have sub-Sharpness controls in the service menu for most input types.
Yeah, i was referring to any sort of edge enhancement. I'll have to give that NR thing a try. I've always just tried to turn off all processing, but this seems to be a unique situation.

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post #18 of 60 Old 01-10-2006, 06:11 PM
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I personally can't stand the slightest bit of edge enhancement via the sharpness control. I only use the "Pro" mode with shaprnes at zero on my Sony KD-30XS955. It's the only mode that truly has no edge enhancement when the settings are zeroed out.
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post #19 of 60 Old 01-11-2006, 11:22 AM
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Quote:
One tip for the Panasonics is to be sure that Noise Reduction (NR) is set to ON
I have a Sony with this Noise Reduction feature. I was under the impression this feature removed noise by taking away important information to the picture, which is why i thought it was supposed to be "off."

Which SM item affects the noise reduction?

I believe i have removed all edge enhancements in the menu. Lowering the VMLV value to zero did the MOST in removing the enhancements and smoothening out the picture.

Anyone else find that when the picture is completely free of noise, being as smooth as it can get, that your eyes strain a little bit more to focus on the image?
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post #20 of 60 Old 01-12-2006, 09:42 AM
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The Panasonic is - as far as I know - a unique case. In reality, it doesn't seem to have a real noise reduction circuit at all.

Still, on all brands, I usually 'play' with any noise reduction menu options to see what visible effect they might have on test patterns.
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post #21 of 60 Old 01-13-2006, 12:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Napoleon D
I have a slight ringing that appears to the right of objects that occurs regardless of what the sharpness level is.
Sounds like overshoot.

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post #22 of 60 Old 01-14-2006, 12:29 PM
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Oh well, I gave it the ole college try. If you're the adventurous type, then in addition to the basic Sharpness and SVM controls, there may also be some other edge-filtering controls in the service mode which could perhaps be used to tweak away some of the overshoot/ringing. Some of these appear to be located in the 2170P-3 group on my D/V Sony CRT.

2170P-3/ SYSM, SHF0, F1LV and LTLV seem to have the most effect on these issues on my TV. There appears to be a simple Sharpness offset control: SHOF (different than SHF0) there as well. You can probably see the effect of these edge-filtering controls most easily in a progressive mode with a pattern like the one attached, which has a grid of alternating sharp and soft (ie anti-aliased) dark lines on a light background, or using Sharpness patterns from DVE or AVIA. Excessive edge-enhancement will show as ringing on the vertical lines and/or make the soft vertical lines too sharp (raise and lower F1LV or LTLV and you'll see what I mean). Per this link, some ringing/overshoot is probably normal on the sharp vertical lines, but there should be little or no ringing on the softer/AA'd vertical lines.

These 2170P-3 controls are all signal, input and picture mode sensitive btw, and some of the other edge-filtering controls in this category (which I didn't really touch) appear to be interdependent, so unravelling and tweaking them for all possible combinations of signals, inputs and picture modes would probably take quite a bit work. (Not really an issue for me since I run everything via DVI @ 33.75khz in Pro picture mode.) There may also be more info on these controls in this thread.

The above controls will influence the behavior of the basic User/Sharpness control as well (one reason the SHOF sharpness offset may come in handy). With 2170P-3/SYSM set to 0 or 1, the Sharpness patterns in Post #10 and #12 don't seem to work because the Sharpness control does not vary the brightness of one set of grey squares relative to the other anymore.

Also, I didn't mess with any scanning velocity modulation controls in the service menu, since turning Clear Edge VM off in the User Menu seemed to disable all SVM in the Pro picture mode on my set.

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post #23 of 60 Old 01-14-2006, 12:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Napoleon D
Anyone else find that when the picture is completely free of noise, being as smooth as it can get, that your eyes strain a little bit more to focus on the image?
FWIW, the edgier picture on my Trinitron TV before tweaking various controls was more a strain on my eyes than the purer and IMO more detailed-looking post-adjustment picture. So I was glad to get rid of most of the edge-filtering. YMMV though, and I suppose it takes a certain arrogance to believe one can really improve on factory settings without having the same grasp on the TV's imaging paradigm that the mfr or a good calibrator would have.

Another thing you might look at though are some of the focusing and convergence controls, if the less-enhanced picture looks too soft.

Viewing distance could be a factor as well. A little more enhancement might be preferable at greater distances.

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post #24 of 60 Old 01-16-2006, 03:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADU
Disabling 2170P-3/SYSM*, SHF0, F1LV and LTLV seems to eliminate most of the ringing/overshoot on my TV. There appears to be a simple Sharpness offset control: SHOF (different than SHF0) there as well.
I did extensive experimentation over the summer and fall with my similar Sony 36XS955, and I have detailed the results as well as I can in a chart I have prepared as a PDF document, attached here to post #707.

Much of what ADU has said is true, but I caution that some of the different filters/enhancers applied to the video signal cannot be "eliminated" but only optimized. In particular, 2170P-3/SYSM is significant changed by the three settings of 0/1, 2, and 3; but 3 isn't "off." I.e. if you choose SYSM = 3, minimum effect seems to be with the Sharpness slider at "Min," but if you choose 2 (as I generally do because of its refined effect), "neutral" is with the Sharpness slider at about 12-15. Lower than that *softens* the image.

Further, a couple of these filters that can enhance edge sharpness appear to me not to be simple high-frequency boost (like an audio trebel control) but to be working in the *time* domain, deriving edge information from the video, taking a derivative of it, and adding it back to the video, leading, lagging, or centered on the edge in question. This woud produce, if well done, a desirable unsharp-mask effect, as one can do to digital stills in Photoshop or the like.

My goal has been to (1) understand the variious filters and enhancements; (2) determine how to control them; (3) figure out how to set up a really neutral-looking display, with stunning detail but without ringing or overshoot; and (4) what controls to use for improving second-rate video.

Much of (1) and (2) are answered in the chart mentioned above.

(3) Was fairly easy to achieve, given the complete image-neutrality of certain DVDs, neither soft nor sharpened. Monsters, Inc and the AVIA resolution targets are great examples.

For (4), we're stuck with the Sharpness control, unless you reconfigure a couple of the Picture modes for your own purposes -- which is what I have done.

The abovementioned chart is *very* specific to the Sony DA-4 chassis, common to many of these related XS, HS, and XBR CRT sets. Note that there are two unobvious locations in the DA-4's processing where sharpening is applied -- and well-hidden: in 3D-COMB and 2103-1. The sharpening in 2103-1 is especially obnoxious, in my opinion, and I eliminate it, period!

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post #25 of 60 Old 01-16-2006, 03:31 PM
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For those to whom DVD is a very important source of video, and who can play DVDs on their computer, there is a way to determine *exactly* what edge and texture detail looks like on the DVD, without processing.

On Mac or PC, you can play the DVD with an open-source program called VLC, from videolan.org here. Set the Preferences for Video > Source aspect ratio to 720:480. The on-screen presentation will now be pixel-accurate, if not perfectly proportioned -- DVD pixels aren't square and your monitor's are.

See attached "FrameGrab.png" for a sample from the DVD and "Incred 39'47.jpg" for a photo of my screen of nearly the same frame from The Incredibles (freeze-frame, interlaced mode). View the frame-grab at 400% to see the pixel detail. Player = Panasonic S97 at 480i thru component cables, no enhancements.
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post #26 of 60 Old 01-16-2006, 03:46 PM
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To demonstrate what I mean about the high-quality images in Monsters, Inc, here are a couple of computer frame-grabs (cropped) from the DVD, pixel-accurate. View at something like 400%. The time location on each frame is in the filename as h'mm'ss. If you have sharpness, scaling, or sampling problems in the video chain, it will stand out like a sore thunb!

In 33'46, the wall switch is the key element.

In 33'40, it's the eyelashes and hair. The high-contrast edges in the eyes are great, too.

In 1'22'25, it's everything! High- and low-contrast edges abound, including tiny text.

Monsters has managed to antialias most everything while retaining all the information that *implies* more detail than is actually there. You think you see eyelashes, and then when you look closely, they're just mushy blobs! But it was done so right, and the object of "tuning" the TV is to preserve all of the expertise that went into digitizing this gorgeous film. The *hair* is absolutely miraculous! (No photographic processes here!)
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post #27 of 60 Old 01-16-2006, 08:28 PM
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Great tips as usual Ken. Thanks.

3D-COMB and 2103-1 have no effect on my DVI input, but good to know they're there if I decide to do some analog again.

And I see what you mean about SYSM. The effects of that control are easy to see with bright details on a dark background, like for example the yellow text on this page (viewed in the usual AVS Dark Theater color scheme). Although I see a little more overshoot with SYSM set to 2, it definitely makes bright text and details clearer, and better-defined, especially at higher resolutions. On closer inspection, the 0 or 1 SYSM setting (which appear to be the same) causes what seems to be a sort of an undershoot effect. I'm a little hesitant to use a computer screen with no AA as my only gauge for how these should be adjusted though. As you mention above, some of these settings seem to work more in the temporal realm. I'll have to play some more with the SYSM parameter to see what feels best on average video content. I suspect you may be right though that 2 would be the best-looking setting for most folks.

If you have SYSM set to 2 (or 3), then it might worth trying the patterns in Post #10 or #12 above for basic Sharpness adjustment. Seems to produce pretty good results for me. YMMV.

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post #28 of 60 Old 01-16-2006, 11:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADU
I'm a little hesitant to use a computer screen with no AA as my only gauge for how these should be adjusted though.
Yup. That's the way I now feel about the Memory Stick method, too. Although it's very instructive to insert such perfect patterns into the TV that way, it does not duplicate most of the signal paths I actually use for watching TV, e.g. DVD thru component, and regular ol' SD analog cable. I think HD is the nearest thing to it, as it looks like they share the same signal path (according to what is alleged in the Sony block diagram -- but that has known errors!).

HD is also the easiest to set up -- no 3D-COMB or 2103-1 settings to dirty things up! I have it configured for *no* sharpness enhancement except for the SYSM=2 setting plus whatever Sharpness setting looks best (25-30), and a very little extreme-fine-detail enhancement in the MID5 table. No F1LV or any of the coarse stuff in VMF0 or LTLV. Gorgeous! One tiny notch more MID5 enhancement for 720p over 1080i.

Another really great choice for evaluating a DVD is (with my setup) the Panasonic S97 DVD player doing 480p thru HDMI to my 36XS955. The resolution pattern on the AVIA disk is *perfectly* reproduced, with no artifacts -- no ringing, no edge enhancement -- at a specific setting of Sharpness using (I think) SYSM = 2. But having tuned it for such "perfection," I didn't like the way it reproduced actual DVDs! At a normal viewing distance of, um, feet nearly touching the TV, the best DVDs look most neutral and realistic when the AVIA pattern shows a bit of sharpening *without* ringing -- which is what SYSM=2 is capable of. Go figure. That's why I am really comparing what a DVD contains (visible on the computer) with what I see on the TV. Resolution patterns are great for the education -- and then one has to move on to the real-world stuff.

Further, I prefer whatever Panasonic S97 is doing with the component outputs at 480i. A great DVD looks nearly photographic, like good film, showing textures and details that seem to exceed what DVD should be capable of. If I do 480p thru HDMI, the picture has a slightly artificial quality compared to the other -- although if you simply watched 480p-HDMI all the time, you'd likely be thrilled.

In case you're wondering: Using the Panasonic to upsample to 720p or 1080i is a complete strike-out. Much mushier picture than 480i, with the finest detail unrecoverable. A similar problem exists with 480p over component, except there's an additional ugly-factor. I don't know if it's the player or the TV, but it doesn't really matter. Nope. If I absolutely require the competent Faroudja chip to do interlacing, 480p over HDMI is excellent. Otherwise it's 480i over component, and the Sony does the heavy lifting.

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post #29 of 60 Old 01-18-2006, 12:11 AM
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HD is also the easiest to set up -- no 3D-COMB or 2103-1 settings to dirty things up! I have it configured for *no* sharpness enhancement except for the SYSM=2 setting plus whatever Sharpness setting looks best (25-30), and a very little extreme-fine-detail enhancement in the MID5 table. No F1LV or any of the coarse stuff in VMF0 or LTLV. Gorgeous! One tiny notch more MID5 enhancement for 720p over 1080i.
Sounds sweet!
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Further, I prefer whatever Panasonic S97 is doing with the component outputs at 480i. A great DVD looks nearly photographic, like good film, showing textures and details that seem to exceed what DVD should be capable of. If I do 480p thru HDMI, the picture has a slightly artificial quality compared to the other -- although if you simply watched 480p-HDMI all the time, you'd likely be thrilled.

In case you're wondering: Using the Panasonic to upsample to 720p or 1080i is a complete strike-out. Much mushier picture than 480i, with the finest detail unrecoverable. A similar problem exists with 480p over component, except there's an additional ugly-factor. I don't know if it's the player or the TV, but it doesn't really matter. Nope. If I absolutely require the competent Faroudja chip to do interlacing, 480p over HDMI is excellent. Otherwise it's 480i over component, and the Sony does the heavy lifting.
Couple things... not that the S97 falls into this category, but the couple of "up-converting" players I tried had mediocre to downright abyssmal PQ quality via DVI/HDMI compared to my PC. How they manage to muck-up such a comparitively simple process so badly is beyond me. So I wouldn't necessarily rely on such sources as an indicator of what may be possible in terms of scaling and PQ via digital inputs with different hardware. Whether different/better external up-conversion is worth pursuing depends alot on the display's internal capabilities though, as I'm sure you know.

Re artificial qualities... this is something we've probably touched on before, and whether something like this would be workable/beneficial/advisable/safe on different/later models which ought to have better processing to begin with is certainly questionable/doubtful... but I think (and others might disagree) that the 33.75kHz patch, which by all appearances rerouted 33.75khz signals from both component & DVI past MID/DRC processing likely eliminating a couple D/A conversions and also allowing progressive display of 540p, probably helped some on my 34XBR800. [phew] As a result of the patch though, for better or worse all MID/DRC functionality is lost on 1080i, making it even less practical for the average user. Thought I'd mention it though since you brought up block diagrams.

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post #30 of 60 Old 01-18-2006, 11:53 PM
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but I think (and others might disagree) that the 33.75kHz patch, which by all appearances rerouted 33.75khz signals from both component & DVI past MID/DRC processing likely eliminating a couple D/A conversions and also allowing progressive display of 540p, probably helped some on my 34XBR800.
Since I acquired this 36XS955 only last spring, it came as quite a revelation to me to recently read your archived thread on signal processing: You've sorta been going through what I've been this last 10 months. If I had read your 2003 thread, it would have pointed me to certain parameters and shortened my research. Who knew?

Would you please indicate the post # in the thread describing the patch? Or do you mean simply the HDPT switch in the OP group? And I hope I can encourage you to peruse that chart in #707 and try a few of the settings I have found so useful.

A couple comments on that: I have found that, since SD broadcast is so coarse, one can devise groups of settings that are equally satisfactory with SYSM=2 and with SYSM=3. The subtleties of difference are completely lost on such program material -- but, most emphatically, not on great DVD material. That's a whole different class!

And, unexpectedly, carefully configured VM (ClearEdge velocity modulation) works to *eliminate* most of the small bit of irreducible overshoot/ringing thru the component inputs. I'm not finding it as much of a clear benefit on HD material -- but not ugly, either. Hard to pin down what the image change is. On DVD material, I like it. But it's a good thing it's so easy to turn off with the remote. (Wish it, along with gamma, were separate buttons! I've never tried something like a Harmony remote.)

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