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post #1 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 09:33 AM - Thread Starter
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Panasonic DMP-BDT460 Blu-ray Player Review



Mark Henninger reviews Panasonic's latest UHD/4K upscaling Blu-ray player, featuring UHD/4K playback of JPEGs and dual HDMI outputs.

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The Panasonic DMP-BDT460 costs a little bit more than budget-oriented Blu-ray players, but it justifies its price with a rich feature set and snappy performance. Before I get into the user experience, I'd like to complement the overall appearance and build quality of this unit. Even though it's plastic, the DMP-BDT460 has an upscale appearance thanks to a brushed-metallic finish and a one-piece faceplate that hides the disc drawer, USB port, and SD card slot. It's a clean, modern design that wouldn't look out of place in a stack of high-end AV gear. I certainly won't knock Panasonic for using plastic, considering that the far more expensive Kaleidescape Cinema One that I demoed for couple of months is also housed in a plastic chassis.


Panasonic's DMP-BDT460 looks good. The front faceplate flips down when the disc drawer opens.

A few weeks ago, I began the review process on a Panasonic TC-65AX800U UHD/4K TV. Since it's the first UHD/4K device I've used for any extended period, it provided a window into the joys and challenges facing early UHD/4K adopters. Lack of content is a real issue, especially when it comes to television and movies. Things are better if you have a PC, thanks to YouTube, video games, and photo slideshows.

As I spent some time with the AX800U, I quickly realized that photo slideshows are one of the best uses for UHD/4K. Unlike movies, where the limited motion resolution of LCD panels interferes with how much detail you can really see during an action scene, still photos allow the viewer to see UHD/4K in all its glory.

Today's Blu-ray players are workhorses, serving as the foundation of countless home-entertainment systems. A good Blu-ray player is still a must-have for any home-theater setup, even as streaming video gains in popularity. Even though I’ve tried many of the latest dedicated streaming devices—Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Google, Chromecast, and Roku—I continue to use a Blu-ray player as my primary source for cloud-based AV content.

Blu-ray offers pristine 1080p image fidelity, but it can be a pain to deal with discs—especially when using a sluggish player. Some Blu-ray players are quite slow when it comes to disc handling, but unless you have a Kaleidescape system or a Blu-ray changer, dealing with physical discs is a necessity. To that end, I've come to appreciate Blu-ray players that offer fast loading times and otherwise snappy performance.

Aside from a Kaleidescape Cinema One system that I reviewed a few months back, my primary Blu-ray player is a Sony BDP-S5100. I also have a copy of CyberLink PowerDVD 14 on my HTPC, and in the past, I've used a PS3 as my Blu-ray source. Among those options, the DMP-BDT460 is the best performer when it comes to speed of operation, and overall, it strikes me as a slightly nicer AV appliance than my Sony.

From the startup to disc loading to menu access, the Panasonic player did not waste any of my time. Granted, the Kaleidescape Cinema One pulls off a neat trick, bypassing all the ads and warnings typically found at the beginning of Blu-ray discs and getting the viewer straight into the movie. But that the capability comes at a hefty premium: $3000 for the Cinema One, which is over 15 times more expensive than the Panasonic player.

Despite my recent declaration that I "gave up" on Blu-ray discs, the truth is I still occasionally watch them. On the other hand, I don't go out of my way to watch a Blu-ray instead of a streaming format. I appreciate the extra bit of quality that Blu-ray squeezes out of many movies, yet I also enjoy the convenience of browsing a large catalog of films online and the instant gratification that comes with streaming an impulsive movie selection.

Modern Blu-ray players often act as media portals, and that flexibility keeps me from using streaming-only platforms such as Roku, Chromecast, Apple TV, and Amazon Fire TV—it's redundant. I've used each and every one of those devices at some point or another in the past year, yet I keep going back to my trusty S5100 to access cloud-based content because it offers Vudu, Netflix, and Amazon streaming—the services of greatest importance to me.

I was psyched to try out the DMP-BDT460 in the role of online streamer. That's when I discovered what I consider a major omission: There is no Amazon app. That's a big deal for me because I am an Amazon Prime member, which buys me access to a sizeable library of high-quality streaming content. If I want to watch an older movie, the first place I check is Amazon Prime, because Amazon's HD streams typically outperform Netflix HD in terms of image quality.


I expected to find an Amazon app on this screen, hopefully Panasonic adds it in the future.

Fortunately, the DMP-BDT460 does include Vudu, the streaming service I use most frequently. There are plenty of additional apps available in Panasonic's Marketplace, including a couple of adult apps. The interface itself is very clean and easy to navigate, and customizable. I prefer it to Sony's interface, which is borrowed from the PS3 and requires a lot more scrolling to find an app.


Panasonic's marketplace offers a healthy selection of apps.

One feature I wish the Panasonic had is the capability to play 4K Netflix content, because the app in the AX800U UHD/4K TV I'm reviewing currently does not support 4K Netflix content. Moreover, if I can go off on a tangent for just a moment, my dream is a Blu-ray player that could tap into a UHD/4K stream and downscale it for 1080p playback. It's just a hunch, but I suspect those streams would truly rival Blu-ray discs in terms of picture quality, on 1080p displays.

One of the more significant hardware features offered by the DMP-BDT460 is dual HDMI outputs, which allows the player to work with AVRs, soundbars, HTiBs, and other audio systems that don't support 3D or UHD/4K pass-through. You simply run one HDMI cable directly to the TV and another to the audio system; you can also set the secondary HDMI output so it is audio only. This feature came in handy for me, since my receiver is not UHD/4K compatible. The player also offers an optical S/PDIF output.


Pictured here are the twin HDMI outputs on the DMP-BDT460, along with the LAN port and the optical S/PDIF output.

Normally, it is not necessary to have UHD/4K output on a Blu-ray player, even if you already own a UHD/4K TV, because most UHDTVs offer built-in upscaling. Moreover, the truth is that upscaling doesn't improve image quality; it can only preserve what's already there. However, the DMP-BDT460 offers a pretty cool UHD/4K capability—it can display JPEGs in full UHD/4K resolution. Most upscaling Blu-ray players downscale JPEG images to 1080p first, and then re-upscale them to UHD/4K. This Panasonic preserves all the original detail contained in modern digital photos. It even includes an SD card reader, making it easy to view photos shot with a digital camera in all their glory.

Cameras with 8-megapixel and higher resolution have been around for a while; many people have a significant collection of imagery at those resolutions, which they've never seen at full res. I have hundreds of thousands of such images, shot over the last decade and a half. This Panasonic makes it very easy to capitalize on photo collections by putting together slideshows, and the results look stunning. In fact, slideshows are one of the best uses I've seen for UHD/4K. With still photos, it makes sense to approach the screen and marvel at the micro details that you can see when 8 megapixels are visible at once. Even photos from high-end smartphones, such as the iPhone and Samsung Galaxy S4/S5, looked sharper when viewed in UHD versus HD. However, photos taken with modern large-sensor digital cameras really show off what UHD/4K resolution can look like—16-megapixel JPEGs from my Sony NEX-6 looked more resolute than any UHD/4K demo videos I've seen.

The UHD/4K JPEG playback capability also works with USB drives, cameras connected via USB, and files burned to disc. The whole process of loading and viewing a slideshow takes mere seconds, and the player is very responsive to commands.

The DMP-BDT460 also did a great job playing 1080p video via USB as well as from an SD card, with fast and easy navigation of files and responsive playback controls. I was less impressed with the speed of browsing DLNA media on my PC, but at least that function worked as expected, providing full access to all of my DLNA-accessible photo, video, and music collections.

Another feature that helps the Panasonic stand out is support for Miracast, which enables screen mirroring with Android tablets and smartphones. The feature even gets its own button on the remote control, and the quality of the mirrored image was very good with minimal latency. It's a handier feature than I expected it to be, especially when it comes to quickly showing off photos and even video clips from my phone.

Speaking of the remote control, Panasonic's is neither the best nor the worst I've seen, but it's definitely not a highlight. It is a bit short and stubby, and it lacks backlit buttons. The buttons themselves are rather small and tightly-packed; perhaps the greatest annoyance is how close the Netflix button is to the up button on the directional pad. I keep launching Netflix by accident, although I'm sure if I used the remote for long enough, my fingers would learn which button was which. Anyhow, the remote does the job, but it definitely suffers from being a bit too small.


There's a lot going on button-wise in this compact remote.

When it comes to actual Blu-ray playback, it's hard to find a player that messes things up, thanks to HDMI. As far as I can tell, this Panasonic is faithful to the source material. It displays resolution and contrast test patterns properly, and Blu-ray playback is smooth and glitch-free. If you want better picture quality, you probably have to buy yourself an Oppo BDP-103D with built-in Darbee video processing.

To me, the more important quality in the Blu-ray player is how resistant it is to read errors caused by scratches and fingerprints. To test that, I created a disc out of a copy of The Bourne Legacy, using my greasy thumbs and some sandpaper. It closely resembles discs I've received from Netflix in the past, but the first minute of each chapter will play on my Sony BDP–S5100 without a problem. To test the Panasonic, did the same thing, playing the first minute of each chapter. The DMP-BDT460 stumbled at the beginning of chapter 5; it was a brief stumble, just a second or so when the frame froze, and then the video kept playing as normal. I skipped back a few times and the issue recurred, so I attribute it to a read error. Aside from that glitch, the Panasonic handled the mangled disc just fine. Still, it's worth noting that the Sony did not stumble at all. I let the movie play for almost an hour, and aside from that one glitch, the DMP-BDT460 did not falter at all. I'd feel confident watching a rental disc on this Panasonic Blu-ray player.


This is my reference disc I created to test for testing scratch and fingerprint resistance.

With a retail price of $180, the DMP-BDT460 costs a bit more than your typical off-the-shelf Blu-ray player from a major electronics manufacturer, but it's packed with features and offers robust performance. The omission of an Amazon app is a bit mystifying, but the player more than makes up for that misstep with other capabilities, including Miracast, dual HDMI output, and UHD/4K JPEG playback. It looks slick, and it loads, plays, and deals with Blu-ray discs in an expedited fashion compared to players I've used in the past. If Blu-rays are your primary movie-watching medium, and you want a robust, full-featured player, then the DMP-BDT460 is definitely worth your consideration.


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post #2 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 09:45 AM
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Nice write-up, Mark.

Does Panasonic happen to mention if those are HDMI 2.0 outputs? Is the USB 2.0 or 3.0?

Those top-mounted buttons for play / pause / stop and drawer open/close are very rack-mount UNfriendly...
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post #3 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 09:52 AM
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Greetings,

I am a fan of Panasonic Blu-ray players and have owned several, one of which (the DMP BDT-310) remains in my equipment rack. I have always found them to be reliable and fast. Thanks for this informative and thorough review Mark. Always appreciated..


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post #4 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 10:25 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by TMcG View Post
Nice write-up, Mark.

Does Panasonic happen to mention if those are HDMI 2.0 outputs? Is the USB 2.0 or 3.0?

Those top-mounted buttons for play / pause / stop and drawer open/close are very rack-mount UNfriendly...
Good point about the chassis buttons and rack-mount!

It's plain-old USB 2.0, and the HDMI outputs are not listed as 2.0, which means they almost certainly are not—then again, the player doesn't have any capabilities that require it HDMI 2.0

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post #5 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 10:55 AM
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I am not a fan of Panasonic Blu-ray players, @ all; I found them unreliable. ...From personal experience, and I'm not the only one.
My experience with Panasonic will keep me away from that company for a very reasonable while.

________

Now, Mark, you said in your review that in order to have better picture quality you would need to buy an Oppo BDP-103D Blu-ray player with built-in Darbee video processing ($599 MSRP). Then the Oppo BDP-103 (without the built-in Darbee video processor) wouldn't do it ($399 MSRP - Refurb directly from Oppo, with full warranty)?

* The "D" (Darbee) in Oppo players; it's the "Real" Deal, the true "Accurate" picture representation with total integrity to the director's intended moving images resolution and colored canvas depiction? ...Or a personal choice (picture preference) from the viewer's (you) standpoint?


Thank you for your review, all your reviews; you are one of my favorite AVS members.

R §
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post #6 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 11:07 AM
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Will this Panasonic stream Netflix 3D via its Netflix ap?
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post #7 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 11:11 AM
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My older Panasonic DMP-BDT210 has an Amazon app, bizarre that this newer model eliminates it. Maybe there's some corporate bad blood between Panasonic and Amazon?

My only complaint with my player is that it's on the noisy side when it's spinning discs.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthSky View Post
I am not a fan of Panasonic Blu-ray players, @ all; I found them unreliable. ...From personal experience, and I'm not the only one.
My experience with Panasonic will keep me away from that company for a very reasonable while.

________

Now, Mark, you said in your review that in order to have better picture quality you would need to buy an Oppo BDP-103D Blu-ray player with built-in Darbee video processing ($599 MSRP). Then the Oppo BDP-103 (without the built-in Darbee video processor) wouldn't do it ($399 MSRP - Refurb directly from Oppo, with full warranty)?

* The "D" (Darbee) in Oppo players; it's the "Real" Deal, the true "Accurate" picture representation with total integrity to the director's intended moving images resolution and colored canvas depiction? ...Or a personal choice (picture preference) from the viewer's (you) standpoint?


Thank you for your review, all your reviews; you are one of my favorite AVS members.

R §
A director's vision does not really encompass video sharpening, especially with movies that are produced for theatrical presentation. Truth be told, same goes for color since rec. 709 is much narrower than film or DCI.

Dialing-in sharpening is a bit of an artform, it is technically a destructive process. Activating any sort of image processing is technically a personal choice.

Darbee only deals with sharpness, not color. Sharpening is the primary image quality parameter that you can improve upon by employing better-quality algorithms. I'd say sophisticated sharpening accounts for the vast majority of the so-called improvement people see in 1080p that's upscaled to 2160p.

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post #9 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 11:14 AM - Thread Starter
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Will this Panasonic stream Netflix 3D via its Netflix ap?
I'll check that out. If it does, I'll edit the review to include that info. I'd better check Vudu 3D, too. Thanks!

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post #10 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 11:15 AM
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Originally Posted by niccolo View Post
My older Panasonic DMP-BDT210 has an Amazon app, bizarre that this newer model eliminates it. Maybe there's some corporate bad blood between Panasonic and Amazon?

My only complaint with my player is that it's on the noisy side when it's spinning discs.
Actually strike that, my second complaint is that when watching Amazon streams, the Player seems to introduce micro-pauses between cuts in movies. One could easily miss it, but once attuned to it, it's pretty annoying. But since others have reported the same issue with other players, I'm not sure whether to blame Panasonic for this one.

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post #11 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 11:19 AM
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One feature I wish the Panasonic had is the capability to play 4K Netflix content, because the app in the AX800U UHD/4K TV I'm reviewing currently does not support 4K Netflix content. Moreover, if I can go off on a tangent for just a moment, my dream is a Blu-ray player that could tap into a UHD/4K stream and downscale it for 1080p playback. It's just a hunch, but I suspect those streams would truly rival Blu-ray discs in terms of picture quality, on 1080p displays.
My understanding is that they won't enable Netflix 4K streaming on any device that doesn't support HDCP 2.2. While Panasonic could make the player HDCP 2.2 compliant, they probably don't want to have to deal with the complaints of customers who purchase the blu-ray player, but still can't actually watch 4K streams because they connected it to a display (or a port on a display) that does not support HDCP 2.2.

As far as streaming 4K for the purpose of downscaling to 1080p, I don't think it would improve the picture quality as you suggest. While capturing content in a higher resolution and then scanning or resampling the content down to a lower resolution can produce a better result than capturing at the lower resolution to begin with, it requires a large increase in bandwidth at the time of capture to take advantage of this. As streaming stands now, 4K streams do provide more detail than 1080p streams. However, because H.265 does not give the full 50% reduction in bandwith vs. H.264 that it hopes to eventually achieve and because the bit rate of 4K streams is not even twice the bit rate used for a decent 1080p stream (15.6 Mbps vs. ~9 Mbps), you are also getting more compression artifacts in that 4K stream than you would in a good 1080p stream. This is why an upscaled 1080p Blu-Ray can oftentimes look better than a native 4K stream on a 4K display.

If you were to take that 4K stream and then simply throw away 3 out of every 4 pixels in order to display it on your 1080p HDTV, it would potentially look worse than if you had just streamed it in 1080p to begin with, due to the extra compression artifacts. It would take some very good down-scaling algorithms to be able to identify the additional compression artifacts in order to eliminate them and then take advantage of the additional resolution information in order to reproduce a cleaner 1080p image.

That aside, the Panasonic looks like a real contender. Just out of curiosity, have you ever compared the newer Sony BDP-6200 to your current 5100? I'm curious to know if the Panasonic would outperform it in terms of loading times and UI responsiveness. The dual HDMI outputs are a really nice feature, as is the ability to view 4K photos in their native resolution. I prefer the shape of the player to the odd stealth/pyramid look of the Sony's. You mentioned that it can play 8mp JPEGS from USB. Can it also play them from network storage or your PC via. DLNA? I noticed that it has a YouTube app. Does it support streaming of 4K videos from YouTube?

Thanks,
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post #12 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 11:25 AM
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Can it do HDX 1080p24? That's my gripe with my ROKU and PS3.....will only do HDX 1080p60
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post #13 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 11:27 AM
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Is there an app for IP control of this unit? I know that 2013 models they rendered useless when it comes to IP control unlike their x10 and x20 models.




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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthSky View Post
I am not a fan of Panasonic Blu-ray players, @ all; I found them unreliable. ...From personal experience, and I'm not the only one.
My experience with Panasonic will keep me away from that company for a very reasonable while.

________

Now, Mark, you said in your review that in order to have better picture quality you would need to buy an Oppo BDP-103D Blu-ray player with built-in Darbee video processing ($599 MSRP). Then the Oppo BDP-103 (without the built-in Darbee video processor) wouldn't do it ($399 MSRP - Refurb directly from Oppo, with full warranty)?

* The "D" (Darbee) in Oppo players; it's the "Real" Deal, the true "Accurate" picture representation with total integrity to the director's intended moving images resolution and colored canvas depiction? ...Or a personal choice (picture preference) from the viewer's (you) standpoint?


Thank you for your review, all your reviews; you are one of my favorite AVS members.

R §
The Oppo 103D also uses different video processing hardware than the 103, which most owners consider an improvement. So, even with the Darbee effect turned off, it has some benefits.

As far as reliability of Blu-Ray players go, generally speaking, Oppo, Sony, and Panasonic are all considered to be top tier. Denon, Marantz, and Pioneer players are also pretty reliable, but are typically overpriced for the features included. The brands that tend to get knocked for their (un)reliability are Samsung, LG, and most of the lesser known brands.
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post #15 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 12:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post
A director's vision does not really encompass video sharpening, especially with movies that are produced for theatrical presentation. Truth be told, same goes for color since rec. 709 is much narrower than film or DCI.

Dialing-in sharpening is a bit of an artform, it is technically a destructive process. Activating any sort of image processing is technically a personal choice.

Darbee only deals with sharpness, not color. Sharpening is the primary image quality parameter that you can improve upon by employing better-quality algorithms. I'd say sophisticated sharpening accounts for the vast majority of the so-called improvement people see in 1080p that's upscaled to 2160p.
Mark, thank you for your reply.

I am familiar with Darbee "sharpening" video processing.

Here's a question: Do you think that sharpening effects coloring up to a certain degree? ...Perhaps undistinguished in normal viewing time on certain screens, but with precise measurements in real life when viewing on the very best large widescreen displays... How precise the human eye is in relation to the best photographic lens of a camera?

I am not an expert on picture processing; I simply wonder how our perception can be affected when one picture parameter is slightly offset, and what it does to other picture parameters, like coloring in this instance, and no matter how super slight it is, and that the human eye cannot distinguish it on a regular screen (say a 60" class size one for example - full HD 1080p of course).

- I mentioned the "movie director" (his main cameraman too) as it is the general accepted standard when talking picture from motion picture films. And then he's working with them people @ their desk with their computers in "enhancing" picture parameters (sharpening, coloring, DNR, etc.).
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post #16 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 12:28 PM
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Originally Posted by HockeyoAJB View Post
The Oppo 103D also uses different video processing hardware than the 103, which most owners consider an improvement. So, even with the Darbee effect turned off, it has some benefits.

As far as reliability of Blu-Ray players go, generally speaking, Oppo, Sony, and Panasonic are all considered to be top tier. Denon, Marantz, and Pioneer players are also pretty reliable, but are typically overpriced for the features included. The brands that tend to get knocked for their (un)reliability are Samsung, LG, and most of the lesser known brands.
Yes, I am familiar with that (different video processor in the 103 and 103D). ...And the "slight picture improvement" perceived by several viewers in favor of the 103D. ...And the flaw in the 103 (the sharpening always on and that you cannot disable...). ...Or is it the softening?

- Reliability of BD players: Tough to be truly a reliable scientific assessment; we can mainly speak from personal experience and make an average of what each person has read all over and for each particular manufacturer's BD player model.
Me, personally, and from extensive readings @ all over audio/video forums of the world; Oppo and Sony fair the best.
...Samsung is better than Panasonic.
For BD players, Denon is not my contender, never was.

Marantz, Pioneer, LG, Sharp, etc., I just don't know and I am not inclined towards them either.

These are my personal opinion, and I respect any diverging opinion. ...I simply share it as it is right to share.

Last edited by NorthSky; 07-22-2014 at 12:32 PM.
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post #17 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 12:40 PM
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My Panny player sometimes has issues connecting to my network. I sometimes have to turn it off and back on. Not a huge deal. Other than that, it works fine.
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post #18 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 02:43 PM
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Originally Posted by curlyjive View Post
Can it do HDX 1080p24? That's my gripe with my ROKU and PS3.....will only do HDX 1080p60
Yes. It can do 1080p24 playback of both 2D & 3D movies. It can also upscale 2D 1080p24 content to 2160p24. It's 4K upscaling does not work with 3D content.
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post #19 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 03:13 PM
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Originally Posted by HockeyoAJB View Post
Yes. It can do 1080p24 playback of both 2D & 3D movies. It can also upscale 2D 1080p24 content to 2160p24. It's 4K upscaling does not work with 3D content.
We are talking about vudu hdx streaming right? I know it will play blu ray at 24p.
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post #20 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 03:41 PM
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Originally Posted by BLWTX View Post
Will this Panasonic stream Netflix 3D via its Netflix ap?
Netflix and VUDU will both tell you to contact the numerous manufactures to find if there product supports streaming there 3D.

Easy right?

How hard could it be to have a sticker that simply says VUDU or Netflix 3D or UHD certified.

Apparently it is very hard.
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post #21 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 03:50 PM
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I believe the Panasonic bdt-360 deserves its own review because despite my expectations for a great bluray player from Panasonic, the BDT-360 falls utterly short. I bought it and was so disappointed by it, I returned it the next day. Despite buggy performance, multiple resets, and terrible network connectivity, the worse part of all was its Bluray performance. It did not perform anywhere near as well as the PS3 that I was replacing.

I never thought bluray players could make BDs look bad, but the BDT-360 did (even in its default Auto/normal mode). 3D blurays were absolutely horrendous to look at. I spent an hour messing with the settings trying to get things right but it's playback was terrible. So, people who read the BDT-460 review and expect the BDT-360 to be comparable to it will be disappointed to know it does not.

After I did some research, I discovered Panasonic isn't using the same chip that previous bluray players were using in an effort to save money. My understanding is that the BDT-460 still incorporates this chip. Why, Panasonic, would you do this?

Last edited by richierich93; 07-22-2014 at 03:54 PM.
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post #22 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 04:01 PM
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Will this Panasonic stream Netflix 3D via its Netflix ap?
Yes it will. Although I tried the $120 Walmart version known as the DMP-BDT361. It's basically the same exact BD player except it does not have dual HDMI outs. Feature list seems to be exactly the same

Netflix's 3D category showed up no problem, BUT I did not see an option for "Super HD" which is their highest bitrate streaming HD option. My Samsung tv has this option but this bluray player does not

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post #23 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 04:07 PM
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Ahh - no SACD...

I have an earlier Panasonic (BDP-220 I think), and I'm happy with it. I would like faster loading times of course, and the look of this one is really nice. The big feature I am missing is SACD compatibility! I was going to reply and ask about it, but then I figured it would be easy to Google it myself...

http://shop.panasonic.com/docs/opera...BDT460-MUL.pdf

Alas, no SACD. Oh, well. I guess I'll save my $180 and keep saving for the Oppo after all!
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post #24 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 04:55 PM
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Very nice review. I am waiting until the affordable 4k laser PJs and the PR-SC5510 come around to get rid of my trusty PS3/Harmony-IR-adapter media hub.
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post #25 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 05:31 PM
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"Most upscaling Blu-ray players downscale JPEG images to 1080p first, and then re-upscale them to UHD/4K"

Do we know what recent BD players do downscale/upscale instead of native? How does Sony handle this?
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post #26 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 06:51 PM
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Originally Posted by NorthSky View Post
I am not a fan of Panasonic Blu-ray players, @ all; I found them unreliable. ...From personal experience, and I'm not the only one.
My experience with Panasonic will keep me away from that company for a very reasonable while.

________
I am in agreement with you

I have bought several over the years...the last one the BMT500

apps suite is not cutting edge

but the big issue is that the Panasonic seems to be very finicky on burned BD-R's

ones that I throw in the samsung or Sony player and they play fine

Warren

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post #27 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 08:40 PM
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I had to return this since it was missing some of the basic features when compared with Sony BDPS6200. First and foremost, there's no chapter support for mkv file format. Amazon app is missing, The UI is slow and buggy when compared to BDPS6200. And the most annoying part of the player was, showing up advertisement whenever the player is restarted or open the app drawer. There's no way to completely disable the ad.

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post #28 of 31 Old 07-22-2014, 09:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Photokid1970 View Post
I have an earlier Panasonic (BDP-220 I think), and I'm happy with it. I would like faster loading times of course, and the look of this one is really nice. The big feature I am missing is SACD compatibility! I was going to reply and ask about it, but then I figured it would be easy to Google it myself...

http://shop.panasonic.com/docs/opera...BDT460-MUL.pdf

Alas, no SACD. Oh, well. I guess I'll save my $180 and keep saving for the Oppo after all!
All (almost all) Sony Blu-ray players play SACDs. ...And they do well in that department.
Some models have two HDMI outputs. And, they have a dual-core video processor (real fast).
...And cost no more than that Panny player. ...And some are hack-able.
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post #29 of 31 Old Yesterday, 05:10 AM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by NorthSky View Post
All (almost all) Sony Blu-ray players play SACDs. ...And they do well in that department.
Some models have two HDMI outputs. And, they have a dual-core video processor (real fast).
...And cost no more than that Panny player. ...And some are hack-able.
Which Sony has dual HDMI out?

Find out more about Mark Henninger at www.imagicdigital.com

Last edited by imagic; Yesterday at 05:13 AM.
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post #30 of 31 Old Yesterday, 05:28 AM
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Which Sony has dual HDMI out?
The last one to have it was the S790, which is a couple of years old.
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