Official OPPO BDP-105 Owner's Thread - Page 298 - AVS Forum
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post #8911 of 11258 Old 01-27-2014, 04:00 PM
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I recently bought the oppo 105D. I am trying to use the oppo media control app, but am unable to browse my network when I chose a device it asks for userneame and password. My usual network passwords and username don't work. I am trying to access my htpc which is running windows 8.1. Any suggestions?
My username is a windows email address.

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post #8912 of 11258 Old 01-27-2014, 04:15 PM
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Originally Posted by BCWookie View Post

I recently bought the oppo 105D. I am trying to use the oppo media control app, but am unable to browse my network when I chose a device it asks for userneame and password. My usual network passwords and username don't work. I am trying to access my htpc which is running windows 8.1. Any suggestions?
My username is a windows email address.

My suggestion is to change OS's. Winblows 8 or 8.1 doesn't play well with OPPO. Of course, 8 is a bad OS.

With dual subs, stack'em in the corner and put on a jockstrap. Don't want EVERYTHING in the room jingling!
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post #8913 of 11258 Old 01-27-2014, 07:05 PM
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Other than for SMB support, there is nothing wrong with Win8 used with the Oppos. DLNA works just fine. Win8 is not a bad OS at all other than some kinds of SMB support. Some people just don't like its differences. Those differences don't bother me.

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post #8914 of 11258 Old 01-27-2014, 08:11 PM
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Is anyone else having crashing issues after the December firmware update.. I hadn't updated till now and ever since I have my system (every so often) freezing up or going to a black screen after HDMI switching (For example front to back). Only work around is to turn it off and on again.. Also had it freeze midway through a movie on me twice (brand new blu rays - no scratches) again only way was a hard restart to get back functionality. Starting to get really annoyed. Also my wireless has only worked once since purchasing the unit. In connects to my network then fails to connect within a matter of seconds I have 10 other devices and have tried it with 2 different routers to the same result.

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Video: Samsung 65in HU9000 UHD TV // Oppo BDP-105 Blu-ray player // Apple TV (3G)
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post #8915 of 11258 Old 01-27-2014, 08:52 PM
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Originally Posted by JazzGuyy View Post

Other than for SMB support, there is nothing wrong with Win8 used with the Oppos. DLNA works just fine. Win8 is not a bad OS at all other than some kinds of SMB support. Some people just don't like its differences. Those differences don't bother me.


What do you use for DNLA? Is there a way to use mediacontrol app for smb or DNLA on windows 8.1???

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post #8916 of 11258 Old 01-27-2014, 09:53 PM
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Originally Posted by BCWookie View Post

What do you use for DNLA? Is there a way to use mediacontrol app for smb or DNLA on windows 8.1???
The MediaControlHD app can only read a network drive (via smb), or a usb drive connected to the 105's serial port. Oppo doesn't support smb 3.0, which is what Windows 8.1 is using. DLNA is not supported by Oppo's app either. JRiver media center is a pretty good dlna control/server software. You can use JRemote on your iPad/iPhone to send(push) media files to the 105. You computer will need to be on, however, as that's where the media server is running. I'm using an embedded dlna media server on my Synology NAS, and can leave my computer off. The ios app I'm running is called 8Player. It finds any active dlna media servers on your home network, and utilizes it to push media files from your NAS to the 105.
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post #8917 of 11258 Old 01-27-2014, 10:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ahzari View Post

Is anyone else having crashing issues after the December firmware update.. I hadn't updated till now and ever since I have my system (every so often) freezing up or going to a black screen after HDMI switching (For example front to back). Only work around is to turn it off and on again.. Also had it freeze midway through a movie on me twice (brand new blu rays - no scratches) again only way was a hard restart to get back functionality. Starting to get really annoyed. Also my wireless has only worked once since purchasing the unit. In connects to my network then fails to connect within a matter of seconds I have 10 other devices and have tried it with 2 different routers to the same result.
Not sure if this would pertain to you, but I remember reading a post nearly 2 months ago stating the 105 no longer supported WEP encryption, and that WPA2 encryption would solve connection problems. I haven't locked up my 105 any more than it was locking up before the new firmware. I mostly stream my movies, only playing a blu-ray disc once on my player.
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post #8918 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 12:36 PM
 
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After reading numerous posts for the past couple of months on this forum and testing the recommendations, I'd have to say there is a better way to go than the responses posted here.

 

2.1 setup 

 

Use dedicated stereo outputs with stereo downmix selected in speaker configuration and for stereo signal. Set speakers to small and subwoofer on.  Select a crossover point. This recommendation is from Oppo. Sounds far better than fl/fr downmix and balances well with subwoofer. All the surround and center channel information is sent to the fl/fr speakers. No decoding necessary.

 

Crossover Point

 

Look in the speaker specs for the lowest point with no more than +/- 1.5db deviation. Add 10Hz and that is your crossover point. 

 

Bass Management

 

The Oppo does an excellent job of bass management. Unless you are calibrating speakers with a meter, there is no need to do anything.

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post #8919 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 01:57 PM
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Is there a guide for speaker level calibration with the Oppo 105? My Oppo is directly connected to my Amp.

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post #8920 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 02:21 PM
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Originally Posted by silverdream View Post

Is there a guide for speaker level calibration with the Oppo 105? My Oppo is directly connected to my Amp.

Pages 69-72 of the latest 105 manual.


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http://www.stereophile.com/category/music-round

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post #8921 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 02:39 PM
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I have Oppo 105D connected to Yamaha RX-V2700 (with RX-A2030 on order), using JRiver MC on Mac to stream music collection from home computer.

Two questions:
1. Is there a way to display the bit rate/file format of the streamed music on the Oppo? I tried several settings on the JRMC side, as well as "info" button on Oppo to no avail. Would be nice to see what I am listening to in terms of recording quality for comparison sake.

2. Native DSD (.dsf) files show up on the Oppo through JRMC, however when selected to play simply produce a low volume white noise. It is odd that Oppo can't handle these as when I put them as data files on a DVD and put them in the player they play beautifully. I think I picked up on this forum and/or JR Interact forum that Oppo can't handle the .dsf format streaming without a correct mimetype, but am not 100% sure of that. Any suggestions?

Some of relevant JRMC media server settings as of now are:
- Audio ==> Mode = "Original"
- Audio ==> Format = "PCM 24 bit"
- Advanced ==> Bitstream DSD = checked
- Advanced ==> Enable Bitstream Field = checked
- Advanced ==> Included Session ID = checked


Thanks in advance.
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post #8922 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 05:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebring1 View Post

After reading numerous posts for the past couple of months on this forum and testing the recommendations, I'd have to say there is a better way to go than the responses posted here.

2.1 setup 

Use dedicated stereo outputs with stereo downmix selected in speaker configuration and for stereo signal. Set speakers to small and subwoofer on.  Select a crossover point. This recommendation is from Oppo. Sounds far better than fl/fr downmix and balances well with subwoofer. All the surround and center channel information is sent to the fl/fr speakers. No decoding necessary.
...
Your speaker configuration settings on the 105 are not active when you set the Stereo signal to "Downmixed Stereo" and use the dedicated stereo outputs. You don't get any bass management nor does it matter what your speaker size is...it won't have any effect on your dedicated stereo outputs.
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post #8923 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 06:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Javaruke View Post

I have Oppo 105D connected to Yamaha RX-V2700 (with RX-A2030 on order), using JRiver MC on Mac to stream music collection from home computer.

Two questions:
1. Is there a way to display the bit rate/file format of the streamed music on the Oppo? I tried several settings on the JRMC side, as well as "info" button on Oppo to no avail. Would be nice to see what I am listening to in terms of recording quality for comparison sake.

I'm in the same boat as you, except I'm using Foobar2000 as a controller to stream music from my NAS to the Oppo. It's been a hell of a learning curve learning about UPNP and DLNA (and I'm still confused). I have the same issue as you. It seems the Oppo doesn't show any information about the file. Heck, sometimes it shows name of track and artist and sometimes it doesn't. Foobar shows all the information about the file being streamed (bit rate, sampling rate, etc.) It could be because the file is being streamed rather than the file being sent to Oppo. I remember Bob making a comment about that some time ago.

Although I got Foobar working well, I'm thinking about switching to JRiver. When Foobar sends/streams a file via UPNP, it bypasses it's own controls, so I don't get the cool looking spectograms and VU meters displayed in Foobar like I used to when just streaming via HDMI. I'm also having problems with creating multiple playlists since I have to use a separate UPNP browser in Foobar. I'm hoping Jriver solves those issues with a nice interface.

Haven't tried DSD files yet, so I can't comment on that.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanF8500 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebring1 View Post

After reading numerous posts for the past couple of months on this forum and testing the recommendations, I'd have to say there is a better way to go than the responses posted here.

2.1 setup 

Use dedicated stereo outputs with stereo downmix selected in speaker configuration and for stereo signal. Set speakers to small and subwoofer on.  Select a crossover point. This recommendation is from Oppo. Sounds far better than fl/fr downmix and balances well with subwoofer. All the surround and center channel information is sent to the fl/fr speakers. No decoding necessary.
...
Your speaker configuration settings on the 105 are not active when you set the Stereo signal to "Downmixed Stereo" and use the dedicated stereo outputs. You don't get any bass management nor does it matter what your speaker size is...it won't have any effect on your dedicated stereo outputs.

Not true. You select your crossover point and the sound below that level is sent to the subwoofer and the sound above goes to the main speakers. LFE goes to the subwoofer. Bass management. 

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post #8925 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 06:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Sebring1 View Post

Not true. You select your crossover point and the sound below that level is sent to the subwoofer and the sound above goes to the main speakers. LFE goes to the subwoofer. Bass management. 
Those settings don't apply to the dedicated stereo outputs unless they've been configured as the front left/right speakers in the setup menu. So in the configuration you're suggesting, the left and right speakers would get a full range signal regardless of the crossover setting. The subwoofer output will be affected by the speaker size and crossover settings though.
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post #8926 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 06:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebring1 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by DanF8500 View Post

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebring1 View Post

After reading numerous posts for the past couple of months on this forum and testing the recommendations, I'd have to say there is a better way to go than the responses posted here.


2.1 setup 


Use dedicated stereo outputs with stereo downmix selected in speaker configuration and for stereo signal. Set speakers to small and subwoofer on.  Select a crossover point. This recommendation is from Oppo. Sounds far better than fl/fr downmix and balances well with subwoofer. All the surround and center channel information is sent to the fl/fr speakers. No decoding necessary.

...
Your speaker configuration settings on the 105 are not active when you set the Stereo signal to "Downmixed Stereo" and use the dedicated stereo outputs. You don't get any bass management nor does it matter what your speaker size is...it won't have any effect on your dedicated stereo outputs.
Not true. You select your crossover point and the sound below that level is sent to the subwoofer and the sound above goes to the main speakers. LFE goes to the subwoofer. Bass management. 

You are BOTH kinda-sorta right.

With Stereo Signal DOWN-MIXED STEREO, the Dedicated Stereo Analog Outputs are treated as LARGE -- no Crossover processing. The full frequency range goes out each of the L/R channels.

HOWEVER, the *SUBWOOFER* jack is actually part of the MULTI-CHANNEL Analog output set. So if you set LF/RF SMALL in the Multi-Channel speaker configuration, and set Subwoofer ON, and select a Crossover frequency, then when playing stereo content, steered bass from the LF/RF channels of the multi-channel set will go out the Subwoofer output jack. This is true even though that LF/RF jack pair is not cabled.

So yes, you will get a signal on the Subwoofer jack, but no, this is not the CORRECT setup.

Why? Because the bass is going to be present on *BOTH* the Subwoofer jack and on the L/R jacks of the Dedicated Stereo Analog set! You will be getting "double bass", and you will have problems (1) properly setting levels to match bass to the rest of the content in the L/R channels and (2) getting the Crossover to work right because although bass is rolling into the Subwoofer as you go down in frequency it is NOT rolling off of the signal going to the Dedicated Stereo Analog jacks.



So what's correct?

CORRECT is to use Stereo Signal FRONT LEFT/RIGHT. This configures the Dedicated Stereo Analog L/R pairs (both the RCA pair and the XLR pair) to respond to whatever settings normally affect the LF/RF pair of the multi-channel set.

Wire Subwoofer from the multi-channel set and also L/R from the Dedicated Stereo Analog set. Set LF/RF SMALL and Subwoofer ON in the multi-channel Speaker Configuration. Set Down-mix STEREO in the multi-channel Speaker Configuration. IMPORTANT NOTE: Do not confuse this "Speaker Configuration > Down-mix" setting (STEREO in this case) with the "Stereo Signal" setting (FRONT LEFT/RIGHT in this case).

Now when you play stereo content, the L/R jacks of the Dedicated Stereo Analog set will get proper Crossover processing, with bass still steered to the Subwoofer jack of the multi-channel set. The bass steered to the Subwoofer via the Crossover will *NOT* also be sent out the L/R jacks.

Be sure to use a calibration disc and an SPL meter to level balance the speakers and sub. With the LF/RF pair set to SMALL like this, the Subwoofer jack will need +15dB boost to match the RCA jacks for the main speakers (e.g., the L/R RCA jacks of the Dedicated Stereo Analog set). If you use the XLR jacks from the Dedicated Stereo Analog set, the Subwoofer jack will need an extra +6dB boost to match -- +21dB boost altogether. DO THIS BOOST USING THE VOLUME KNOB ON THE SUB ITSELF -- not in the speaker Volume Trim settings in the multi-channel analog Speaker Configuration settings of the OPPO.

If you play multi-channel content in this configuration, any LFE channel content will go out the Subwoofer jack ALONG WITH bass steered from the SMALL speakers. You will also get a "stereo" down-mix.
--Bob
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post #8927 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 06:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gsr View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebring1 View Post

Not true. You select your crossover point and the sound below that level is sent to the subwoofer and the sound above goes to the main speakers. LFE goes to the subwoofer. Bass management. 
Those settings don't apply to the dedicated stereo outputs unless they've been configured as the front left/right speakers in the setup menu. So in the configuration you're suggesting, the left and right speakers would get a full range signal regardless of the crossover setting. The subwoofer output will be affected by the speaker size and crossover settings though.

Not true unless you are using a stereo source. A stereo source will only play through the main speakers at full range and will send nothing to the subwoofer. The LFE channel only plays through the subwoofer. 

 

Try it. Select different crossover points and listen. The sound below your crossover point will move to the subwoofer and be removed from the main speakers. 

 

I asked Oppo how to do a 2.1 setup and their response was to use the dedicated stereo outputs and the subwoofer output. Select a crossover point, set main speakers to small, turn sub on and set downmix stereo in speaker configuration and also in stereo signal.

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post #8928 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 07:04 PM
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^ Here is the correct answer, direct from OPPO's Knowledge Base for the 105:

http://www.oppodigital.com/KnowledgeBase.aspx?KBID=15

Note that TWO configurations are described, with the second one specifically for people who think "double bass" (bass in BOTH the Subwoofer and the main speakers) is a good thing.
The recommended -- and normal -- configuration is the first one shown. I.e., with Stereo Signal set to FRONT LEFT/RIGHT.
--Bob

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post #8929 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 07:04 PM
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Although I got Foobar working well, I'm thinking about switching to JRiver. When Foobar sends/streams a file via UPNP, it bypasses it's own controls, so I don't get the cool looking spectograms and VU meters displayed in Foobar like I used to when just streaming via HDMI. I'm also having problems with creating multiple playlists since I have to use a separate UPNP browser in Foobar. I'm hoping Jriver solves those issues with a nice interface.

When using an HTPC and Foobar connected via HDMI, the PC is "playing" the file and not streaming it. The PC is effectively using the HDMI audio as an "audio device" (think "pseudo sound card") and the software that is playing the media thinks that it is talking to a sound card. The fact that this particular sound card is really just a proxy for whatever DAC is at the other end of the HDMI connection is transparent to the software and therefore irrelevant. It is the act of "playing" the media that enables foobar to give you those nice displays when you use HDMI for the audio.

When using DLNA, all the server is doing is streaming the contents of a file over your network, in the same way that Netflix streams the contents of a movie file over the network. The software is talking to a network device, not a sound device. The server from which the content is streamed is not "playing" the file. It is not looking at the contents other than to copy them from the file to a network buffer. It is not interpreting them in any way (unless you are transcoding, which comes with an entire other set of complications). As such, you will never get that nice display on DLNA that you get from foobar when you use HDMI. it does not matter what server you use.

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Receiver: Pioneer Elite SC-77 AVR (9.2)
Sources: Oppo BDP-103, Roku 3, Cable...
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Quote:
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebring1 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanF8500 View Post

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebring1 View Post

After reading numerous posts for the past couple of months on this forum and testing the recommendations, I'd have to say there is a better way to go than the responses posted here.


2.1 setup 


Use dedicated stereo outputs with stereo downmix selected in speaker configuration and for stereo signal. Set speakers to small and subwoofer on.  Select a crossover point. This recommendation is from Oppo. Sounds far better than fl/fr downmix and balances well with subwoofer. All the surround and center channel information is sent to the fl/fr speakers. No decoding necessary.

...
Your speaker configuration settings on the 105 are not active when you set the Stereo signal to "Downmixed Stereo" and use the dedicated stereo outputs. You don't get any bass management nor does it matter what your speaker size is...it won't have any effect on your dedicated stereo outputs.
Not true. You select your crossover point and the sound below that level is sent to the subwoofer and the sound above goes to the main speakers. LFE goes to the subwoofer. Bass management. 

You are BOTH kinda-sorta right.

With Stereo Signal DOWN-MIXED STEREO, the Dedicated Stereo Analog Outputs are treated as LARGE -- no Crossover processing. The full frequency range goes out each of the L/R channels.

HOWEVER, the *SUBWOOFER* jack is actually part of the MULTI-CHANNEL Analog output set. So if you set LF/RF SMALL in the Multi-Channel speaker configuration, and set Subwoofer ON, and select a Crossover frequency, then when playing stereo content, steered bass from the LF/RF channels of the multi-channel set will go out the Subwoofer output jack. This is true even though that LF/RF jack pair is not cabled.

So yes, you will get a signal on the Subwoofer jack, but no, this is not the CORRECT setup.

Why? Because the bass is going to be present on *BOTH* the Subwoofer jack and on the L/R jacks of the Dedicated Stereo Analog set! You will be getting "double bass", and you will have problems (1) properly setting levels to match bass to the rest of the content in the L/R channels and (2) getting the Crossover to work right because although bass is rolling into the Subwoofer as you go down in frequency it is NOT rolling off of the signal going to the Dedicated Stereo Analog jacks.
 

So what's correct?

CORRECT is to use Stereo Signal FRONT LEFT/RIGHT. This configures the Dedicated Stereo Analog L/R pairs (both the RCA pair and the XLR pair) to respond to whatever settings normally affect the LF/RF pair of the multi-channel set.

Wire Subwoofer from the multi-channel set and also L/R from the Dedicated Stereo Analog set. Set LF/RF SMALL and Subwoofer ON in the multi-channel Speaker Configuration. Set Down-mix STEREO in the multi-channel Speaker Configuration. IMPORTANT NOTE: Do not confuse this "Speaker Configuration > Down-mix" setting (STEREO in this case) with the "Stereo Signal" setting (FRONT LEFT/RIGHT in this case).

Now when you play stereo content, the L/R jacks of the Dedicated Stereo Analog set will get proper Crossover processing, with bass still steered to the Subwoofer jack of the multi-channel set. The bass steered to the Subwoofer via the Crossover will *NOT* also be sent out the L/R jacks.

Be sure to use a calibration disc and an SPL meter to level balance the speakers and sub. With the LF/RF pair set to SMALL like this, the Subwoofer jack will need +15dB boost to match the RCA jacks for the main speakers (e.g., the L/R RCA jacks of the Dedicated Stereo Analog set). If you use the XLR jacks from the Dedicated Stereo Analog set, the Subwoofer jack will need an extra +6dB boost to match -- +21dB boost altogether. DO THIS BOOST USING THE VOLUME KNOB ON THE SUB ITSELF -- not in the speaker Volume Trim settings in the multi-channel analog Speaker Configuration settings of the OPPO.

If you play multi-channel content in this configuration, any LFE channel content will go out the Subwoofer jack ALONG WITH bass steered from the SMALL speakers. You will also get a "stereo" down-mix.
--Bob

I agree this would work for a stereo signal. How does this affect a 5.1 or 7.1 source? I am not using any stereo sources.

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post #8931 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 07:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Kal Rubinson View Post

Pages 69-72 of the latest 105 manual.

I have followed the manual to set the speaker size and distance from the main listening point. I couldn't find any info in the manual about speaker level. Maybe I missed something. Online blogs indicate that I pick a reference volume (0db) in the receiver (in my case Oppo 105) and then increase or decrease the trim levels on all speakers to match (using SPL meter) 85/75db when playing the test tone. The recommendation for subwoofer is +10db (95DB).

If I follow this approach, what is 0db on the Oppo?

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post #8932 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 07:08 PM
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I agree this would work for a stereo signal. How does this affect a 5.1 or 7.1 source? I am not using any stereo sources.

See the Knowledge Base article I posted just above.

For 5.1 and 7.1 content played in this configuration (i.e., using Stereo Signal FRONT LEFT/RIGHT), LFE Channel content goes to the Subwoofer jack. Steered bass from the SMALL speakers ALSO goes to the Subwoofer jack via the Crossover.

In addition, you get "down-mix attenuation" -- a reduction in volume to allow headroom for mixing of the Center and Surround content channels into the L/R channels without risking clipping the input of your pre-amp.

The down-mix attenuation is applied to all channels (including Subwoofer) -- and you can counter it by raising main Volume on the OPPO, so long as you are careful not to raise Volume beyond what the inputs of your pre-amp can accept without clipping.
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post #8933 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 07:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

^ Here is the correct answer, direct from OPPO's Knowledge Base for the 105:

http://www.oppodigital.com/KnowledgeBase.aspx?KBID=15

Note that TWO configurations are described, with the second one specifically for people who think "double bass" (bass in BOTH the Subwoofer and the main speakers) is a good thing.
The recommended -- and normal -- configuration is the first one shown. I.e., with Stereo Signal set to FRONT LEFT/RIGHT.
--Bob

So its recommended to do this even if the RCAs are connected to a amplifier and speakers connected to that? Right now I just have everything on stock configuration and down mixed stereo. Also do you recommend audio be on PCM or bitstream?

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post #8934 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 07:38 PM
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Originally Posted by silverdream View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kal Rubinson View Post

Pages 69-72 of the latest 105 manual.

I have followed the manual to set the speaker size and distance from the main listening point. I couldn't find any info in the manual about speaker level. Maybe I missed something. Online blogs indicate that I pick a reference volume (0db) in the receiver (in my case Oppo 105) and then increase or decrease the trim levels on all speakers to match (using SPL meter) 85/75db when playing the test tone. The recommendation for subwoofer is +10db (95DB).

If I follow this approach, what is 0db on the Oppo?

Volume on the 105 is full scale at 100 and 1/2dB down for each step below that. I.e., Volume 50 is -25dB below full output.

The absolute level you will get when connected directly to a power amp depends on the gain of the amp and the efficiency of the speakers. Contrast with use of a pre-amp or AVR where you have a volume knob which translates between full scale from the source device and output to the speakers, but with an extra set of speaker volume trims in between so you can establish a "convenient" relationship between the pre-amp volume knob setting and the absolute output of your speakers.

Forget about that 0db stuff. It doesn't apply when you are connecting direct to an amp.

Instead get a calibration disc. I recommend the LPCM test tracks found on AIX Audio Calibration Blu-ray. Play the track that matches your speaker configuration (2.0, 5.1, 7.1). Set the volume trim for every speaker to 0dB in Speaker Configuration.

While listening to the test tone on the Left Front speaker, adjust the main Volume on the OPPO (NOT the speaker trim value for Left Front, which you will leave at 0dB) until you get 75dB SPL at your main listening position. Set the SPL meter to Slow response and "C" weighting. Hold it pointing straight up at arm's length and at seated ear height but away from reflecting or blocking surfaces like seat backs.

Note that OPPO Volume setting which gets you 75dB SPL from Left Front. That's your 0dB equivalent if you will, although again that's not really important. What's important is that this Volume setting is your "calibrated" volume setting for home theater use. Up or down from there in main Volume differs from the calibrated setting for all speakers.

Again, the volume trim for LF is still at 0dB -- you are instead adjusting the main Volume for the OPPO.

Now WITHOUT changing that main Volume setting, check the output of each of the other speakers. Adjust their volume trim setting (not main Volume) until they, too, show 75dB SPL. That matches all the speakers to Left Front, and all speakers are also set to the calibrated level at this same main Volume setting you found above.

That just leaves the Subwoofer. Again, you are going to adjust it for 75dB SPL. But in THIS case you don't do it with controls on the OPPO. Instead you do it with the volume knob on the Subwoofer itself. Again, your main Volume "calibrated" level setting (found above) will now generate 75dB on each speaker and on the Sub. For the other speakers it is done by adjusting their volume trim in the OPPO. For the Subwoofer it is done by adjusting the volume knob on the sub itself.

Obviously if you have a 2.0 speaker configuration, there is no Sub to adjust. If you have a 5.1 or 7.1 speaker configuration you do this with the 5.1 or 7.1 LPCM track from the AIX disc.

If you have set up an "in between" speaker configuration -- such as selecting 5.1 for your down-mix but then also turning Center to OFF to make a 4.1 configuration, then you can still use the 5.1 track to do this. Ignore the tones from the speakers that don't actually exist (Center in this case). And understand that the base level of output will be reduced by down-mix attenuation (so that Center can be mixed into LF/RF without clipping). So you can still use this to calibrate to 75dB -- and that will even be accurate when you play 5.1 content. But when you play 2.0 content the output from the player will be louder at that same main Volume level (since there is no down-mix attenuation). And when you play 7.1 content the output of the player will be softer since there is MORE down-mix attenuation.

You can do the math if you really want to find out how to get to an actual 75dB level for each type of content, but really what you are going to do is adjust main Volume for each type of content to get a pleasing listening level. The "calibrated" level is not as important as getting a pleasing volume level.

What's IMPORTANT is that the output channels are matched in Volume, and the method above does that.

Let's take an example: Suppose you have a 2.1 speaker configuration (L/R/Sub). The 2.0 test track won't produce a tone specifically for Sub so how do you calibrate Sub?

What you do is play the 5.1 track and ignore the test tones designed to play on Center, Left Surround, and Right Surround. Just pay attention to the test tones for Left / Right/ and Sub. Again the idea is to get THOSE THREE to match in volume using the method above. If you DO listen to the Center tone you will find it is also close to a match (automatically due to the level settings for Left and Rght). But if you listen to Left Surround and Right Surround you will find they are SOFTER than your calibration level. Why? Because those channels are carrying content that's supposed to be behind you. If they were blended into Left and Right at full volume that would give false emphasis to the ambient sound in them. There's standard math for how channels down mix, and trust me this all works. The point is, when setting levels you ONLY measure the tones for the speakers that actually exist in your setup.

In addition, since you are playing a 5.1 track in a 2.1 configuration, the player will be applying down-mix attenuation. That means the main Volume setting that gets 75B SPL on Left (when playing this 5.1 track) will produce MORE volume on Left when playing a STEREO track -- since there is no down-mix needed when playing 2.0 content into 2.1 speakers.



ETA: IMPORTANT NOTE

Note that you are adjusting the Sub output to the SAME SPL level as the main speakers -- not 10dB hotter or even more.

Technically what's going on is that the Sub output jack carries a signal that is deliberately scaled below the output levels of the main speaker jacks. I'll skip over WHY that is happening -- just trust me that it's done for a good reason.

And THAT means the signal needs to be BOOSTED to match the signal level of the other speaker jacks. Depending on how you have things set up, the needed boost will be +10dB or +15dB or +21dB. But understand that you don't have to WORRY about this complexity. All you have to do is adjust the volume knob ON THE SUB ITSELF to match the Sub output to the same calibrated level (75dB SPL) as the main speakers and you will be done. The correct boost needed is baked into that volume knob setting you end up using on the sub itself.

If you change the NUMBER of speakers you have configured, or whether all of them are LARGE vs. any of them SMALL, you need to re-establish the correct Sub volume knob setting.

But so long as you don't change your speaker configuration, you do NOT have to twiddle or adjust anything just because you have decided to play stereo content now vs. 5.1 or 7.1 content later or whatever. The OPPO adjusts automatically to the nature of the content you are playing once you've got your speaker levels set properly to begin with.
--Bob
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post #8935 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 07:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Ahzari View Post

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Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

^ Here is the correct answer, direct from OPPO's Knowledge Base for the 105:

http://www.oppodigital.com/KnowledgeBase.aspx?KBID=15

Note that TWO configurations are described, with the second one specifically for people who think "double bass" (bass in BOTH the Subwoofer and the main speakers) is a good thing.
The recommended -- and normal -- configuration is the first one shown. I.e., with Stereo Signal set to FRONT LEFT/RIGHT.
--Bob

So its recommended to do this even if the RCAs are connected to a amplifier and speakers connected to that? Right now I just have everything on stock configuration and down mixed stereo. Also do you recommend audio be on PCM or bitstream?

The LPCM vs. Bitstream choice is for DIGITAL audio output (such as over HDMI). If you are using the ANALOG audio outputs the player must, necessarily always do the decoding. Decoding has to happen before the digital signal can be converted to Analog. So the Analog audio outputs always work "as if" LPCM was selected -- regardless of what's actually selected for digital audio over HDMI.

That Knowledge Base article is describing how to set up a 2.1 output configuration using the Analog outputs of the 105 -- and when you want to take advantage of the enhanced signal path of the Dedicated Stereo Analog outputs while doing that.

Whether the outputs are connected direct to an amp (and sub) or through a pre-amp or AVR is irrelevant to this choice.

But understand that this is for an Analog output configuration. If you are using Digital audio such as HDMI to an AVR then speaker configuration choices like this are made IN THE AVR, not in the OPPO. The settings we've been talking about here (Stereo Signal, Crossover, and the various Speaker Configuration menu settings) only affect the ANALOG outputs of the player.
--Bob
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post #8936 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 08:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

Volume on the 105 is full scale at 100 and 1/2dB down for each step below that. I.e., Volume 50 is -25dB below full output.

The absolute level you will get when connected directly to a power amp depends on the gain of the amp and the efficiency of the speakers. Contrast with use of a pre-amp or AVR where you have a volume knob which translates between full scale from the source device and output to the speakers, but with an extra set of speaker volume trims in between so you can establish a "convenient" relationship between the pre-amp volume knob setting and the absolute output of your speakers.

Forget about that 0db stuff. It doesn't apply when you are connecting direct to an amp.

Instead get a calibration disc. I recommend the LPCM test tracks found on AIX Audio Calibration Blu-ray. Play the track that matches your speaker configuration (2.0, 5.1, 7.1). Set the volume trim for every speaker to 0dB in Speaker Configuration.

While listening to the test tone on the Left Front speaker, adjust the main Volume on the OPPO (NOT the speaker trim value for Left Front, which you will leave at 0dB) until you get 75dB SPL at your main listening position. Set the SPL meter to Slow response and "C" weighting. Hold it pointing straight up at arm's length and at seated ear height but away from reflecting or blocking surfaces like seat backs.

Note that OPPO Volume setting which gets you 75dB SPL from Left Front. That's your 0dB equivalent if you will, although again that's not really important. What's important is that this Volume setting is your "calibrated" volume setting for home theater use. Up or down from there in main Volume differs from the calibrated setting for all speakers.

Again, the volume trim for LF is still at 0dB -- you are instead adjusting the main Volume for the OPPO.

Now WITHOUT changing that main Volume setting, check the output of each of the other speakers. Adjust their volume trim setting (not main Volume) until they, too, show 75dB SPL. That matches all the speakers to Left Front, and all speakers are also set to the calibrated level at this same main Volume setting you found above.

That just leaves the Subwoofer. Again, you are going to adjust it for 75dB SPL. But in THIS case you don't do it with controls on the OPPO. Instead you do it with the volume knob on the Subwoofer itself. Again, your main Volume "calibrated" level setting (found above) will now generate 75dB on each speaker and on the Sub. For the other speakers it is done by adjusting their volume trim in the OPPO. For the Subwoofer it is done by adjusting the volume knob on the sub itself.

Obviously if you have a 2.0 speaker configuration, there is no Sub to adjust. If you have a 5.1 or 7.1 speaker configuration you do this with the 5.1 or 7.1 LPCM track from the AIX disc.

If you have set up an "in between" speaker configuration -- such as selecting 5.1 for your down-mix but then also turning Center to OFF to make a 4.1 configuration, then you can still use the 5.1 track to do this. Ignore the tones from the speakers that don't actually exist (Center in this case). And understand that the base level of output will be reduced by down-mix attenuation (so that Center can be mixed into LF/RF without clipping). So you can still use this to calibrate to 75dB -- and that will even be accurate when you play 5.1 content. But when you play 2.0 content the output from the player will be louder at that same main Volume level (since there is no down-mix attenuation). And when you play 7.1 content the output of the player will be softer since there is MORE down-mix attenuation.

You can do the math if you really want to find out how to get to an actual 75dB level for each type of content, but really what you are going to do is adjust main Volume for each type of content to get a pleasing listening level. The "calibrated" level is not as important as getting a pleasing volume level.

What's IMPORTANT is that the output channels are matched in Volume, and the method above does that.

Let's take an example: Suppose you have a 2.1 speaker configuration (L/R/Sub). The 2.0 test track won't produce a tone specifically for Sub so how do you calibrate Sub?

What you do is play the 5.1 track and ignore the test tones designed to play on Center, Left Surround, and Right Surround. Just pay attention to the test tones for Left / Right/ and Sub. Again the idea is to get THOSE THREE to match in volume using the method above. If you DO listen to the Center tone you will find it is also close to a match (automatically due to the level settings for Left and Rght). But if you listen to Left Surround and Right Surround you will find they are SOFTER than your calibration level. Why? Because those channels are carrying content that's supposed to be behind you. If they were blended into Left and Right at full volume that would give false emphasis to the ambient sound in them. There's standard math for how channels down mix, and trust me this all works. The point is, when setting levels you ONLY measure the tones for the speakers that actually exist in your setup.

In addition, since you are playing a 5.1 track in a 2.1 configuration, the player will be applying down-mix attenuation. That means the main Volume setting that gets 75B SPL on Left (when playing this 5.1 track) will produce MORE volume on Left when playing a STEREO track -- since there is no down-mix needed when playing 2.0 content into 2.1 speakers.



ETA: IMPORTANT NOTE

Note that you are adjusting the Sub output to the SAME SPL level as the main speakers -- not 10dB hotter or even more.

Technically what's going on is that the Sub output jack carries a signal that is deliberately scaled below the output levels of the main speaker jacks. I'll skip over WHY that is happening -- just trust me that it's done for a good reason.

And THAT means the signal needs to be BOOSTED to match the signal level of the other speaker jacks. Depending on how you have things set up, the needed boost will be +10dB or +15dB or +21dB. But understand that you don't have to WORRY about this complexity. All you have to do is adjust the volume knob ON THE SUB ITSELF to match the Sub output to the same calibrated level (75dB SPL) as the main speakers and you will be done. The correct boost needed is baked into that volume knob setting you end up using on the sub itself.

If you change the NUMBER of speakers you have configured, or whether all of them are LARGE vs. any of them SMALL, you need to re-establish the correct Sub volume knob setting.

But so long as you don't change your speaker configuration, you do NOT have to twiddle or adjust anything just because you have decided to play stereo content now vs. 5.1 or 7.1 content later or whatever. The OPPO adjusts automatically to the nature of the content you are playing once you've got your speaker levels set properly to begin with.
--Bob

Bob,

Really appreciate your extremely clear, detailed, thoughtful response. I will try this one out. My setup is a 5.1 and have set the same in the OPPO. I have currently set the distance from the main listening point and size of the speaker (to small) in OPPO. I assume this is OK before I start with the level calibration.

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post #8937 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 08:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

The LPCM vs. Bitstream choice is for DIGITAL audio output (such as over HDMI). If you are using the ANALOG audio outputs the player must, necessarily always do the decoding. Decoding has to happen before the digital signal can be converted to Analog. So the Analog audio outputs always work "as if" LPCM was selected -- regardless of what's actually selected for digital audio over HDMI.

That Knowledge Base article is describing how to set up a 2.1 output configuration using the Analog outputs of the 105 -- and when you want to take advantage of the enhanced signal path of the Dedicated Stereo Analog outputs while doing that.

Whether the outputs are connected direct to an amp (and sub) or through a pre-amp or AVR is irrelevant to this choice.

But understand that this is for an Analog output configuration. If you are using Digital audio such as HDMI to an AVR then speaker configuration choices like this are made IN THE AVR, not in the OPPO. The settings we've been talking about here (Stereo Signal, Crossover, and the various Speaker Configuration menu settings) only affect the ANALOG outputs of the player.
--Bob

Thanks Bob, this would be via the Analog outputs - ill look into the knowledge base article and apply those settings.

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Bob, I have a followup question for you regarding your speaker SPL calibration explanation above.

If one's multi-channel speakers have different sensitivity ratings, would it be better to start your SPL calibration with the least sensitive speaker pair first? This would prevent needing to elevate trim settings to your other higher sensitive speakers. I just wanted to ensure I wasn't introducing distortion in the audio path if I have to increase trim levels too much.
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post #8939 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 09:08 PM
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Bob, I have a followup question for you regarding your speaker calibration explanation above.

If one's multi-channel speakers have different sensitivity ratings, would it be better to start your calibration to 75db spl with the least sensitive speaker first, setting it's trim to 0? This would prevent needing to elevate to your other higher sensitive speakers. I just wanted to ensure I wasn't introducing distortion in the audio path if I have to increase the trim level too much.

It's only an issue if your pre-amp (or amp inputs) have limited headroom. For simplicity do it as I stated (LF left at 0dB trim). If the result leaves any speakers with positive trim, then see if you can hear distortion in louder passages (at louder main Volume settings) which goes away if you lower main Volume for the same passages. If so go back into the speaker trims and lower ALL of them by the same amount so that the largest trim value is 0dB and the rest are negative.

Then test for that distortion again. You might not have to lower the set of them that entire amount -- you can experiment. Just keep them changed in tandem.
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post #8940 of 11258 Old 01-28-2014, 09:13 PM
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Bob,

Really appreciate your extremely clear, detailed, thoughtful response. I will try this one out. My setup is a 5.1 and have set the same in the OPPO. I have currently set the distance from the main listening point and size of the speaker (to small) in OPPO. I assume this is OK before I start with the level calibration.

Yes it is OK to have the speakers SMALL while doing this, but keep in mind that your choice of Crossover frequency will come into play here -- along with whether you've got your Sub in proper Phase with the main speakers. So as you get around to setting Phase on the Sub and honing in on the Crossover frequency you like best, recheck your levels and tweak them as needed. Start with a Crossover of 80Hz as that's the best "one size fits all" choice until you find reason to change it to something that works better.
--Bob
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