Help mphfrom77 get a pc for multiple uses - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 86 Old 06-14-2013, 12:25 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
mphfrom77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: northern KY
Posts: 3,685
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked: 205
Hi guys, I'm mphfrom77.

I am clueless about computers.

I want a desktop pc for these uses in order of priority:

1) I want to create my own music

-My young brother is incredibly talented when it comes to music and I want to join with him in messing around with producing some music. This will be all new to me as I am no musician, but I have nothing to lose to might as well play around with it.
- I figure this is pretty simple, and doesn't require much from a computer.

2) I want to create videos

-This will also be pretty new to me, though I do have some experience with making gaming videos using a extremely junky laptop and some software (Cyberlink PowerDirector 10) that I bought for $60. It's almost impossible doing video creation on my p.o.s. laptop.
-I'm not sure how deep I will go into this but I want to try to have a decent amount of capability from my pc...within reason and budget

3) I want to play games

-I've never gamed on a pc, but I'd like to try it out
-bf4 will probably be the the main title the first year of pc ownership I would imagine

4) I'd like to be able to record my pc gameplay (and console if possible)

-I'm not sure but I get the idea that it is very taxing on a pc to be able to do both at the same time...meaning play a pc game like BF4 and record that gameplay all on the same pc
-Is this possible and what could I do to make this possible

5) Kind of an afterthought but could I make this pc do some htpc type things?

-I haven't measured but I think in the end, the run from my pc location to my avr / tv will be no more than 40ft
-So would I be able to run an hdmi cable to my avr (Denon 4311ci) so that I could use the pc for some htpc stuff
-I've never considered this as necessary before but if it would work and would be fairly simple, and advantageous then I'm all for it.

6) Other basic computer stuff


Well there you go. If there is something else you think I should plan on using a new pc for let me know as I may be out of the loop (like one friend told me he thought one of the best uses of a pc was to make a dedicated htpc...but that was different from what I am looking to do).

My budget is pretty low, and I just purchase a new tv last weekend so I probably am not going to be ready right away. I might be two months out, but I wan t (and on some levels...need) to do something as soon as I can. I have nothing to use for this, so I would need every single piece on down to a screen and a desk. But including the screen it would be nice to stay under $1300 (I'll worry about a desk separately.)

I've had people say it might be best (since I am so new to all things computer) to just buy a prebuilt system. Others say I will be fine if I put together a pc myself. I'm not sure what I should do.

One thing I need to do in the mean time is just learn about computers a little if I could. I just don't understand what makes up a pc. I don't understand the terminology...(like CPU for example...I don't know what that means...what it does). I also am no good with software. Just clueless. I know I would need some type of OS, but I don't know anything about OS. I guess some games and things work better on certain OS better than others?

If anyone has any good links to help me understand all of this, that might be the most helpful advice right of the bat.

But I am also looking for the best plan of attack here. It would be nice to increase the strength of this pc over time, but I don't know if that is possible.

I'm not sure even what questions I should be asking you guys. If there are any points I am missing or something let me know.

Thanks
mphfrom77 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 86 Old 06-16-2013, 08:18 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
mphfrom77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: northern KY
Posts: 3,685
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked: 205
I've just started reading this thread that americangunner started a couple months ago where he seeks advice for pc building vs buying...http://www.avsforum.com/t/1468827/buying-vs-building

I figure a lot of advice I am seeking can be found there.
mphfrom77 is offline  
post #3 of 86 Old 06-17-2013, 10:27 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
mphfrom77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: northern KY
Posts: 3,685
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked: 205
I have only read one page of american gunner's thread I linked above...but I will real the entire thread in the next couple days, as I am sure it will be very beneficial to me.

I basically got sidetracked reading different things about a pc build like I am trying here. I seem to have picked up quite a bit...not hard to do since I knew nothing. Just trying to get up to speed here.

I found some site called pcpartpicker.com. Seemed like a decent site for me to try piece together a system, just to get an understanding of how it all stacks up in the end to a final price.

Well, with me trying to do both video editing and gaming, the final price shot to the moon.

But I honestly have no idea what I put together. I mainly did it to get an understanding on the price / value side of things. I just am not far enough along to fully understand the differences between higher and lower tier parts. I feel I have started to get an idea, though.

I'll show you guys what I accidentally came up with.

Maybe you guys could tell me what I would need immediately vs what I could put off later (so as to not be hit with such a high initial cost).

Irregardless, I need to find a what to trim off like $1400 from that final price of $2700 (I'm guessing I left off a couple items so it may have been even higher).

If I could get to $1300-$1400 (including monitor and peripherals), that would be nice.

(For example, I really haven't done research on how two of the same graphics cards compare to one better graphics card, but I will. A friend suggested I buy one now and in a year or two when they go down in price, buy a 2nd one. I initially thought that aybe the EVGA GeForce GTX 680 4GB Video Card might represent a good value, I think at $475 after rebate, but maybe it is just not that great of a deal for me.)

I kind of get the idea that any old graphics card might do me fine for gaming for a couple years...but for the video editing side of things I might want to get a nicer cpu? So maybe stick with that new I7.

Regardless, this initial "price play through" is way out of my league. I'll definitely look into going with a lesser piece across the board. I'm so damn clueless.

For what it's worth I tried to build the same exact system on ibuypower.com and it seemed to come out like $300-400 higher, but I really couldn't get everything exactly the same.

Anyways, thanks again for advice, but I have a long way to go to get an understanding (and to get the cash...lol:p).

Any suggestions to cut this cost in half? ... http://pcpartpicker.com/p/17nwc
mphfrom77 is offline  
post #4 of 86 Old 06-17-2013, 11:42 AM
AVS Special Member
 
DaverJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 6,622
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Liked: 394
Quote:
Originally Posted by mphfrom77 View Post


Any suggestions to cut this cost in half? ... http://pcpartpicker.com/p/17nwc

There's plenty around here smarter at PC building than I am, but I can tell at first glance that build is way overkill:

  • I don't think you need to go liquid for the CPU cooler unless you want to do serious overclocking. The Cooler Master 212 EVO is popular - I just put one in myself and it works great and is quiet.
  • $260 for a motherboard? Don't need that to go that high end.
  • You don't need a sound card or a network adapter - those are built into most motherboards these days.
  • A GTX680 is no longer a wise videocard investment. Maybe consider the 7 series, like a 770.
  • The gaming keyboard is a luxury that would probably be wise to save for later.


Good luck!
mphfrom77 likes this.

Console gamers curious/interested in PC gaming? Click here.
DaverJ is online now  
post #5 of 86 Old 06-17-2013, 06:25 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
mphfrom77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: northern KY
Posts: 3,685
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked: 205
Ok thanks.

Thinking about it today, I figured the gaming keyboard, and possibly mouse could be things that I could put off initially. I really don't know about the mouse though, as it is only $60 I think.

I also thought that maybe I could pick up a cheap monitor off of Craigslist or something. Maybe I could go real cheap for a few months, then have that as a second monitor later. Though I'm not sure I need that. Guess I don't understand why people use more than one monitor sometimes.

But it seems as if all the stuff you listed we're cut back, I could save maybe $400-$500 or something. Not sure about the video card though.
mphfrom77 is offline  
post #6 of 86 Old 06-17-2013, 06:42 PM
 
darklordjames's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 7,909
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 93
"Any suggestions to cut this cost in half?"

If you are serious about encoding video, then stick with the i7. If video is going to be more of a toy, then save $100 by moving to the i5 4670. They'll do exactly the same for you in games.

The motherboard shouldn't cost any more than $120. Everything important in terms of performance is handled by the CPU. It's been that way ever since we moved the memory controller off the chipset and on to the CPU. MSI makes a Z87 board for $110 that looks great at first glance. Dropping down to H87 for the chipset looks to get you a good board for $80.

The liquid cooler is a pointless cost. The free Intel heatsink works fine. If you really want something a bit better, then the $30 Hyper212 is great.

Move to 2x8GB for the memory, and save a bit by dropping to 1833 or 1600. That will let you move to 32GB later without throwing ram away. RAM speed also doesn't have that much of an effect on a system outside of integrated graphics performance.

Move to a GTX 770 for $400, or drop down to a GTX 660 Ti or vanilla GTX 660. As a point of reference, I find it easy to regularly hit 1080p/60 on my $190 GTX 660.

24" 1080p monitors are $180. If you are going to spend $400 on a 120hz monitor, you'd probably be a lot better served by moving up in resolution or size instead. 3D is kinda cool, 120hz 2D is kinda cool, but neither carry the impact of size and resolution.

There are great cases for less than $100.

Windows 8. Same price, much better optimization for SSDs.

Drop to a 120GB SSD for your boot drive, but add a second 2TB platter drive for mirroring. Data redundancy is more important than being able to install 10 games on your SSD instead of three.

Throw away the sound card and network card.

Drop to a 650W power supply for a GTX 770 or a 550W for a GTX 660. $80-100 will buy you a great power supply.

There is a lot of cash that you can cut out of that build without sacrificing your experience.
mphfrom77 likes this.
darklordjames is offline  
post #7 of 86 Old 06-17-2013, 06:57 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
bd2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 10,410
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 199 Post(s)
Liked: 1376
http://pcpartpicker.com/p/17z50

This is about as close as I could get without really compromising anything.

Although I think you'd need an additional part for the gaming capture....someone else can help you out on that, I'm not really that familiar.

You can drop the SSD entirely if you really need to get under $1300. It's a nice luxury, but its not a necessity.

There are ways to get it much lower while still accomplishing your goals, you'd mostly have to sacrifice some gaming performance....pretty much everything else is basic stuff that can be accomplished just fine on much lesser hardware. Its only when getting into gaming that you need to start picking out higher end parts.
mphfrom77 likes this.

Steam/PSN/Xbox Live: Darius510
bd2003 is online now  
post #8 of 86 Old 06-17-2013, 08:22 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
mphfrom77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: northern KY
Posts: 3,685
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked: 205
Thanks guys.

I'm a definitely confused with the different sizes of cases...what that means to me initially and then down the road in case I need to upgrade some pieces. Also curious on how the different sizes affect the heat inside the case.

Can anybody touch on that?

I'm sure I can research it but I need to get an understanding on what the benefits are if running two similar graphics cards are, and when it is a good idea to do that.

I'm assuming I should go ahead get a power supply that could handle that, and any possible overclocking in the future. Or is there such a thing as too much power?

I'm also extremely clueless on motherboards, so that is another topic I need to research.
mphfrom77 is offline  
post #9 of 86 Old 06-17-2013, 11:32 PM
 
darklordjames's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 7,909
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 93
"Although I think you'd need an additional part for the gaming capture"

Nah, that will all be software based. Essentially you end up using one of your CPU cores to handle h264 encodes for streaming to twitch.tv or the like. I'm sure Twitch offers software to handle it for you, or at worst you just load your games through Origin which has native Twitch support.


"I'm a definitely confused with the different sizes of cases...what that means to me initially and then down the road in case I need to upgrade some pieces. Also curious on how the different sizes affect the heat inside the case."

Case size has mild impact on heat. It's really all about airflow design and keeping heat at acceptable levels. These things will put up with a lot higher temperatures than you would expect, so it isn't that much of a concern. ATX are big motherboards and cases. mATX are smaller, but only in that they give you four expansion slots instead of seven. Given that you are likely to only ever drop in a video card and wireless card, two slots feed the vast majority of uses you will ever need.

The greatest thing to pay attention to in cases is that it is physically deep enough to allow for the video card that you want to put in to it. In example, I fell in to a $200 GTX 680. I then promptly realized that the card is nigh on 12" long, while both my tower and desktop cases only allow for around a 10.5" card length. I didn't feel like swapping out my case, so I instead dropped in a much more reasonably sized GTX 660 at 9" or so.

Otherwise you just want to look for niceties like screwless features and easy access to hard drive bays and the like.


"what the benefits are if running two similar graphics cards are, and when it is a good idea to do that."

Hardly ever. For the most part it is simply a better idea to buy a single faster card than a pair of slower cards. As an idea SLI/Crossfire is nice, but in practice it is still a bit fiddly and doesn't scale as well as it should. Unless you are doing a pair of top-end cards on day one, don't ever plan for SLI. By the time a single card is too slow, it then makes sense to just throw the old one out and buy a new-generation card to put in it's place instead of trying to bolt on more old technology to extend the life of your original card.

Example: Buy a GTX 570 in 2011. Now in 2013 it's too slow. Instead of scrounging up a used GTX 570 to add to the system, which will still be too slow, just toss it out and drop in a single new GTX 770.

Dropping SLI support from your desired feature list keeps motherboard cost down as well, meaning you can spend that money somewhere else on day one.
mphfrom77 likes this.
darklordjames is offline  
post #10 of 86 Old 06-17-2013, 11:35 PM
 
darklordjames's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 7,909
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 93
"I'm also extremely clueless on motherboards, so that is another topic I need to research."

Motherboards really comes down to "Does it have all the holes that I want it to have so I can plug in my stuff?" and variance in chipset features. I'm not the best person to talk to about Intel chipsets, but between the H87 and Z87, it looks like you pretty much just lose some overclocking features by going for the cheaper H87 boards.
mphfrom77 likes this.
darklordjames is offline  
post #11 of 86 Old 06-18-2013, 03:46 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
bd2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 10,410
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 199 Post(s)
Liked: 1376
Quote:
Originally Posted by mphfrom77 View Post

Thanks guys.

I'm a definitely confused with the different sizes of cases...what that means to me initially and then down the road in case I need to upgrade some pieces. Also curious on how the different sizes affect the heat inside the case. Can anybody touch on that? I'm also extremely clueless on motherboards, so that is another topic I need to research.

There are three basic sizes of motherboards - ATX, MicroATX, and MiniITX. There's no difference in performance, just the number of ports/slots for GPUs, RAM, etc....The smaller the motherboard, the smaller the case....not really much more to it than that. I'm personally not a fan of dual GPUs, I dont see the need unless your budget is much, much higher. I went with MicroATX for you, since I dunno how deep you want to get in the future, but I personally use MiniITX.
Quote:
I'm sure I can research it but I need to get an understanding on what the benefits are if running two similar graphics cards are, and when it is a good idea to do that.

It's really only a good idea if you're hardcore into PC gaming, and you cant find a single card that's enough for you. The $160 card I mentioned is plenty fast to play games at 1080p and 60FPS most of the time....there are ways to really push the limits though, although someone so new to this really doesnt need to consider it yet.
Quote:
I'm assuming I should go ahead get a power supply that could handle that, and any possible overclocking in the future. Or is there such a thing as too much power?

600W is already quite a bit of power....you could get away with 400ish on the build I gave you, even overclocked. Bigger power supplies are going to be more expensive, and less efficient at lower power draws....on idle, you're rarely burning more than 50W. Its only once you're gaming when it starts to push 200W or so.....you want some headroom though. The main thing is just to have enough power for your graphics card(s) - just about any single GPU is going to be fine at 600W.
mphfrom77 likes this.

Steam/PSN/Xbox Live: Darius510
bd2003 is online now  
post #12 of 86 Old 06-18-2013, 07:21 AM
AVS Special Member
 
DaverJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 6,622
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Liked: 394
mphfrom77 - these guys are giving good advice.

You might want to consider building a bargain PC like they are suggesting. Once built, start using it and see if you are lacking in any area, then you can become obsessive about upgrading. smile.gif

A couple thoughts:

-prioritize how much gaming is a part of your build. If gaming is a low to medium priority, then go with the smaller case, lower power supply and a mid-range nVidia card like the 650ti Boost or the 660 ti Boost. These smaller PCs are handy if you want to transport the PC around to different areas of the home, like moving from the office to the den to hook up to a TV. And you can still do some very impressive gaming with those video cards mentioned if you don't mind turning down some of the graphics options. Believe it or not, even at lower graphical settings, games will still be visually very impressive at 1080p 60 frames per second - better than gaming on the current-gen game machines like the Xbox 360 or PS3.

-If gaming priority is high to very high, then consider going for a bigger case and a slightly more power supper supply that can fit the nVidia series 7 cards like the GTX 770. This will future-proof you a bit for gaming. The downside is a bigger, heavier PC that is less portable (if that's important) and the expense, but graphically you'll be playing modern games at a detail level that should rival the next-gen gaming consoles like the Xbox One or the PS4.

-I would encourage getting an SSD! At least put your OS on a 128gig SSD, but be aware SSDs don't like to be near full, so 256gig isn't a bad idea either. Then get a 2TB regular hard drive for all your programs, media, movies, pictures, files, games, etc.. If you restart your computer often, you'll be so glad you have the speed of boot-up time of an SSD.

-DLJ is right, Windows 8 64-bit is worth considering. There's a lot of hate on the internet over Win8, so many hard-cord computer nerds push to sticking with 64-bit Win7. But I think they just don't like the new metro-styling of Windows 8, which can be completely bypassed with a $5 program called "Start8" by Stardock. This program gives usability equal to Win7 with the advantages of the more modern behind-the-scenes workings of Win8.

If this thread has been helpful, show some love to people posting by clicking the "thumbs up" on the post you like. wink.gif
mphfrom77 likes this.

Console gamers curious/interested in PC gaming? Click here.
DaverJ is online now  
post #13 of 86 Old 06-18-2013, 09:44 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
bd2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 10,410
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 199 Post(s)
Liked: 1376
Yeah, I agree on all fronts. In fact, I might even go as far as to say skip the video card from the start, and use the integrated video for a few days. PC gaming is very different from console gaming, and it's not for everyone. You have to be prepared to constantly tweak, and running it in your living room may be more hassle than you're willing to deal with. The integrated video will be enough to get the games up and running at mediocre settings. It all depends on what's more important to you - the quality of the game visuals, or the ease of getting into it.

Right before the launch of the new consoles is kind of the worst time to get into PC gaming. Especially with so many next gen games running at 1080p and/or 60fps. I'm not sure that I'll keep my PC up to date if the consoles can sustain that. It sounds to me like your interest is primarily in BF, and they've already confirmed 60fps for that....so you'd be putting a lot of money forward for something of questionable benefit for you. If you were to drop the gaming requirement, you could easily save enough money on the rig to buy either of the new consoles (which have built in recording), and the PC you'd build or buy with the remaining would do everything else you listed just as well.

Also, given your priorities and your experience level with content creation, you should seriously consider a Mac.
mphfrom77 likes this.

Steam/PSN/Xbox Live: Darius510
bd2003 is online now  
post #14 of 86 Old 06-18-2013, 12:04 PM
 
darklordjames's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 7,909
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 93
"but be aware SSDs don't like to be near full"

When partitioning your SSD, leave around 20% of it unpartitioned. A 120GB SSD should have a 100GB partition on it, with the rest unused. That way you can use as much of the 100GB as you want without hitting any of the slowdown issues that you can have with a full drive. The drive firmware will still use that extra empty space for maintenance, but it be transparent to the user.
DaverJ and mphfrom77 like this.
darklordjames is offline  
post #15 of 86 Old 06-18-2013, 02:02 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
mphfrom77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: northern KY
Posts: 3,685
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked: 205
Thanks again fellas.

I've only owned my home for less than three years. My "ht" area is in a finished basement. I have a separate closed off room down there that I am not using. That is where I am going to setup this computer. I could run an hdmi easily to my avr/tv through an unfinished part of the basement since that would be the closest run anyways, "as the crow flys".

Ouch, there is the first Mac vote. My young brother that I mentioned above has one, and that is what he uses to create music. I really haven't looked into them as I assumed they would be too expensive for me. I've always heard they are best for content creation.

Maybe someone could suggest a Mac model that would be comparable in specs to what I am looking for. But would that rule out gaming?

I just figured gaming would just come along with a new pc a minimal extra cost.
mphfrom77 is offline  
post #16 of 86 Old 06-18-2013, 02:16 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
bd2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 10,410
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 199 Post(s)
Liked: 1376
Quote:
Originally Posted by mphfrom77 View Post

Thanks again fellas.

I've only owned my home for less than three years. My "ht" area is in a finished basement. I have a separate closed off room down there that I am not using. That is where I am going to setup this computer. I could run an hdmi easily to my avr/tv through an unfinished part of the basement since that would be the closest run anyways, "as the crow flys".

Ouch, there is the first Mac vote. My young brother that I mentioned above has one, and that is what he uses to create music. I really haven't looked into them as I assumed they would be too expensive for me. I've always heard they are best for content creation.

Maybe someone could suggest a Mac model that would be comparable in specs to what I am looking for. But would that rule out gaming?

I just figured gaming would just come along with a new pc a minimal extra cost.

Yeah, it's actually quite the opposite - other than gaming or professional level content creation, budget PCs do the job just fine. And they'll play games too, but more at a current gen level of quality/performance.

Really when it comes to macs on the desktop, there's only two choices - a Mac mini and an iMac. iMac is an all in one, mini expects you to bring your own monitor, input devices, etc. Some of the more popular PC games, like blizzard games, have Mac ports. And you can always install windows and dual boot, apple makes that pretty easy. But neither is expandable to any real degree, and their gaming performance is mediocre at best for the price you pay. But for someone who isn't really that into computers, puts the highest priority on entry level content creation, and might play the occasional game or two....it's kind of hard for me to recommend anything else to be honest. You're basically their target market.

A Mac mini starts at like $600ish, but you'll need at least another 300ish for the monitor and accessories. The iMac is like $1300, but it comes with everything you need in the box. You're absolutely paying a premium in terms of price/performance for a Mac vs an equivalent specced PC, but it comes with everything you need to get started on content creation, and they're really well designed computers in general.
DaverJ and mphfrom77 like this.

Steam/PSN/Xbox Live: Darius510
bd2003 is online now  
post #17 of 86 Old 06-18-2013, 04:41 PM
AVS Special Member
 
htskinner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,162
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
I vote toward's bd's build with a few changes.
A name brand full atx case (the difference is quite noticeable, not just in looks but feel) and at least a bigger mobo. Drop the SSD down to a ~60g and use it strictly as a boot drive and for programs you use a lot, nothing else.
I'd just stick with an optical drive unless you have immediate plans to burn bluray. Pick up a nice mouse (i bought my current g500 for $35) and just a basic KB until you feel like dropping the money. Switch up the monitor, there are 2-3 acers that have 5 eggs in the 22-24" range and are ~$160. Switch the speakers to a headset, are $150 sets nice? Yes. Are $40-50 sets fine if you aren't a god? Yes. And they'll come with an easy to use mic. I'll look more later
mphfrom77 likes this.
htskinner is offline  
post #18 of 86 Old 06-18-2013, 07:42 PM
 
darklordjames's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 7,909
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 93
http://techreport.com/review/24954/amd-a10-6800k-and-a10-6700-richland-apus-reviewed

Someone has finally done a proper review on AMD's FX-6350. As a $140, high-clock, six-core CPU, it is a super-compelling offering. You can pair it up with a $60-80 motherboard, putting you at $200 for that core. It isn't the quickest at video rendering, but for gaming it puts you within spitting distance of the fastest things you can buy, for comparatively dirt cheap.
mphfrom77 likes this.
darklordjames is offline  
post #19 of 86 Old 06-18-2013, 08:14 PM
AVS Special Member
 
DaverJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 6,622
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Liked: 394
I forgot to mention - if the OP is just getting into PC gaming, the Radeon line of videocards can save some money, but I would still push for spending a little extra on nVidia. The GeForce drivers are usually pretty good and up-to-date as new games are released (this year's Tomb Raider launch not withstanding rolleyes.gif ), but they also have software called the "GeForce Experience" which is a good way to optimize game settings for your configuration of graphics card, CPU and memory, and keep the driver current. It's not perfect, but it is a good way to get close to optimal setup without much fuss.

bd's suggestion of a Mac is worth considering for content creation, and they are very fine computers and worth the investment if you can afford it. But gaming on a Mac is very limited, especially compared to a PC. I don't know what kind of HTPC-type stuff can be done on a Mac either, except AppleTV, but I think it does exist.

If the OP wants to dive into the "build a PC" hobby, and doesn't mind doing a little research like he is here, watching videos on YouTube about how to put it all together, and putting up with the occasional odd configuration snafu, both hardware and software, then most of us will agree it's an interesting and rewarding pastime.
mphfrom77 likes this.

Console gamers curious/interested in PC gaming? Click here.
DaverJ is online now  
post #20 of 86 Old 06-19-2013, 12:50 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Spanglo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Diego
Posts: 1,497
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 44 Post(s)
Liked: 185
Mph you're getting some great advice in this thread.

Since pc gaming is low priority, and because you'll probably be doing all your gaming on your new PS4, then I suggest building a nice htpc.

You can use one of the AMD chips that darklordjames mentioned, and have yourself a quality build for well under 700 that will run cool using the 65W A10 cpu, with low power draw because of the low cpu wattage and no video card, and will be quiet enough to run in your ht room and will fit in a small form case. You can also utilize faster DDR3 2133 with those processors which should give you a few extra fps. A great deal for the money because you won't have to $pend cash on an expensive or even inexpensive video card or large power supply, but of course it won't be an idea setup for gaming.

I'm thinking something along these lines: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/187Tx

You just bought a nice tv for use as a monitor, and you already have a quality sound system to plug into, so no need to spend money on a display or substandard computer speakers. Depending on the case you decide on, some come with power supplies, that although cheap, will work with your low power requirements. I can also hook you up windows 7 ultimate if you want or need to save a bit more.

The htpc will then become your new bluray player, cd player, media streamer, and in addition to easier handling the music and video production you plan on doing.
mphfrom77 likes this.

 
Spanglo is offline  
post #21 of 86 Old 06-21-2013, 01:16 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
mphfrom77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: northern KY
Posts: 3,685
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked: 205
Thanks for all the help fellas.

Still have tons of questions. I have already forgotten some.

This is not all of what I had been thinking about lately, but real quick:

I would want to think about 2 computers would I? One strictly for gaming and another for everything else. That would be silly right?

Also, I stumble up on this thread tonight: http://slickdeals.net/f/6102590-Intel-Core-i5-4670K-3-4GHz-LGA-1150-Quad-Core-Desktop-CPU-ASRock-Z87-Extreme6-HDMI-USB-3-0-ATX-Motherboard-Grid-2-Game-T-Shirt-335-Free-Shipping?

I assume deals like this happen fairly regularly? Anybody have any opinions on those type of deals?

I looked at some of the Mac computers on their website. Would it be a bad idea to consider buying a used Mac computer off of craigslist?

BTW, I do have a microcenter that is only a 20 minute drive farther than my workplace. Is that store something I should really monitor?
mphfrom77 is offline  
post #22 of 86 Old 06-21-2013, 06:44 AM
AVS Special Member
 
htskinner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,162
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
MPH if you have a microcenter that close your price dreams are answered (if you have the patience lol). I see in store stuff there all the time. Especially OEM CPU's.
That deal you linked is pretty good. The board won't run 2 cards at full speed but at that price point you probably aren't going to get one that will. But it is better than other boards in that range, especially considering that the bundle saves you $100.
The CPU has an unlocked multiplier meaning you could overclock if you got more comfortable with computers later on. It sounds like it runs hot even stock so a few $$ in a cooler would probably be a good idea. It's not that much to get super excited over, there will be other deals with the same amount of savings if you are wanting to sit back. If you do just keep watching sites like that dealnews and sign up for the microcenter ad.
htskinner is offline  
post #23 of 86 Old 06-21-2013, 09:39 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
mphfrom77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: northern KY
Posts: 3,685
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked: 205
Okay thanks. Yeah in the meantime I will try to sign up with microcenter to get an understanding of the market prices. For example right now 4770k is like $60 cheaper there than anywhere else.

But I still need to do research as I slacked off a little.

But I think I am leaning towards trying to build a PC.
mphfrom77 is offline  
post #24 of 86 Old 07-06-2013, 10:14 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
mphfrom77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: northern KY
Posts: 3,685
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked: 205
I still have not had a lot of time lately to do much more research.

I happened to look at craigslist last night and found an ad very close to me where a guy is trying to sell a build from just a few months ago. He is asking $450, and it looks like it would normally cost around $700. I haven't talked to him, just wonder what you would think?

http://cincinnati.craigslist.org/sys/3902581053.html

Would you all even consider used from someone you don't know?
mphfrom77 is offline  
post #25 of 86 Old 07-06-2013, 11:02 AM
AVS Special Member
 
DaverJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 6,622
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Liked: 394
Quote:
Originally Posted by mphfrom77 View Post

I still have not had a lot of time lately to do much more research.

I happened to look at craigslist last night and found an ad very close to me where a guy is trying to sell a build from just a few months ago. He is asking $450, and it looks like it would normally cost around $700. I haven't talked to him, just wonder what you would think?

http://cincinnati.craigslist.org/sys/3902581053.html

Would you all even consider used from someone you don't know?

I don't know if there's anything wrong with buying someone else's build, but I probably wouldn't. But I don't do Craigslist because I don't like strangers. tongue.gif

His typos cause concern - the motherboard is listed as a "G77-UD3H"? No such thing. I assume he means Z77-UD3H (did he put "G" as in Gigabyte?), which is the mobo i have and am happy with it.

For many of us, the act of picking out the parts and putting it together is half the fun, and the reward is the pride of a build we created. But in this case, you don't have the stress of any problems that might come up, and it's cheaper than buying all the parts new.

Anyway, the parts look good: mobo, CPU, power supply and RAM. Stock cooling on the CPU and cheap case, but that's just to keep cost down and not necessarily bad. I would toss the audio card. The worst thing is there's no video card, so if you want to do serious gaming, consider adding that and factor in the cost. Also, I would seriously consider adding an SSD for Windows. That motherboard has an mSATA slot - make sure he's including the Win7 disc if you want to re-install Windows!

EDIT: I just looked again and the hard-drive is smallish, but in his shopping cart he has a 1TB drive! He should have gone with that to begin with.

Also, do you have mouse, keyboard, and monitor?

If you trust him, could you talk him down to $400 cash? That would have a decent budget starter build if it checks out.

Good luck, and let us know if you if you go this route.
mphfrom77 likes this.

Console gamers curious/interested in PC gaming? Click here.
DaverJ is online now  
post #26 of 86 Old 07-07-2013, 10:15 AM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
mphfrom77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: northern KY
Posts: 3,685
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked: 205
I did talk to the guy. It was like pulling teeth to just get simple yes or no answers. I imagine I probably won't go that route.

I actually think I need to talk to a tax guy to see if I can write most of this off. I am kind of clueless on that area. Was wondering if I open up a YouTube channel for profit if that would allow me write off a computer build, and maybe a camera or two. So I think my next step is to talk with a tax guy I had in mind.

I'm also still somewhat confused on if trying to do all of this on one computer is my best course of action. I am not trying to go over the top, just trying to get an understanding. It seems a lot of people that I follow on YouTube have one computer for for gaming and one for recording and editing and stuff.

I just wonder if I should consider something like that and how that would work. I, mean this may not be feasible right off the bat but maybe something I could plan for in the beginning. I don't know just figure if I understood it all better I then could weigh the costs.

But I had some questions. Like for a strictly gaming pc, do the cpu, hard drives and other things not need to be that great but the gpu does? But for an editing pc then I would want a good cpu, hardrives and some other things would need to be nice, but the mother board, power supply, and gpu would not need to be anything special?

I don't know just trying to figure this out. Just trying to do the most effective, efficient course of action. In the end though, I get the idea that maybe I should just try to do one nice build here to start.

Not trying to ramble, just a little confused when I see these guys with two computers.
mphfrom77 is offline  
post #27 of 86 Old 07-07-2013, 01:50 PM
AVS Special Member
 
DaverJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 6,622
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Liked: 394
Quote:
Originally Posted by mphfrom77 View Post

Not trying to ramble, just a little confused when I see these guys with two computers.

I have two PCs within 8 feet of each other. Computer #1, my baby, is a gaming rig with SLI video cards, SSD, 16gigs of RAM hooked up to a TV in front of a comfy chair. Computer #2 is my work computer: a weak-sauce stock HP hooked up to dual Dell monitors for video editing via Avid Media Composer at a desk.

My gaming machine is way more powerful than the Avid machine. But Avid requires certain hardware, particularly video cards, to run their software. Because the Avid is a bare-bones configuration with a video card that has good drivers for displaying video but not 3D graphics, I wouldn't want to game on it. And because the game rig is hooked up to a TV and has modern, non Avid-certified video cards, I wouldn't want to edit video on the game computer.

At least that's my case. I'm sure other have reasons for having different computers for different tasks - raid hard drive storage or something.

Console gamers curious/interested in PC gaming? Click here.
DaverJ is online now  
post #28 of 86 Old 07-10-2013, 03:28 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
mphfrom77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: northern KY
Posts: 3,685
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked: 205
I have been trying to get an understanding on somethings but can't seem to make any progress, and was wondering if you guys could help point me in the right direction.

In looking at how much SSD I should go with in the beginning, I am curious to understand how that will work with recorded gameplay.
- For example in the past I hit record (xbox to laptop via PVR) and the laptop records the gameplay. About a GB per match lets say. At the end of the match much of the time I will just delete the recording. Or I save the video until I get around to editing it and produce a video, only then can I delete the video...so that I maintain the included clip.

My question has multiple parts.

Is it harmful to record to SSD, to only delete it (doing this behavior on a regular basis)?

Is so would I want to record to a regular HD?

What would be the best way to benefit from SSD as far as recorded gameplay and, then later, video creation?

I assume SSD could be very beneficial in video creation, especially when propagating the editing timeline and previewing the edited results. But is my cause for concern, about rewriting the SSD for this process often, a valid concern?

If it is not obvious, I am not too familiar with how most people would be using a SSD, and if I am looking to use one correctly.


Also I am having trouble understanding motherboards. Mainly the differences between the different 1150's. I am having trouble figuring out what I would need, and possibly want in the future. Does anyone have any advice or a good link that would help explain the differences to me.

Also I am having trouble understanding what "Thunderbolt" is and if that is something I might want to be included on my motherboard.

I'm also having a tough time getting an understanding on the different Memory Ram speeds / levels for CPU Ram. I don't understand if they will all work. Meaning if you go higher is it always better, as well as offering overclocking capability down the road. Or sometimes would the the higher Ram models not work. I just can't seem to find an understanding there.

I am leaning towards a i7 4770k and a single $300-$400 gpu (to start out)


Thanks!
mphfrom77 is offline  
post #29 of 86 Old 07-10-2013, 03:38 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
bd2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 10,410
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 199 Post(s)
Liked: 1376
I don't think an SSD will do much for your videos...HDDs are more than up to the task. Constantly writing to a SSD is how it gets worn out, but it'll still last you years unless you're banging away at it day in day out. Either way it's probably best to just record straight to a HDD, as long as its defragmented it should be fine.

Thunderbolt is a very high speed port that has limited support. Unless you have a specific thunderbolt accessory in mind, you really don't need it.

Faster RAM will downclock itself to the speed your CPU needs it to run at. I'm not sure you can even overclock by raising the FSB anymore, so I dunno why you'd need faster RAM.

Although I haven't had the opportunity to play around with Haswell yet....someone who has could probably be more specific on those points if anything has changed.
DaverJ and mphfrom77 like this.

Steam/PSN/Xbox Live: Darius510
bd2003 is online now  
post #30 of 86 Old 07-10-2013, 05:48 PM - Thread Starter
AVS Special Member
 
mphfrom77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: northern KY
Posts: 3,685
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked: 205
Jeez, I just assumed that SSD's would be exceptional at improving video production times.

What are the reasons most people go to SSD over a HDD.
mphfrom77 is offline  
Reply General Gaming Help

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off