Super NES R.I.P. :( - AVS Forum
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post #1 of 37 Old 01-07-2012, 06:22 PM - Thread Starter
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My Super Nintendo Entertainment System has died...

I pulled the system out of storage today with the intention of booting up some retro-goodness. Power light comes on but all I get is a black screen and no sound! I tried cleaning the system thoroughly but to no avail. Turned to google and I found no solution to the "black screen of death"-- it seems this is what happens to a 20 year old console.

So... I want opinions! I'm looking at two options:

1) Purchase a clone. There are a number of well regarded SNES clones on the market and most are pretty cheap: Retro Duo, FC Twin and the C2 Retro Twin. I realize that I can buy original SNES consoles but my unit was in immaculate condition and handled / stored with the utmost care and it STILL died of old age so I'd prefer to not gamble on a new OLD console.

2) Emulation. I realize that this is a bit of a 'grey' subject but I don't really care-- my system is dead and I own a library of games that I have a right as a consumer to play! Obviously I'm versed in the ways of emulation but there is just something about plopping down on the couch to play some Super Metroid vs sitting down in front of the computer! I would want a dedicated box fo this task and a quick search of newegg reveals that I'd need to invest a hefty sum to properly outfit a rig that would meet my diminutive requirements for footprint...

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post #2 of 37 Old 01-07-2012, 08:24 PM
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For those that don't want to read the following long winded reply, here's a summary.

1. Double check everything once more. Connections, cables, tv, reciever, etc.
2. Considering getting your system repaired. There's no reason why it can't last many more decades.
3. Consider replacing the hardware in kind. A used replacement will easily outlive a clone.
4. Clones are of poor construction, but are near 100% when it comes to accuracy.
5. If you go the emulation route, only use BSNES.

Try cleaning your games with alcohol and q tips. After a long period of storage, they just might not be making good contact. Also, old cartridge systems can be finicky at times (It isn't uncommon for it to take 3 or 4 attempts of removing and replacing the game for it to boot up). So if you came to this conclusion just based off a couple of attempts, I'd suggest checking again.

Also do the obvious things like double checking connections, swapping the AV cable (They're the same as what was used on the N64 and GCN, so many people will often have spares), making sure you've set your television's input correctly, etc. It seems strange that you'd be getting absolutely nothing. It's usually video but no sound (Or vice versa). Complete hardware failures are pretty uncommon. Is there a chance your hardware just doesn't like the 240p signal being sent to it and has decided it isn't a valid source so it isn't even attempting to display video and output audio?

And if it is dead, they're easy to work on and there are people that can fix it (Particularly if you have some sentiment attached to this and would rather keep your existing system instead of replacing it). And despite this misconception you've formed, cartridge based systems don't die very often. I'm running nearly 40 year old 2600's on a routine basis with no issues. Remember that song called 'Like a Rock'? That describes most cartridge based consoles to a tee (And the issues that do exist, such as with NES cartridge slots, are easy to work on typically). So don't be afraid to purchase a used replacement since I can assure you that failures are very uncommon (And keep your existing system, the plastic used on many Super Nintendo's have degraded over the years and yellowed so you might want to do a case swap if yours is pristine, although the yellowing can now be reversed due to the RetroBright formula for old computers and such). They built these things to last, unlike modern game consoles. So I wouldn't worry about the longevity of the original hardware. You just had some bad luck.

The weakest link on a SuperNes is the controller itself. While I've always loved it, the start/select and shoulder buttons are prone to failure (Although it's a $2/5 minute job with a button replacement kit bought off ebay to fix them). There are no common issues with the system itself. A used replacement is going to last you a heck of a lot longer than a cheap clone.

That said, as far as accuracy goes, the clones are very good. My RetroDuo is compatible with original SuperNes accessories (The included controllers are pretty poor) and is virtually 100% compatible (Although the NES side isn't anywhere close and exhibits the usual NOAC issues... I'd never suggest it as a NES replacement.). The only problems of significance are some runs of a few very late releases (2-3 games we're talking about here), including at least one production run of Super Mario RPG, refuse to run since they think you're trying to copy the game due to the programmed antipiracy measures correctly identifying the hardware as not a legitimate SuperNes system. These SuperNes on a chips used by clone manufacturers though are excellent (I wish the same could be said for their NES and Genesis cousins). Beyond some early issues with colors being off on SuperFX games that were fixed long ago, they're darn near 100%.

Nothing wrong talking about emulation. The patents on the SuperNes expired years ago and it's 100% legal to emulate the hardware (And there's no copyrighted material to violate, the SuperNes didn't have a bios). And there's legitimate homebrew software to run as well, so discussing it doesn't automatially mean you're talking piracy (So I'd hope the moderators leave you alone). Anyways, the popular SuperNes emulators aren't particularly good due to many shortcomings done to reduce system requirements and to simplfiy their task (ZNES and SNES9X). Make sure you go with BSNES since they're striving for 100% accuracy and is the one to go with if you go the HTPC route (Although the hardware requirements are far more than something like ZSNES due to their goal of accuracy). That's the way to go though if you want to play anything more than the 20-30 most popular games on the system (Which is what the programmers of something like ZSNES aim their efforts at, ignoring the other 95% of the library). And if you go this route, you'll certainly want one of these to complete your experience.

http://www.retrousb.com/product_info...products_id=29
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post #3 of 37 Old 01-08-2012, 02:11 PM - Thread Starter
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I appreciate the response!

Without going in to too much detail I spent a LONG while trouble shooting yesterday...

Tried 3 different displays: plasma, LCD, CRT; a variety of connection types: component, s-video, RF switch, universal cable; no less than 2 power adapters. I tried cleaning the system, first with the dry system certified by Nintendo, then with the t-shirt credit card trick-- one important thing to note here, the contacts on the system were fairly clean as-is and had plenty of grip. Of course, I also cleaned the 4 different cartridges I attempted being careful to thoroughly clean each before connecting to the console.

No luck.

In my travels around the web looking for a fix I ran into quite a lot of anecdotal instances that sounded like mine: power led but no video/audio, just a black screen. This is not attributed to the more common issue that effects these units (the power connector / fuse problems). I finally found one guy who claims that he had had his system cleaned/repaired but that it still went to this "black scree of death". When he took it too the shop the technician there explained that his pcb was the issue-- caps or other component failure-- and told him it would be cheaper to replace the unit.

I mean, eventually stuff just dies. The console is 20 years old. I could find no one willing to take the unit for repair other than for the aforementioned 2 power issues. At the same time, I don't want to blow too much money on it as I actually use znes and have been pleased by it's replication of the old games I remember especially with the added visual filters that help to compensate for these games being designed two decades ago on low definition displays...

I'm encouraged about your assessment of the retro duo. How does the s-video out look? I've also had my eye in the newer C2 from tomee but I can't find out if it offers s-video. My local retro shop has a snes jr for sale but I've confirmed that that model is NOT compatible with the s-video output.

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post #4 of 37 Old 01-08-2012, 03:37 PM
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I use homebrew for my wii for emulation and I'm pretty happy with it. The wii remote isn't perfect for SNES games but it works. There are some antialiasing measures in the emulator that work fairly well.

Thankfully none of the games I've played rely on shoulder buttons. Also you could use the classic controller if needed.

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post #5 of 37 Old 01-08-2012, 08:37 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moothemagiccow View Post

I use homebrew for my wii for emulation and I'm pretty happy with it. The wii remote isn't perfect for SNES games but it works. There are some antialiasing measures in the emulator that work fairly well.

Thankfully none of the games I've played rely on shoulder buttons. Also you could use the classic controller if needed.

Hmm... I never really got into the modding scene as I barely touched my wii (lololololololol).

Ahem... Anyways, like I was saying, I never really looked into modding the wii. Guess it just never occurred to me to do that! I just figured I would buy one of these little net top computers and install what I need to run an emulation program on that. Maybe make it into a htpc while I was at it... But, honestly, I'm feeling lazy and would really like to just hook something up that works which I don't have to fiddle with. Installing a modded OS sounds like I'd have to fiddle with the wii too much... (lololololololol)

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post #6 of 37 Old 01-08-2012, 08:53 PM
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If it were me I would just pickup a clone system. I know my retron3 accepts SNES controllers and runs games almost perfect. I mean you have the games and controllers, might as well. Something about having an actual cart and controller in hand that emulators/roms cant compare.

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post #7 of 37 Old 01-09-2012, 02:41 AM
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With the Wiimote's two face buttons, it strikes me as all but useless for homebrew SuperNes emulation (The percentage of games that used just two of the four buttons is fairly low). Might as well buy a Classic Controller to plug into it since it's perfect for SuperNes games (Has ABXY in the same place as a SNES controller, two shoulder buttons, and a significantly better d-pad that more closely resembles past Nintendo designs).

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caps or other component failure-- and told him it would be cheaper to replace the unit..

It could certainly be capacitors that have dried out (One of the more common ailments on classic consoles and something that isn't too difficult to tackle with some basic soldering skills). But usually it would just negatively affect things like audio and video (A dim video output, for instance). It would surprise me to find that one has completely failed on a SuperNes since I'm not sure I've ever heard of such a case despite years of visits to classic gaming forums and the like. And it would surprise me even more to find that it killed both video and audio.

Often, you'd be able to tell if a capacitor is starting to fail or has failed completely just from a visual inspection (Although I doubt you have the appropriate gamebit laying around to open the case). But if you want to take a look, that's an option to see. And since you mentioned fuses, it jogged my memory. I've seen numerous instances of that over the years on this system at various forums and it seems like an easy fix with some basic skills and equipment.

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I'm encouraged about your assessment of the retro duo. How does the s-video out look? I've also had my eye in the newer C2 from tomee but I can't find out if it offers s-video. My local retro shop has a snes jr for sale but I've confirmed that that model is NOT compatible with the s-video output.

S-video is easy to do on the redesigned SuperNes (It's a 10 minute job, nobody is sure why Nintendo left things disconnected). But I'd stay away from it since there's every possibility it's a fake clone. The US and Canada have been swamped over the last 10 years with fake SNES2 systems and if you don't know what you're looking for to identify a legitimate one (And this goes for SNES2 controllers as well with the molded Nintendo logo on the front), there's no sense paying a premium over a brand new RetroDuo and such just to likely get a used fake counterfeit that is no better than any other clone.

The s-video output is just fine for SuperNes games on the RetroDuo. Just don't use it for the NES side since it won't work correctly for some reason (A flaw in the NOAC prevents s-video output from functioning correctly with NES games). But the chip is so horrible that they use for NES games (And the NES cartridge slot of a RetroDuo has a deathgrip on cartridges) that I suggest treating it simply as a SuperNes and ignore the other half of it.

And also consider the Hyperkin Supaboy. They just came out and it's a handheld using the same SNES chip as a RetroDuo. And it includes tv/out and SuperNes controller ports so it can double as a console. Only problem is it lacks s-video and is composite only. Otherwise, this one gets my recommendation since it's a decent handheld version of the SuperNes.

http://hyperkin.com/index.php/supabo...-console.html/
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post #8 of 37 Old 01-09-2012, 03:27 AM
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My recommendation: Buy a used one. However, try and see if you buy one of the remodeled versions (presumably used) that Nintendo released in about '97-'98. I bought one when they came out.

The reason I say try this model is because you would at least know that it could only be about 13-14 years old and probably cheap.

This is what they look like if you don't know.
http://www.mario-kart.net/challenge/...SNESSystem.jpg
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post #9 of 37 Old 01-09-2012, 07:57 AM - Thread Starter
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@Leo_Ames

Yes, I did see the Super Boy at my local GamePlay! It's a neat toy but nothing I would be interested in.

So there are fake SNES 101s in the wild? I was super tempted by the model they had for sale. Looked legit but then again I didn't know there were fakes... Price was decent but the knowledge that it didn't work with s-video was a turn off. so Nintendo actually still supports the feature they just didn't wire the plug? Or is it a new connector that you need? I'll google it and see what I can find.

I'm not sure how much it matters these days with fewer and fewer TVs accepting s-video, but it's a feature I'd like to retain.

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post #10 of 37 Old 01-09-2012, 08:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aidoroboo View Post

My recommendation: Buy a used one. However, try and see if you buy one of the remodeled versions (presumably used) that Nintendo released in about '97-'98. I bought one when they came out.

Came in here to recommend this. I don't think anything beats the feeling of playing SNES games on an actual SNES system. I have a feeling the clone SNES systems will die out sooner than if you picked up a used SNES. They don't make systems to last like that anymore.

Sage, my advice would be to go for the SNES revision model.

Too many systems and games....not enough time or money!

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post #11 of 37 Old 01-09-2012, 12:41 PM - Thread Starter
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How do I tell if the model 101 they have is a legit one or not? Tried googling this and didn't come up with anything on how to identify a fake... Also, how much of a hassle is it to modify the original for s-video output? Will it even make a difference on an HDTV?

I really wish that Nintendo had supported a VGA box of some kind. It's one of the reasons that my dreamcast is still hooked up while my other systems are not!

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post #12 of 37 Old 01-09-2012, 12:55 PM
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You guy's are tempting me to hook up my SNES to see if it still works. Kids will probably go nuts over this!
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post #13 of 37 Old 01-09-2012, 02:21 PM
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My Super Nintendo is by far my most treasured system( followed by Dreamcast). Most of its gems are still very playable today, and unlike the early 3D era PS1/Saturn/N64, I actually find that 'archaic' 2D sprites have aged better. I popped in Resident Evil 2 Ps1 for the first time in ages over the weekend, in addition to the clunky controls I literally couldn't stand the sight of the graphics. I then popped in Rayman PS1, was still a blast to play and the game's colorful graphics are still beautiful( resolution aside) to behold.

Too many systems and games....not enough time or money!

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post #14 of 37 Old 01-09-2012, 04:52 PM
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Buy a Wii and run the games in VC?
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post #15 of 37 Old 01-09-2012, 06:04 PM
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Another nice thing with the RetroDuo is it supports the recent multicart releases (The Super Powerpak and the Super Everdrive) that allow you to place 95% of the SuperNes library on to flash memory to play on real hardware (Although games that used special chips besides the DSP chip like Super Mario Kart used won't work on it, but there aren't many that used things like the SuperFX chip).

Quote:
Originally Posted by sage11x View Post

So there are fake SNES 101s in the wild? I was super tempted by the model they had for sale. Looked legit but then again I didn't know there were fakes... Price was decent but the knowledge that it didn't work with s-video was a turn off. so Nintendo actually still supports the feature they just didn't wire the plug?

Yep, there are fake SNES101's out there. Here's a page I found after a quick search that can help you identify one.

http://www.gamesx.com/wiki/doku.php?id=counterfeit_snes

And like I said, the same goes for SNES2 controllers that came with the system and were sold individually as accessories when the SNES2 was released (Notice the molded Nintendo logo, that wasn't there with the original version of the controller and is an easy identifier that you're looking at a SNES2 era controller). These are so widely available as counterfeits that I suggest just staying with an original controller (Which you clearly must have anyways since you also own an original console, I'm mentioning this more for the record to help someone else down the road).

But for someone that does buy one of these controllers, prime signs it's fake will be a short controller cord, the soft edges on the molded Nintendo logo versus crisp lettering on a legitimate one, and poor buttons and such that feel more like a cheap clone rather than a piece of official Nintendo equipment. Heck, they've even copied the boxes like the one I linked to.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:SN...lerPackage.jpg

And they simply just didn't wire the multiout AV output for s-video by connecting the appropriate pins (Easily fixed with a few minutes with a soldering iron, two wires, two capacitors, and two resistors). It's bizarre since it doesn't appear to have even been done for cost savings (It's believed to have been an oversight, and it was fixed when the Super Famicom counterpart that looked similar was released in Japan Edit - Looks like I'm wrong and the Super Famicom Jr. also lacked s-video support). Here's a page from the Digital Press forums dealing with it. One of the easiest s-video mods for a classic system since you're basically just completing a connection with the hardware itself already supporting s-video. Incidently, the situation is very similar with RGB.

http://www.digitpress.com/forum/show...NES-Jr-S-Video

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Will it (S-Video) even make a difference on an HDTV?

S-Video certainly is beneficial over composite and can make a difference on an HDTV (Although like you already said, that's been a widespread target for elimination over the last 2-3 years by tv manufacturers to save a dime so that's something for others to keep in mind as they read this since their fancy new HDTV likely doesn't even have a s-video input).

Although if you want my advice, hop on Craigslist or something similar and find a large, late model, Sony Trinitron CRT or the equivalent to play SuperNes games on. I've seen people pay someone to haul several thousand dollar high end CRT's that weren't even 5 years old before. No shortage of deals to be had and it's the way to go for classic gaming.

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Buy a Wii and run the games in VC?

Very little of the library of the system is available on the Virtual Console. And only Nintendo's own backcatalog got halfway decent coverage on it (With some exceptions like their SuperFX lineup and Earthbound). If you wanted to play a specific 3rd party game, odds are overwhelmingly against it actually being available on the Virtual Console.

In other words, it's no substitute for the real thing. Plus, he already has a library of games and three or four Virtual Console downloads at $8 a pop will net him something like a new RetroDuo or used SuperNes to play them on.

However, it's a nice complement to the real deal. I've repurchased several favorites since they look nice going through the Wii's component output and I like the suspend state system of the emulator.
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post #16 of 37 Old 01-10-2012, 07:44 AM
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sorry for your loss, amigo.

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Originally Posted by DeadmanInc View Post

You guy's are tempting me to hook up my SNES to see if it still works. Kids will probably go nuts over this!

Don't count on it although my kids are little, so they may not be a good sample. Definitely worth plugging in again, if only for papa. I found they liked Super Mario World and a Scooby Doo game, the rest not so much right now. Maybe in time they'll come to know and appreciate the greatest generation (of gaming, that is).


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My Super Nintendo is by far my most treasured system( followed by Dreamcast). Most of its gems are still very playable today, and unlike the early 3D era PS1/Saturn/N64, I actually find that 'archaic' 2D sprites have aged better. I popped in Resident Evil 2 Ps1 for the first time in ages over the weekend, in addition to the clunky controls I literally couldn't stand the sight of the graphics. I then popped in Rayman PS1, was still a blast to play and the game's colorful graphics are still beautiful( resolution aside) to behold.

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Came in here to recommend this. I don't think anything beats the feeling of playing SNES games on an actual SNES system. I have a feeling the clone SNES systems will die out sooner than if you picked up a used SNES. They don't make systems to last like that anymore.

Sage, my advice would be to go for the SNES revision model.

Agreed on both points. My SNES looks like it sat in a VFW smoking lounge, but it's easily my favorite console and, should it ever kick the digital sprite-based bucket, will be replaced with a resl SNES console. Emulators are convenient, but they're not the same experience to me. Plus supergameboy. That and GBplayer for GCN are like Christmas coming every day, man.

Try your local craigslist, yard sales come spring, used game store, or even pawn shop (Bought one there myself once, might be the last time I visited a pawn shop come to think of it)
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post #17 of 37 Old 01-10-2012, 11:41 AM
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Agreed on both points. My SNES looks like it sat in a VFW smoking lounge

Much of the plastic Nintendo used was of inferior quality. Over time, the fire retardents in the plastic caused it to become brittle and for the plastic to yellow.

If you'd like to reverse that (It's fully reversible, assuming there isn't any physical damage like cracks or chipping), look up RetroBright. It will restore a SuperNes casing (Or a 1980's computer like a Commodore 64, for some reason yellowing was near universal with 80's computer equipment) and return it to its original appearance.

I'm lucky since my system from 1995 has largely been immune to it. Just some slight yellowing in the plastic bit around the controller ports. I'll RetroBright that someday so it's all gray again.
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post #18 of 37 Old 01-11-2012, 10:49 AM
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Quote:
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Much of the plastic Nintendo used was of inferior quality. Over time, the fire retardents in the plastic caused it to become brittle and for the plastic to yellow.

If you'd like to reverse that (It's fully reversible, assuming there isn't any physical damage like cracks or chipping), look up RetroBright. It will restore a SuperNes casing (Or a 1980's computer like a Commodore 64, for some reason yellowing was near universal with 80's computer equipment) and return it to its original appearance.

I'm lucky since my system from 1995 has largely been immune to it. Just some slight yellowing in the plastic bit around the controller ports. I'll RetroBright that someday so it's all gray again.

How have I never heard of this wizardry??!

Sounds like i have some googling go do although the yellowish stains do give it a certain "What are you lookin at, punk? Never saw a wooden leg before?" appeal vs the pristine, ice white Wii it sits next to. Maybe everyone needs a crazy uncle, if only for contrast.
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post #19 of 37 Old 01-12-2012, 08:23 AM - Thread Starter
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Well, as I said I have found a used SNES mini at my local GamePlay. It's not cheap-- about the same price you can buy a retro duo for online. I worry about a couple things with this unit:
1) this console is nearly 14/15 years old, how many more years does this system have in it?
2) this unit is obviously used and, while nothing appears broken, how will that affect longevity as I can clearly see that the system has several stains, markings, and dirt trapped in it's crevices?
3) no s-video support! Yes I know I can "mod" it but with my lack of soldering skills that is NOT going to happen. In my experience even with the old, smallish CRT TVs s video made a substantial difference! I can only imagine how much better s video will be on a large LCD or plasma!

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post #20 of 37 Old 01-12-2012, 05:47 PM
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Well, as I said I have found a used SNES mini at my local GamePlay. It's not cheap-- about the same price you can buy a retro duo for online. I worry about a couple things with this unit:
1) this console is nearly 14/15 years old, how many more years does this system have in it?

These old cartridge-based systems, particularly Nintendo ones, are built like tanks. If you're a little iffy on this particular model at Gameplay, you won't have any problems finding one in better condition on ebay/amazon/craiglist. It's anyone's guess how long one of these retro duos will last, but I've read many tales of people's SNES consoles working perfectly 20 years on.

Too many systems and games....not enough time or money!

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post #21 of 37 Old 01-12-2012, 07:05 PM - Thread Starter
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These old cartridge-based systems, particularly Nintendo ones, are built like tanks. If you're a little iffy on this particular model at Gameplay, you won't have any problems finding one in better condition on ebay/amazon/craiglist. It's anyone's guess how long one of these retro duos will last, but I've read many tales of people's SNES consoles working perfectly 20 years on.

Yes, except:
A) Mine failed even though it was handled with the utmost care.
B) All evidence that SNES is a "tank" is heresay and pulled from personal experience-- many people who either service these machines or buy/sell/trade in used machines say that, to the contrary, these consoles are prone to death-from-old-age and that mother board failures are common.
C) Purchasing from an on-line retailer opens me up to receiving a forgery.

The more I look at my options the more I realize that emulation may be my best option. I just love the simplicity of plugging in a cart-- but unless nintendo re-releases the SNES (which I highly doubt as they will want to keep over-charging on Virtual Console) I'm stuck with either a poor quality clone or an aging who-knows-where-it's-been original.

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post #22 of 37 Old 01-12-2012, 07:22 PM
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People had broken Super Nintendo's right out of the box 20 years ago. Things happen to electronics (Heck, all three major consoles right now have had common issues and many semi widespread issues over the years). Even the Wii, considered the most reliable of the bunch, has given many people trouble over the years (Issues with double sided discs and GPU damage).

They manufactured these from late 1997 and kept restocking retailers into 2000. So this system might very well be barely a decade old (Plus, keep in mind that these came during the system's twilight, so it's likely been lightly used since the person probably moved on quickly to the Saturn/PSOne/N64 generation or the next). I'll be willing to bet my entire videogame collection that it will easily outlive at least 50% of the Xbox 360's and Playstation 3's out there today (And likely, far more than that).

Your thoughts about console longevity really aren't accurate. You're going off a sample size of 1. I have 5 Atari 2600's (A heavy sixer from 1977, two woodgrain 4 switchers from 1981/82, a black 4 switch from 83/84, and a Junior from the late 1980's). All work to this day with absolutely no maintenance ever having been done to them (Although two of them have had s-video mods installed). I can say similar things about most every cartridge based system in my collection. The one from 1977 is fast approaching its 35th birthday and is what I play 90% of my 2600 games on (And on an almost daily basis).

Super Nintendo's are built like a rock. I've been visiting classic gaming forums, communities that are dedicated to things like repair of classic systems, and have done stuff myself to them since I first went online in 1997 and think you're confusing common ailments to look for when you're having issues as evidence that Super Nintendo's are failure prone. And a little bit of grime comes with the territory with a used system, but I suspect it's just fine internally (Although if there are issues you can't fully clean up, I'd keep shopping around if I were you so you get a nice looking one). Also, since it popped in my mind, keep your old AC adapter around as a spare since it's fully compatible with the system redesign. And I can assure you that it will outlive a clone. It's really the controllers that are most failure prone on the thing (The shoulder buttons and start/select buttons aren't up to snuff and are common failure points), and you don't even have to solder to replace those (And replacements will cost you at most $5 to replace the failed buttons with new ones).

But if you really want s-video, just go with a RetroDuo. The worst that's going to happen is you'll have to replace it in a few years with another $30 clone. The weakest spot other than its build quality is the poor controllers, but it's fully compatible with your original controller so it's not much of an issue.

And I guess I should be forthcoming with this, I have little personal experience with this redesign. I bought one when they hit $50 and Wal-Mart had pallets full of them on Black Friday in the late 1990's, but it has sat in its box beyond a quick test to make sure it worked ever since. It's a spare for my original system and so far, it hasn't needed to be called up.
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post #23 of 37 Old 01-13-2012, 09:42 AM
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Yes, except:
A) Mine failed even though it was handled with the utmost care.
B) All evidence that SNES is a "tank" is heresay and pulled from personal experience-- many people who either service these machines or buy/sell/trade in used machines say that, to the contrary, these consoles are prone to death-from-old-age and that mother board failures are common.
C) Purchasing from an on-line retailer opens me up to receiving a forgery.

The more I look at my options the more I realize that emulation may be my best option. I just love the simplicity of plugging in a cart-- but unless nintendo re-releases the SNES (which I highly doubt as they will want to keep over-charging on Virtual Console) I'm stuck with either a poor quality clone or an aging who-knows-where-it's-been original.

Well, as Leo-Ames said, electronics are susceptible to lemons. The choice is yours, which direction you choose to go....I've never known SNES to be faulty, not from personal experience anyway. And well, really most electronics are probably prone to death from old-age, so I can't see why a SNES would be any different. The retro duo system, if you bought one today, could die tomorrow for all you know. It's a risk one way or another. I can only say that my cartridge systems from the 8 and 16 bit era have by far outlasted anything I've bought since( and I've owned about every major console over the last 25-30 years).

Too many systems and games....not enough time or money!

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post #24 of 37 Old 01-13-2012, 09:59 AM - Thread Starter
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Well, as Leo-Ames said, electronics are susceptible to lemons. The choice is yours, which direction you choose to go....I've never known SNES to be faulty, not from personal experience anyway. And well, really most electronics are probably prone to death from old-age, so I can't see why a SNES would be any different. The retro duo system, if you bought one, today, could die tomorrow for all you know. It's a risk one way or another.

Yes, don't get me wrong-- I appreciate the input. And I'm not suggesting that the SNES is a problematic device, only that it's long-term reliability might be a *bit exaggerated. I'm running into a LOT of forums, faqs, and storefronts that tell me a dead 20 year old SNES is not an uncommon sight and that my particular issue is contributed to the MB succumbing to old age.

Hey-- it's 20 years old! I should be so lucky if I'm alive 20 years from now! Lol!

I like the SNES mini! Between it's reduced footprint, simplified internals and recent manufacture date I'm sure that buying a mini is a safer bet than an OG or a clone... But the lack of s video bothers me. Why remove an option for better PQ? Especially if the internals can support it?? In fact, why not give us a proper VGA option as I KNOW that the SNES has to combine the output image to get a composite or S video out-- why not just give us access to actual output? Now I'm just ranting...

Maybe I'll try the mini and see how bad it looks-- it just drives me crazy knowing it COULD look better!

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post #25 of 37 Old 01-13-2012, 10:03 AM
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Yes, don't get me wrong-- I appreciate the input. And I'm not suggesting that the SNES is a problematic device, only that it's long-term reliability might be a *bit exaggerated. I'm running into a LOT of forums, faqs, and storefronts that tell me a dead 20 year old SNES is not an uncommon sight and that my particular issue is contributed to the MB succumbing to old age.

Hey-- it's 20 years old! I should be so lucky if I'm alive 20 years from now! Lol!

I like the SNES mini! Between it's reduced footprint, simplified internals and recent manufacture date I'm sure that buying a mini is a safer bet than an OG or a clone... But the lack of s video bothers me. Why remove an option for better PQ? Especially if the internals can support it?? In fact, why not give us a proper VGA option as I KNOW that the SNES has to combine the output image to get a composite or S video out-- why not just give us access to actual output? Now I'm just ranting...

Maybe I'll try the mini and see how bad it looks-- it just drives me crazy knowing it COULD look better!

check your PMs....

Too many systems and games....not enough time or money!

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post #26 of 37 Old 01-13-2012, 04:48 PM
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Someone may have mentioned this already, but the old Xbox makes a great SNES emulator and they are super cheap! You can probably pick up an already modded one with a bigger HDD for under $50.
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post #27 of 37 Old 01-14-2012, 05:41 AM - Thread Starter
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Someone may have mentioned this already, but the old Xbox makes a great SNES emulator and they are super cheap! You can probably pick up an already modded one with a bigger HDD for under $50.

Controllers are the issue there-- not to mention that is one UGLY box! Wii would probably be the better choice there as I wouldn't need to buy anything...

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post #28 of 37 Old 01-14-2012, 07:53 AM
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Controllers are the issue there-- not to mention that is one UGLY box! Wii would probably be the better choice there as I wouldn't need to buy anything...

What's the issue with the controllers? Plus you get the advantage of upscaling, pixel smoothing, etc, which makes them much more palatable on an HDTV.
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post #29 of 37 Old 01-14-2012, 10:51 AM - Thread Starter
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What's the issue with the controllers? Plus you get the advantage of upscaling, pixel smoothing, etc, which makes them much more palatable on an HDTV.

The Xbox controllers-- even the S-- are a disaster (IMO) and either way they aren't suited to playing old school games like snes or nes.

The best pads for 2D are: snes, Saturn slim, or (in a pinch) the playstation controller. Anything else is rubbish!

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post #30 of 37 Old 01-14-2012, 05:50 PM - Thread Starter
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Just found this and HAD to post it! They need to do this for the NES and SNES crowd...

http://www.analogueinteractive.com/

Also, CGR did a review here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hN-gwjNHfs&sns=em

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