PS3 unable to play BDMV folder on BD-R - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 04-13-2013, 04:20 AM - Thread Starter
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I'm having an issue trying to play back a BD-R on my PS3, the PS3 reads the BD-R fine, shows up as a Blu-Ray disc with a BDMV file/folder, then when I select it, it attempts to play, shows the PS3 wave background (like it's going back to the XMB), then gives me the error "The Video Cannot Be Played, Error 80029941" or something along those lines

I started a thread on the PlayStation forums here and didn't get much help, I narrowed it down to an encoding or compatibility issue, though the BD-R in question does work fine in standalone set top Blu-Ray players

All professionally stamped Blu-Rays work fine on the PS3

Any reason why a BD-R would play fine in a standalone player but not on the PS3?
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post #2 of 9 Old 04-13-2013, 11:25 AM
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That code is a disc read issue. The format you used may not be compatible with PS3. Here's the list from the official Sony Support page:

Quote:
The PS3 supports the following movie and video file formats:

Disc Formats
DVD Video with either region [1] or [ALL] 1
DVD-R/-RW, DVD+R/+RW 1, 3
Blu-ray Discs™ (BD) containing video content with region code [A] 5, 7, 8, 10
BD-ROM, BD-R, BD-RE 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10

MPEG-1 (MPEG Audio Layer 2)
MPEG-2 PS (MPEG2 Audio Layer 2, AAC LC, AC3 (Dolby Digital), LPCM)
MPEG-2 TS (MPEG2 Audio Layer 2) AVCHD (.m2ts / .mts)

Memory Stick™ Video Formats
MPEG-4 SP (AAC LC)
H.264/MPEG-4 AVC Main Profile (AAC LC)

AVI
Motion JPEG (Linear PCM)
Motion JPEG (u-Law)

MP4 File Format
H.264/MPEG-4 AVC High Profile (AAC LC)

DivX and VC-1 (WMV)6
Requires PS3 system software version 2.10 or higher

Good luck.

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post #3 of 9 Old 04-14-2013, 10:42 AM - Thread Starter
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When it says "BD-ROM, BD-R, BD-RE 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10" what do the numbers mean, and how do I check to see if my BD-R is one of them?
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post #4 of 9 Old 04-16-2013, 10:12 PM
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Well, what kind of BD-R is it? Is it a commercial disc? Is it something you made? It is highly possible that if it's not a commercial disc, that the format of the actual video file is incorrect to BD specs.
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post #5 of 9 Old 04-18-2013, 02:19 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sitlet View Post

Well, what kind of BD-R is it? Is it a commercial disc? Is it something you made? It is highly possible that if it's not a commercial disc, that the format of the actual video file is incorrect to BD specs.
I think I made it pretty clear that I made it, I said that all professionally stamped Blu-Rays play fine on the PS3 and by mentioning BD-R I mean "Blu-Ray Recordable", professionally stamped commercial Blu-Rays are considered BD-ROM

This BDMV folder was ripped from a demo disc, so it should be in a format compatible with Blu-Ray (unless it was re-encoded in the ripping process), and like I said, the disc is playable on standalone set top players, just not the PS3 in particular
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post #6 of 9 Old 04-22-2013, 08:32 AM
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I think I made it pretty clear that I made it, I said that all professionally stamped Blu-Rays play fine on the PS3 and by mentioning BD-R I mean "Blu-Ray Recordable", professionally stamped commercial Blu-Rays are considered BD-ROM

Actually, you never said YOU made it. I just wanted to know if you made it yourself or if someone else did. And I know the difference between a BD-R and a BD-ROM.
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This BDMV folder was ripped from a demo disc, so it should be in a format compatible with Blu-Ray (unless it was re-encoded in the ripping process), and like I said, the disc is playable on standalone set top players, just not the PS3 in particular

Well we're getting somewhere. How did you rip the video? What software? And after you ripped it, how did you author the disc you burned? The fact that it plays in other players doesn't tell us much. Most commercial BD players will play almost any kind of video file, whether it's been authored correctly or not. The PS3 however is very picky.
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post #7 of 9 Old 04-24-2013, 02:10 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sitlet View Post

Actually, you never said YOU made it. I just wanted to know if you made it yourself or if someone else did. And I know the difference between a BD-R and a BD-ROM.
You never said anything of the sort, you asked if I made the disc or if the disc was made "professionally", there is no such thing as a professionally burned BD-R, as professionally created Blu-Ray media (or disc media for that matter) is never burned, it's stamped

By mentioning that the media in question is a BD-R, automatically means it was done by me (or possibly a friend somebody I know personally)
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Originally Posted by sitlet View Post

Well we're getting somewhere. How did you rip the video? What software? And after you ripped it, how did you author the disc you burned? The fact that it plays in other players doesn't tell us much. Most commercial BD players will play almost any kind of video file, whether it's been authored correctly or not. The PS3 however is very picky.
I personally didn't rip the video myself so I am unsure of what software was used to rip the video, all I know is that the video was designed to be ready to burn

As for how it was burned, that I explained on my thread on the playstation forums (which I linked to in my first post), I just burned the BDMV folder as a data disc to a BD-R using the integrated burning software in OS X (on a MacBook Pro)
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post #8 of 9 Old 04-29-2013, 09:27 AM
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there is no such thing as a professionally burned BD-R, as professionally created Blu-Ray media (or disc media for that matter) is never burned, it's stamped

The definition of "professional" can mean many things. I work for a professional production company, and burn hundreds of BD-R's a month for clients. They are "professional."
Quote:
all I know is that the video was designed to be ready to burn

ANY video is technically designed to be burned. You can burn a video to a disc in many ways, that doesn't mean it fits the specifications of the media/playback device. If the resolution/framerate/authoring is off, it won't playback. Again, the PS3 is very picky about these standards, while most set-top blu-ray players won't have a problem.
Quote:
I just burned the BDMV folder as a data disc to a BD-R

This may be your problem. BD-R's need to be authored, and have a specific file structure. This link may give you some more information:

http://www.videohelp.com/hd#filestruct
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post #9 of 9 Old 04-30-2013, 02:36 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sitlet View Post

The definition of "professional" can mean many things. I work for a professional production company, and burn hundreds of BD-R's a month for clients. They are "professional."
When I think of "professional", I think of "commercial", and all commercial media (commercial videos/movies, commercial software, commercial audio CDs, etc.) are stamped, not burned

The only exception is on-site disc media (say from a kiosk) where a computer located on-site burns the media to disc

I will say that I did have a cheap digital camcorder once that came with a driver that was burned to CD rather than stamped, but due to the cheapness of the camcorder, I wouldn't consider it "professional"
Quote:
Originally Posted by sitlet View Post

ANY video is technically designed to be burned. You can burn a video to a disc in many ways, that doesn't mean it fits the specifications of the media/playback device. If the resolution/framerate/authoring is off, it won't playback. Again, the PS3 is very picky about these standards, while most set-top blu-ray players won't have a problem.
Not exactly (and this goes for your next comment), not all videos are designed to be burned (for example AVI, WMV, MP4, DIVX, etc.), they have to be authored before they are burned, while most DVD/Blu-Ray authoring programs also burn the video to disc after being authored, there are DVD/Blu-Ray authoring programs that don't burn the video to disc, but instead save the video as an ISO file, or even the video files/folders themselves, on the hard drive, then you can burn the video files/folders to DVD/Blu-Ray as a data disc (I have done this with DVD VOB/IFO/BUP files many times without issues)

Quote:
Originally Posted by sitlet View Post

This may be your problem. BD-R's need to be authored, and have a specific file structure. This link may give you some more information:

http://www.videohelp.com/hd#filestruct
Like I said above, authoring and burning video media are two different things, it is possible to author a DVD/Blu-Ray video but save it instead of burn it, though very few DVD/Blu-Ray authoring programs allow you to do this, then you can burn the video files/folders, with the proper file structure and format, to a DVD or Blu-Ray as a data disc

The video in question already have the proper file structure for Blu-Ray, and the video files (.m2ts) are formatted for Blu-Ray, and includes SSIF files (3D files) formatted for Blu-Ray 3D, so there should be no need to author the video



Something tells me it has to do with either the formatting of the disc (OS X's Disk Utility says it's UDF, but it doesn't say anything on what version of UDF), the type of BD-R media I am using, or that maybe everything is correct, and it's just the PS3 doesn't want to read it anyway (this isn't the first time I had issues with Sony products)
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