Is Streaming an Important Feature When Selecting a Blu-ray Player? - Page 14 - AVS Forum
View Poll Results: Is Streaming an Important Feature When Selecting a Blu-ray Player?
No, it's all about playing the actual Blu-ray disc. 0 0%
Somewhat, I won't complain if it is there. 0 0%
It is a strong factor influencing my decision. 0 0%
I will not buy a Blu-ray player unless it includes streaming. 0 0%
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post #391 of 408 Old 05-16-2010, 04:12 PM - Thread Starter
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Leaked Netflix blog post indicates official HD streaming to PC launch soon

By Richard Lawler posted May 15th 2010 at 7:42PM

Still not seeing any HD Watch Instantly streaming on your PC or Mac? Don't worry, as all indications point to a full rollout sooner rather than later, the most recent being this post that momentarily popped up on Netflix's official blog long enough to be caught by Google. We've asked about any upgrades for the Media Center plugin but haven't heard anything back yet, but for now it's just a matter of "when" will everyone see the HD icon light up on that Silverlight player.

http://hd.engadget.com/2010/05/15/le...aming-to-pc-l/

I still prefer streaming from a Blu-ray player because of the simplicity but here is one for the HTPC fans.
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post #392 of 408 Old 05-18-2010, 03:53 PM - Thread Starter
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I am not sure that I agree with the authors choices but it is a good article none the less.

http://www.highdefdigest.com/blog/th...aming-devices/

The Three Best Netflix HD Streaming Devices

04-19-2010


You’ve got a lot of choices when it comes to devices streaming Netflix, and no matter which option you pick, you’re making a trade off. It might be the price, it might be the look, or it might be the functionality. So what’s the best choice? It depends on you. Here are my three picks for standalone, integrated and gaming solutions.

Roku HD XRIf you’re going to get a standalone Netflix player, you can’t do much better than the Roku HD XR. It’s the cheapest option, at $129, and it supports everything Netflix offers, and everything they’ll be offering in the foreseeable future. The Roku HD XR offers 720p video output and it’ll work with the upcoming Netflix 5.1 surround sound update. It offers stereo audio outs, an optical output, and the option to send audio through HDMI. Perhaps best of all, it’s got built in WiFi connectivity that supports 802.11N as well as WEP, WPA, and WPA2 encryption.

The menu is nice and snappy and there’s very little lag when navigating through your options. Yes, the user interface is starting to feel a bit dated compared to other options, and the video quality could be better, but it remains the best standalone device, and one of the cheapest ways to get Netflix in HD

In addition to Netflix, the Roku player will give you access to Amazon on Demand, Blip.tv, Revision3, Pandora, and a bevy of other streaming services.

Samsung BD-P3600 Blu-ray PlayerThere are a lot of Blu-ray player options for Netflix streaming, but they generally don’t offer enough of a difference to get too excited about. The Samsung BD-P3600 isn’t an expensive player by any means, but it does offer a great Netflix experience. The downside to the 3600, if it can really be called a downside, is that the HQV chip from the previous year’s BD-P2500 isn’t present in the newer player. This HQV upscaling made standard definition DVDs, and Netflix content look just a bit nicer than on the 3600.

Where the 3600 really wins out is in speed and connectivity. It’s a faster loading player, which is great from a Blu-ray aspect, and it comes with a WiFi dongle. If you don’t need to go wireless, you can still plug it in, but it’ll connect to your 802.11N network with ease. The BD-P3600 also provides access to Pandora for your music streaming, which is great for parties, or for some nice background tunes. You’ve also got access to YouTube and Blockbuster On Demand.

Xbox 360This is a hands down win. While both the Wii and PS3 offer Netflix as a streaming option, neither matches up to the quality of the Xbox 360. To start with, the 360 has the best Netflix interface there is, aside from using your PC. It’s slick looking, it’s fast and intuitive, and it’s got some basic features that the others don’t. You can play a movie directly from the selection menu, rather than having to go one deeper, for example.

The 360 also separates itself by showing an indicator of quality before your selection starts. You know whether you’re getting an HD signal or something below. It’s not a huge problem on the other systems, but it’s nice to know whether you should stop your downloads to get a better picture.

The PS3 at least for now, requires a disc for Netflix viewing, which is inconvenient. Sony says that the PS3 will get disc-free streaming in the near future, which would make it a much better option, if not the best. The biggest downside to using a 360 for Netflix is that in addition to the $8.99 (minimum) you’re shelling out to Netflix every month, you’ve got to be an Xbox Live subscriber, at $5 a month. Add that up and it’s an extra $60 a year.
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post #393 of 408 Old 05-25-2010, 05:19 PM - Thread Starter
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Interesting article for the HTPC advocates.

Why I mothballed my media center PC

by Dan Ackerman Font sizePrintE-mailShare46 comments Yahoo! Buzz

With Google's announcement of the Google TV platform, there's a new potential light at the end of the tunnel for those looking for an easy way to get Web-based content on their living-room TVs. But for those of us who are fans of doing things the not-so-easy way, the concept of playing video files or surfing the Web via TV is nothing new, as we've been doing it through off-the-shelf or custom-built media center PCs for years.

Yet, as a longtime advocate of hooking a PC up to a big-screen television, I was more than a little surprised to find myself recently pulling the plug on my media center PC. There was nothing physically wrong with the home-built Shuttle small form factor system (actually the third media PC I had put together over the years), it was just that new technologies for consuming media content had made it largely superfluous.

With somewhere between seven and 10 devices hooked up to my plasma at any one time, any chance to simplify is welcome, especially as the media center PC was the only device in the mix not controlled by my Logitech Harmony universal remote.

For playing downloaded video files, we used to drag them to the media center PC's hard drive over our home network, and play them via VLC media player, using a Gyration gyroscopic mouse, which acted as a clever gesture-based media playback controller. The occasional ABC.com episode of Lost or CNET TV video was played in the same manner via Web browser.

But the media center PC was used most often as a Netflix streaming box; and once that technology came to the Xbox 360 (and later the PS3 and Wii), it lost a major reason for being.

I managed to replace the next two most common media center PC tasks with a single piece of software. Hulu video streaming and downloaded video file playback were both taken over in my home theater by the incredibly useful PlayOn media server app, accessed through the Xbox 360 (and less frequently, the PlayStation 3).

PlayOn is basically a software server that sits on your home PC, and transcodes a variety of video content to a compatible device (such as a game console) on your home network. It provides for Hulu streaming, but also handles Amazon on Demand video, some of the broadcast network video streams, and even Netflix (which we admit is kind of pointless now).



PlayOn uses this illustration to describe how the software works.

(Credit: PlayOn)
It's hard to overstate how useful this program is, especially for video playback. If you've ever tried to connect your game console to your home network for video streaming, you know what an exercise in frustration that can be, with connection errors, ridiculous code registrations, and incompatible file formats. With PlayOn, just drop the video files in a selected folder on the computer hosting the program, and you're all set. We've had no problem playing files over Wi-Fi, but the shuttle controls--fast-forward and rewind--can be a bit finicky.

The interface admittedly isn't much to look at, as it mimics the folder-driven file structure used by the Xbox and PS3; you'll be doing a lot of clicking and navigating to look up Hulu shows from the alphabetical folder list.

With PlayOn, the Netflix game console apps, and Last.fm music streaming (and specialty services such as the PS3's live Major League Baseball games), there's very little we used our media center PC for that hasn't been replicated elsewhere. The main missing ingredient is a decent Web browser; the built-in PS3 one really doesn't cut it.

With all these other options available, it was only natural that my media center PC would eventually become the odd man out, and lose its precious roost in my media cabinet.

Unfortunately, this story doesn't have the happiest of codas. If you're interested in trying out PlayOn, the company has just switched from a perfectly reasonable one-time $30 license purchase to a much-maligned subscription format of $40 for the first year, and $20 for each year after.

It's the oldest story in the book. A company makes a compelling, useful product, but it's almost too good, because you only need to make a one-time purchase and you're set. There's no recurring revenue for the seller, and no chance to rope you into a monthly or annual subscription (which can be a cash cow for anyone from Xbox Live to antivirus software to World of Warcraft).

Current users can keep their basic PlayOn media app, but new customers will have to either pony up for a subscription (which includes Web-streaming channels for Comedy Central, PBS, and others), or after a 14-day free trial, only get access to the local media streaming features (no Hulu, no Amazon on Demand, etc.).

Even with this unfortunate subscription model switch, I'm still comfortable with my decision to retire the media center PC. Considering the media streaming features of the current generation of game consoles, the still-useful PlayOn software, set-top boxes from companies like Roku, and Google's new TV initiative (not to mention TVs that actually include online streaming themselves), there are more than enough options to take care of 99 percent of my media needs without requiring another keyboard, mouse, or operating system install.

That said, we wish our old media center PC a happy retirement. It'll be sent to live on a horse farm in the country, with plenty of sunshine and fresh air--at least until we need to strip it for parts.


http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-...CarouselArea.0
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post #394 of 408 Old 07-06-2010, 03:56 PM - Thread Starter
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Netflix adds Relativity Media to its Instant queue, takes on HBO and Showtime

By Tim Stevens posted Jul 6th 2010 8:37AM

Ever wonder why premium movie channels (your HBOs and the like) get top-shelf Hollywood movies not long after their DVD release but yet you're still stuck streaming Mystery Science Theater 3000's greatest hits on Netflix? That situation could be changing thanks to a deal with Relativity Media, who you may not have heard of before but has had a hand in the production and distribution of big Hollywood flicks like 300 and A Serious Man. The deal with Netflix will bring some of the company's movies to Watch Instantly within months of their DVD release, avoiding the usual multi-year exclusivity window that pay networks usually require. Right now only a few movies are mentioned, including The Fighter, Skyline, Movie 43, and Season of the Witch, but this deal establishes Netflix as a player in this market, pitting itself against HBO and Showtime for first distribution of premium content to the small (but ever growing) screen. If things go well, your Instant queue could be getting a bit more plump over the next year or so.

http://www.engadget.com/2010/07/06/n...-takes-on-hbo/
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post #395 of 408 Old 07-19-2010, 10:39 PM - Thread Starter
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Netflix coming to Canada this fall

By Vlad Savov posted Jul 19th 2010 7:48AM Breaking News

Netflix has just announced it'll be taking its first tentative step abroad with a rollout of its video streaming service in Canada. Specifics are predictably light at the present moment, but interested Canucks can sign up now to be informed as soon as those details drop. So Canada in the fall... and the UK in winter, perhaps? We can only hope.


http://www.engadget.com/2010/07/19/n...ada-this-fall/
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post #396 of 408 Old 07-21-2010, 08:30 PM - Thread Starter
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REDBOX MAY INTRODUCE STREAMING

Redbox Plots Web Strategy in Challenge to Netflix

July 19 (Bloomberg) -- Redbox, which became the fastest- growing U.S. video retailer with DVD kiosks and a $1-a-day rental price stores couldn’t match, is developing an online strategy to stay competitive with larger rival Netflix Inc.

The company, the biggest division of Coinstar Inc., may use a Web service to expand its library beyond the 200 or so titles crammed into each of its 24,000 or so DVD dispensers, President Mitch Lowe said in an interview from Redbox’s headquarters in Oakbrook Terrace, Illinois.

“The way we look at it is, How can it help us deliver to our customers things we can’t do in our kiosks?” Lowe said. “What role might it play in expanding our selection?”

The approach Redbox outlines in October will be designed to narrow the gap with Netflix, which offers more than 100,000 titles by mail and 20,000 older films online. It may also help the company take more business from Blockbuster Inc., which is closing stores and recently skipped a debt payment.

“It’s absolutely imperative for them to have a digital story,” said Ralph Schackart, a New York-based analyst with Wiliam Blair & Co. “The question is, what will it look like?”

The transition won’t be easy. Redbox may look to a technology company such as Sonic Solutions Inc. to obtain know- how, said Schackart, who expects shares of Bellevue, Washington- based Coinstar to perform in line with the broader market over the next 12 months.

Online Imperative

Convenience and a low price have created a winning formula for Redbox, which lets shoppers rent discs by swiping a credit or debit card. Sales from dispensers located in and outside of grocery and convenience stores surged 70 percent in the first quarter. Technicians in Redbox’s offices monitor the machines, which hold multiple copies of films and up to 630 DVDs, for jams and other troubles, making sure people don’t leave angry.

At the same time, rivals led by Netflix are attracting millions of Web customers with larger selections and cutting out the need for stores.

Redbox is losing some business as renters use kiosks to get new releases and go to Netflix for older, harder-to-find titles, said Lowe, who left Netflix in 2002. His former employer, based in Los Gatos, California, increased first-quarter sales by 25 percent with its $8.99-a-month subscription for mail-order rentals and unlimited Web viewing.

Steve Swasey, a Netflix spokesman, declined to comment on Redbox’s plans. More than half of the company’s 14 million customers used the Web to watch films on TVs or other devices.

“Long before we had streaming we had a loved brand and we turned it into an even more loved brand with streaming with no additional cost,” Swasey said.

Save Time, Money

Redbox also faces competition from Apple Inc. and Best Buy Co., which sell movie downloads. Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the world’s largest retailer, bought the Vudu Inc. online entertainment service in February and Sears Holdings Corp., the largest department store owner, said on June 22 it plans to sell and rent movies online through an agreement with Sonic.

An accord with Novato, California-based Sonic would spare Redbox the time and cost of negotiating Web rights with studios, Schackart said. Sonic technology is already in DVD players and TVs, and the company has rights to thousands of movies.

“Sonic gives Redbox a digital olive branch with the studios,” Schackart said.

Sonic provides technology and a library of about 20,000 movie titles to clients including Best Buy and Sears, Chris Taylor, a company spokesman, said in an interview. He declined to say whether Sonic is in talks with Coinstar, which also won’t comment on the matter.

Legal Battles Ended

Redbox ended legal battles this year with three studios, News Corp.’s Fox, General Electric Co.’s NBC Universal and Time Warner Inc.’s Warner Bros., over access to DVDs. The studios agreed to sell discs to Redbox for rental after the movies had been in stores for 28 days.

Walt Disney Co., Viacom Inc.’s Paramount Pictures, Sony Pictures Entertainment and Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. let Redbox offer DVDs when they become available for sale in stores.

While North American DVD purchases tumbled the past three years, rentals are expanding and are projected to rise at an average rate of 2.7 percent to $9.97 billion by 2014, helped by higher-priced Blu-ray discs, Matthew Lieberman, an analyst with PricewaterhouseCoopers, said in an interview.

The growth means Redbox will continue to attract consumers, Lowe said.

Redbox, and its $1-a-night price, began in 2002 as a test by McDonald’s Corp. to lure diners into restaurants, according to the Redbox website. Coinstar invested three years later and bought out McDonald’s in 2009.

Profit Outlook

Before the affiliation with Coinstar, which also operates coin-counting machines and a money-transfer service, Redbox had trouble convincing retailers to accept the machines, Lowe said. The parent leveraged relationships from the placement of its coin-counting machines to win acceptance of the DVD kiosks.

Coinstar is scheduled to report second-quarter earnings on July 29. Analysts project profit of 36 cents a share excluding some items, the average of six estimates compiled by Bloomberg, an increase from 23 cents a year earlier. Sales probably expanded 21 percent to $381.3 million, they estimate.

Coinstar fell $2.44, or 5.2 percent, to $44.56 at 4 p.m. New York time in Nasdaq Stock Market trading. The stock has gained 60 percent this year. Netflix, which today announced plans to start a streaming service in Canada this year, advanced 51 cents to $118.90.

With first-quarter sales of $263 million, Redbox is Coinstar’s largest division. On average, renters keep DVDs for two nights and spend $2 per movie, Lowe said. The company is testing video games and prices of as much as $1.75 a day for Blu-ray in some markets, Lowe said.

Redbox expects demand for physical rentals to remain high.

“The disc business has a great future,” Lowe said. “Especially with Blu-ray coming out. It extends the life.”

--Editors: Rob Golum, Anthony Palazzo

To contact the reporter on this story: Michael White in Los Angeles at mwhite8@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Anthony Palazzo at apalazzo@bloomberg.net.

http://www.businessweek.com/news/201...o-netflix.html
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post #397 of 408 Old 07-22-2010, 09:39 PM - Thread Starter
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Netflix plans discless Watch Instantly on the PS3 by late October, more 'pure streaming' worldwide

By Richard Lawler posted Jul 21st 2010 9:17PM

It's still a pretty big window, but Netflix CEO Reed Hastings has narrowed down the time until we can expect a disc-free streaming experience on our PS3s from "later this year" to some time before its next earning call, which should happen around October 21. Other notes from the Q2 highlights included a shoutout to Hulu Plus, where Netflix "plans to learn what customers like about Hulu Plus" and use that to enhance its service, as well as the upcoming launch of a streaming service in Canada, and how the lessons learned may be applied to other "pure streaming" offerings internationally in the future. Investors aren't too happy the company missed earnings projections, but we're figuring once they close the ETrade window and pick up a Shockaxis they'll start to get over it.

http://www.engadget.com/2010/07/21/n...y-late-octobe/
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post #398 of 408 Old 07-23-2010, 09:09 AM
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“Especially with Blu-ray coming out. It extends the life.”

Have these guys been in a cave? How long will it be before they have them available?
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post #399 of 408 Old 08-14-2010, 10:19 PM - Thread Starter
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Netflix, EPIX deal is official; Paramount, MGM and Lionsgate movies start streaming September 1

By Richard Lawler posted Aug 10th 2010 8:32AM Breaking News

Netflix streaming queue starting to look a little stale? It's working on that, and has signed a deal that brings EPIX's library of movies to Watch Instantly -- just not that instantly. If you're not familiar with EPIX, allow us to refresh you, it's a network launched last year by Paramount, MGM and Lionsgate that brings their movies home (though often unfortunately cropped and zoomed to 16x9) through a linear channel, video on-demand or internet streaming. Under this new agreement, movies from those studios can come to Netflix 90 days after they debut on the premium pay-tv and subscription VOD services. While that means streamers won't get access to Iron Man 2, The Expendables, or Dinner for Shmucks anywhere near day-and-date with their DVD or Blu-ray releases, those kinds of high profile flicks will show up and stick around with greater regularity than we've been used to. The companies haven't released further details, but rumors reported by the L.A. Times suggest licensing costs could reach $1 billion over the next 5 years. The first movies covered by the new deal arrive September 1, likely with flicks from the Star Trek, James Bond and Indiana Jones series (hopefully not Kingdom of the Crystal Skull) among them.

Update: Analyst Dan Rayburn claims on Business of Video that Netflix won't be getting any EPIX movies in HD, so we asked Netflix VP of Corporate Communications Steve Swasey whether we could expect HD streaming movies with Movie Parties or if they would have Starz-like restrictions. The answer? "HD over time and no restrictions on Party Viewing." Take from that what you will.



Show full PR text
EPIX AND NETFLIX ANNOUNCE EXCLUSIVE INTERNET-ONLY DEAL TO INSTANTLY STREAM EPIX MOVIES TO NETFLIX MEMBERS

NEW YORK and BEVERLY HILLS, Calif., August 10, 2010 – EPIX™ and Netflix, Inc. [Nasdaq: NFLX] today announced an agreement through which Netflix members can instantly watch an array of new releases and library titles from EPIX streamed over the Internet from Netflix. Movies from the multi-year deal will begin streaming from Netflix on September 1 and include movies from Paramount, Lionsgate and MGM.

EPIX has subscription pay TV rights to new releases and movies from the libraries of its partners and will make these movies available to Netflix 90 days after their premium pay TV and subscription on demand debuts. Historically, the rights to distribute these films are pre-sold to pay TV for as long as nine years after their theatrical release.

For Netflix, the agreement is a significant step in building the company's streaming offer, adding many popular movie titles from some of the world's leading studios. It adds meaningfully to a growing library of movies and TV shows that can be watched instantly on TVs via a range of leading consumer electronic devices capable of streaming from Netflix and on computers.

For EPIX, the deal reflects the value of the EPIX platform which, from its start, has provided new rights and flexibility for the distribution of its movies. The agreement allows EPIX to continue the distribution of popular content on a variety of platforms and preserve the premium television, subscription on demand and online window reserved for cable, satellite and telco television partners.
"Adding EPIX to our growing library of streaming content, as the exclusive Internet-only distributor of this great content, marks the continued emergence of Netflix as a leader in entertainment delivered over the Web," said Ted Sarandos, chief content officer for Netflix. "The EPIX deal is an example of the innovative ways in which we're partnering with major content providers to broaden the scope and freshness of choices available to our members to watch instantly over the Internet."

Mark Greenberg, president of EPIX, added: "Netflix is an incredibly popular service and we welcome them as our newest distribution partner. We are pleased to be able to continue our mission of bringing consumers the movies where they want to watch them, while satisfying the differing needs of cable, telco and satellite operators. This deal also underscores the tremendous value of our offerings in the marketplace."



About Netflix

With more than 15 million members, Netflix, Inc. (Nasdaq: NFLX) is the world's largest subscription service streaming movies and TV episodes over the Internet and sending DVDs by mail. For $8.99 a month, Netflix members can instantly watch unlimited TV episodes and movies streamed to their TVs and computers and can receive unlimited DVDs delivered quickly to their homes. With Netflix, there are never any due dates or late fees. Members can select from a growing library of titles that can be watched instantly and a vast array of titles on DVD. Among the large and expanding base of devices that can stream movies and TV episodes from Netflix are Microsoft's Xbox 360, Sony's PS3 and Nintendo's Wii consoles; Blu-ray disc players from Samsung, LG and Insignia; Internet TVs from LG, Sony and VIZIO; the Roku digital video player and TiVo digital video recorders, and Apple's iPad tablet. For more information, visit http://www.netflix.com.

About EPIX

EPIX, a joint venture between Viacom Inc. [NYSE: VIA and VIA.B], its Paramount Pictures unit, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. (MGM) and Lionsgate [NYSE: LGF], is a next-generation premium entertainment channel, on-demand and online service. EPIX provides a powerful entertainment experience with more feature films on demand and online and more HD movies than any other service. It is the only premium service providing its entire monthly line-up of new Hollywood titles, classic feature films, original series, music and comedy specials through the linear channel, on-demand and online. EPIX has made the commitment to deliver the industry's most expansive online collection of movies, making more than 3,000 titles available to subscribers this year. The service is available to over 30 million homes nationwide through carriage agreements with Verizon FiOS, DISH Network, Cox Communications, Mediacom Communications, Charter Communications and NCTC. For more information about EPIX, go to www.EpixHD.com

http://www.engadget.com/2010/08/10/n...lionsgate-mov/
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post #400 of 408 Old 08-15-2010, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Geaux Tigers View Post

While that means streamers won't get access to Iron Man 2, The Expendables, or Dinner for Shmucks anywhere near day-and-date with their DVD or Blu-ray releases, those kinds of high profile flicks will show up and stick around with greater regularity than we've been used to. The companies haven't released further details, but rumors reported by the L.A. Times suggest licensing costs could reach $1 billion over the next 5 years. The first movies covered by the new deal arrive September 1, likely with flicks from the Star Trek, James Bond and Indiana Jones series (hopefully not Kingdom of the Crystal Skull) among them.

If Dinner For Shmucks isn't included it would be a blessing IMO. Went to see it last week. It's the first time in a very, very long time that I walked out of a movie before the movie was over...and I wasn't the only one.

As for the possible EPIX deal, I'm all for Netflix increasing the quantity and quality of its Watch Instantly offerings since I'm a frequent user of this feature.
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post #401 of 408 Old 11-18-2010, 11:46 AM - Thread Starter
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When this thread began, many blu-ray players did not incorporate streaming but now it appears that almost all blu-ray players include it. There was a lot of opposition to streaming being included as a feature on blu-ray players since it was felt by some that doing so would diminish the quality of a blu-ray player. Does anyone still feel this way?
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Originally Posted by Geaux Tigers View Post
When this thread began, many blu-ray players did not incorporate streaming but now it appears that almost all blu-ray players include it. There was a lot of opposition to streaming being included as a feature on blu-ray players since it was felt by some that doing so would diminish the quality of a blu-ray player. Does anyone still feel this way?
You are, as usual, misstating the opposing opinion, which is that choosing a BD player based on its streaming capabilities is to narrow your choices for the wrong reason. The primary reason for choosing one player over another is that the player best meets all of your needs as a BD player.

Streaming capabilities in all sorts of devices were (and still are) evolving much faster than disc-playing capabilities are evolving. A two-year old unit may be perfectly functional as a disc player but have become nearly obsolete as a streaming device. It's ridiculous to have to replace a perfectly good disc player because it can't get Vudu or Hulu Plus or whatever you now wish for.

I have not changed my opinion that a dedicated streaming device is a better choice than a BD player for this functionality. Indeed, as more consumers become more deeply interested in streaming, they are beginning to find that BD players alone are often a second-tier solution, when compared to devices from companies like Roku, WD, etc that are supported and updated regularly by their manufacturers.

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Most movies will be via Streaming in the future. Music is already moving that way via subscription services. In 10 years do you really think you'll go down to the store and by a movie? There would be no need, if anything you'll buy a code to get a download. BD players are an interim to that end. Who still has a VHS player? I do, its in my closet and hasn't been turned on in 4 years. Streaming is just another "media" and once the new media gets widespread acceptance, the old media eventually dies out. LP's were an exception and made a comeback. But digital doesn't matter if its on a disc, sdcard, flash card, or downloaded directly. And gives the studios better control to help prevent piracy.
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post #404 of 408 Old 11-19-2010, 05:25 PM
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Most movies will be via Streaming in the future. Music is already moving that way via subscription services. In 10 years do you really think you'll go down to the store and by a movie? There would be no need, if anything you'll buy a code to get a download. BD players are an interim to that end. Who still has a VHS player? I do, its in my closet and hasn't been turned on in 4 years. Streaming is just another "media" and once the new media gets widespread acceptance, the old media eventually dies out. LP's were an exception and made a comeback. But digital doesn't matter if its on a disc, sdcard, flash card, or downloaded directly. And gives the studios better control to help prevent piracy.

Whoa, what an eye-opener!
If I waited 10 years for the next big thing I would never move out of my cave.
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post #405 of 408 Old 11-19-2010, 05:46 PM
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Most movies will be via Streaming in the future. Music is already moving that way via subscription services. In 10 years do you really think you'll go down to the store and by a movie? There would be no need, if anything you'll buy a code to get a download. BD players are an interim to that end. Who still has a VHS player? I do, its in my closet and hasn't been turned on in 4 years. Streaming is just another "media" and once the new media gets widespread acceptance, the old media eventually dies out. LP's were an exception and made a comeback. But digital doesn't matter if its on a disc, sdcard, flash card, or downloaded directly. And gives the studios better control to help prevent piracy.

No streaming source current or expected comes close to matching BD in audio/video quality. As long as there is a market for that quality -- and there always has been -- there will be a market for whatever format can deliver it. BD will be that format for the foreseeable future.

Streaming will undoubtedly replace physical media for much of the casual viewing market, including movie rentals. But there's another market -- collectors and home theater aficionados -- for whom streaming is no more adequate than VHS would be.

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post #406 of 408 Old 11-21-2010, 11:26 AM - Thread Starter
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No streaming source current or expected comes close to matching BD in audio/video quality. As long as there is a market for that quality -- and there always has been -- there will be a market for whatever format can deliver it. BD will be that format for the foreseeable future.

Streaming will undoubtedly replace physical media for much of the casual viewing market, including movie rentals. But there's another market -- collectors and home theater aficionados -- for whom streaming is no more adequate than VHS would be.

No one is disputing that blu-ray currently offers the best video and audio quality. However, streaming is a nice option to supplement blu-rays. Offering streaming on blu-ray players must be popular among consumers as seen by the market penetration. I still do not understand why so many people were opposed to this extra service being included on their blu-ray players. I do not want to own a separate streaming device as I already have too many devices in my A/V Center and my A/V Receiver only has so many inputs.

Posters on this forum use to post that there was a reason that Oppo and other manufacturers did not include streaming on their players. They can no longer even make that argument.
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post #407 of 408 Old 11-21-2010, 11:54 AM
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No streaming source current or expected comes close to matching BD in audio/video quality. As long as there is a market for that quality -- and there always has been -- there will be a market for whatever format can deliver it. BD will be that format for the foreseeable future.

Streaming will undoubtedly replace physical media for much of the casual viewing market, including movie rentals. But there's another market -- collectors and home theater aficionados -- for whom streaming is no more adequate than VHS would be.

JMO but what you're describing sounds to me like a niche market supported by a very limited number of hardware manufacturers (like the US market for DVD recorders that include HDDs). More important though, at least in my mind, is that what you call "the casual viewing market" may be where the real money is so that the decision on whether or not to even continue to make Bluray discs will become a no brainer. Like I said JMO.
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post #408 of 408 Old 11-24-2010, 09:26 PM - Thread Starter
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The new blu-ray players including the ones with apps appear to be very upgradeable when it comes to adding additional streaming services. I was very pleased that my Original 60GB PS3 received VUDU this week. Therefor, I do not believe that a dedicated streaming device is a better solution.
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