Official PS3 FAQ Master Thread - AVS Forum
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post #2 of 4480 Old 08-21-2008, 07:32 AM
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Update:  March 1, 2014

 

 

 

Video and Display Settings - Music Settngs - Remote Controls -

 

The current firmware version is 4.55 (click on the Firmware link above for the instructions to download and install the latest firmware).

This is the new AVS Playstation 3 (PS3) FAQ Thread for using the Sony PS3 as a Blu-ray Disc (BD) and DVD player. The old AVS PS3 FAQ thread is HERE and the on-going PS3 discussion thread is HERE. Also HERE is the new discssion thread intended to just cover the new "PS3 Slim" model. This PS3 FAQ thread applies to all models of the PS3 including the original "full sized" models as well as the new smaller "PS3 Slim" model. The old AVS PS3 FAQ thread was created by AVS forum member Steve Schauer with input from a number of other AVS members. Much of the material in this post has been taken from this earlier FAQ thread with appropriate updates and additions to account for the various new functions and upgrades that have been made to the PS3, via firmware updates, that have been released by Sony since the original FAQ summary, in Post #1 of that tread, was last updated in January 2008. Much of credit for the information included in this new FAQ thread goes to Steve and the contributors to the earlier PS3 FAQ thread. Thanks go the major contributions to the summary information in that earlier PS3 FAQ thread that included forum members: chris0, geko29, CasualViewer, bplewis24, joeblow, Rich Davenport, 30XS955 User, BigScreen, and splinters. Also thanks to AVS forum member DarkAdept for the inputs he provided for this New PS3 FAQ thread.

The goal of this New AVS PS3 FAQ thread is to provide an overview of the video and audio capabilities (i.e. non-gaming) of the PS3 and to also provide “How to” information on setting up the PS3 for various somewhat generic home theater configurations. The PS3 is a very complex device with dozens of individual setup options. Likewise, there are many different possible configurations of home theater systems (e.g., HDTV displays, audio/video receivers and speakers) and it is impossible to address every possible alternative configuration. However, the goal is to describe within this Post the recommended PS3 setup for several of the most common home theater configurations and then rely on subsequent discussion among AVS members to address specific/unique configurations not covered by the more generic configurations described below.

 

 

 

 

THE BASICS

 

What You Need to Know Before You Start

 

 

  • The PS3 Owner's Manual is your best friend for installing and setting up your new PS3. The manual is available online HERE

 

  • The PS3 console can be placed on a shelf either in a vertical or a horizontal position. The PS3 generates a lot of heat and has an internal cooling fan. You must provide adequate ventilation around the PS3. Warning - Do not place the PS3 in a closed cabinet as it will overheat. The lastest versions of the PS3 do produce less heat then earlier versions, but still more than a typical stand-alone Blu-ray Disc player.
  • Sony has been frequently releasing firmware updates for the PS3. Unlike standalone BD players, the PS3 uses a very capable general-purpose processor (i.e., Cell processor) and many of the audio and video capabilities are performed in software running on the unit’s processor, rather than in dedicated hardware as used in standalone BD players. This has allowed Sony to easily add many new capabilities to the PS3 via firmware updates. Newly purchased PS3’s will not usually have the latest firmware and you should be prepared to download and install the latest firmware update once you have your PS3 installed and connected to your system. More information is provided below on how to do this.
  • The PS3 is ‘internet enabled’ with built-in Ethernet and WiFi* support if you have high speed internet access (e.g., cable modem, DSL) at your location then you should set up your PS3 to enable its networking capability. To do this you will either need to have a WiFi (wireless) router within your home or have a wired Ethernet connection available to your PS3. If connecting via WiFi you will need to know your wireless router's SSID, encryption method and encryption key (if your wireless network has security enabled). The PS3 setup instructions for WiFi are HERE. Having either a wired or wireless internet connection available to your PS3 provides the most convenient method for updating the firmware in your PS3. Internet connectivity will also give you access to many game and video software downloads and is necessary if you want to use any of the web-enabled interactive features (referred to as “BD-live”) that are offered on some recent BD titles.

*

Note that the now discontinued 20GB PS3 model does not include a WiFi capability.
  • The PS3 is supplied with a game controller that can also be used to control the playback of BDs, DVDs and CDs. However many PS3 owners (especially non-gamers) using a PS3 for a home theater application prefer to use a more conventional remote control for playing discs. Sony sells a BD remote for $25 retail that, like the game controller, uses Bluetooth (i.e, radio frequency) for the wireless connection to the PS3 console. There are infrared (IR) remote control solutions for disc playback being offered by third party manufacturers, but not Sony. If you already have a universal programmable IR remote control that you use for controlling your other home theater devices and desire to also use it to control your PS3, then it can likely be used in combination with one of the available IR remote solutions now available. More information is provided later in this post.
  • You will need to purchase the appropriate cables to connect your new PS3 to your home theater system. This may be when connecting the PS3 directly to a HDTV or when connecting the PS3 to an Audio/Video Receiver (AVR) then connecting the AVR to your HDTV. See the information below on connecting the PS3. Many retailers will try to sell you very expensive HDMI cables for connecting the PS3 to your HDTV, but these are generally a waste of money. Quality, low cost HDMI cables are readily available and will, for most users, provide identical results to the high priced cables. On-line dealers, such as forum sponsor monoprice.com, have quality HDMI and other types of video and audio cables at very attractive prices.

 

 

 

How do I turn the PS3 on and off?

Probably the most basic of all questions. There is a master power switch on the back of the console. This is normally kept in the on position and this will keep the PS3 in a standby mode with a red LED (light) displayed on the front panel. Next to that red light on the front panel is a touch sensitive on/off button. To power on the PS3 console you place your finger on this button and the adjacent LED will turn from red to green. To turn the console off hold your finger on the power button for about 3 seconds, until the adjacent LED start flashing, and the PS3 will power down. Another method to turn off the PS3 is from the XMB under "Users" you can select the command to "Turn System Off." Using a remote, you can power on the PS3 console by pressing the ‘P’ button, on either the game controller or the Sony BD remote. Finally, you can power on the PS3 console by inserting a Blu-ray Disc (BD), a DVD or a CD into the loading slot on the front panel of the PS3 console. In this case the PS3 will power on and begin playing the disc.

What is the difference between the various now discontinued PS3 "Fat" models and the current PS3 "Slim" models?

As far as playing Blu-ray Disc (BDs), DVDs or CDs and for playing PS3 games, all PS3 models (past and current) perform the same functions with only one additional capability (i.e., HD audio bitstreaming) that is only available with the newer PS3 'Slim' series (see below). All PS3 models sold up until August 2009 were of the original PS3 "Fat" design. In August 2009 Sony introduced an updated version of the PS3 that is housed in a low profile slimmer case, which is referred to as the PS3 'Slim' design.

PS3 'Fat' Overview:

 

 

Up until August 2008 the features of the different models were clear when one referred to the unit's hard disk drive capacity. However, new models appearing and announced in August 2008 make things more difficult. Here is a brief run down on the evolution of the PS3 'Fat' series:

  • The PS3 was introduced with a 20GB and a 60GB model in November 2006 in the USA. Both of these models had dedicated hardware support for providing backward compatibility for playing PS2 games and the 60GB model also had a flash card reader (e.g. for SD, memory stick, etc). However the 60GB model subsequently released in Europe in early 2007 went the way of the later models and provided PS2 compatibility through a combination of software emulation and hardware.
  • In early 2007 Sony discontinued the 20GB model
  • In mid-2007 Sony added a 80GB model that was bundled with the PS3 game Motorstorm and they discontinued the 60GB model. The 80GB model had a combination of software emulation and hardware for playing PS2 games and otherwise included the same basic feature set of the 60GB model.
  • Later in 2007 Sony added a 40GB model that had only two USB ports (instead of the 4 on earlier models), lacked the flash card reader of the 60GB and 80GB models and most significant for some, did not have backward compatibility for playing PS2 games.
  • In the spring of 2008 Sony stopped shipments of the original 80GB model/software bundle then in mid-2008 briefly reintroduced a 80GB bundle that included enhanced game controllers as well as being packaged with a newer game release (i.e., Metal Gear Solid 4). This 80GB model was essentially the same as the earlier 80GB model and retained support for PS2 games.
  • In August Sony introduced a new 80GB model (model number PS398013) that is basically the same console as the earlier 40GB model (i.e, two USB ports, no PS2 game support, etc.), but with a 80GB hard disk drive at the same $399 retail price as the 40GB model it replaced. The older 80GB model/game bundle was subsequently discontinued. So if you are purchasing a 80GB model you must look for the specific features or the specific model number, not just the hard disk drive capacity to determine which version you are getting.
  • Then in November 2008 Sony introduced a new 160GB model (model number PS398038) that is bundled with the game "Uncharted: Drake's Fortune" for a list price of $499. Like the current 80GB model, the 160GB models has only 2 USB ports and lacks support for PS2 games.


Performance for playing Blu-ray Discs, DVDs and PS3 games is identical with all PS3 'Fat' models. However, the later PS3 'Fat' models will not play PS2 games. Also the later 'Fat' models do not support SACD (Super Audio CD) playback while the early models did. Starting with the first 40GB model changes were made to the hardware that resulted in lower power consumption and less heat being produced than the earlier models. As a result, these later PS3 'Fat' models in general produce less fan noise. If you must have compatibility for playing PS2 games on your PS3, then your only alternative is find one of the now discontinued early PS3 'Fat' models that had this capability.

 

PS3 'Slim' Overview:

 

Sony introduced the "PS3 Slim" (in August 2009) at a list price of $299. The 'Slim' series is the first update to the basic PS3 design and functionality since the PS3 was first introduced in late 2006. The first PS3 using the new compact (i.e., 'Slim') case included a 120 GB hard drive. More recent versions of the PS3 'Slim' have been introduced with 160 GB and 320 GB hard drives. The only functional difference offered by the new PS3 Slim models, as compared to the previous 'Fat' models, is the new 'Slim' models have upgraded the HDMI hardware and associated firmware such that the lossless audio formats (Dolby TrueHD and DTS HD-MA) can now be bitstreamed via the HDMI output. The PS3 'Slim' series, like the later versions of the PS3 'Fat' series, do only offer support for playback of SACDs nor compatibility with PS2 games.

 

 

How do I setup my new PS3 for use with my HDTV display and my audio system?

The PS3 displays a graphical user interface using a XrossMediaBar with drop down menus. The "Settings" drop down from the XMB is used to configure the audio and video capabilities of the PS3.

 

 


I have a widescreen TV but I still see black bars on some movies.

This one is easy to understand. Really. Movies are rectangular, and they come in a lot of different shaped rectangles (aspect ratios). If the movie rectangle isn't the same proportions as your TV's rectangle, it won't fill the screen unless you distort it by stretching it vertically or horizontally. This article by Joshua Zyber explains it pretty well:

http://www.highdefdigest.com/news/show/764

How do I select the Audio and Video options while playing a movie on BD or DVD

The main (top level) menu on some discs provide an audio options menu item that you must enter to select the audio track you want to play, if other than the default is desired. Once the movie is playing you can press the Triangle button the BD remote or game controller and this will bring up an on-screen menu with icons and pop-up text descriptions for a number of audio and video playback options.

Does the PS3 have a 'Resume Play' function for playback of DVDs and BDs?

You must use the 'Stop' function to end playback of a disc, not just eject the disc during playback, in order for the resume play to work. Resume works with all DVD disc. However, for Blu-ray discs the resume feature works on all Profile 1.0 titles but appears to not work on Profile 1.1 and Profile 2.0 titles with bookmarking facilities or BD-Java content (see below).

How do I use the Bookmark feature with BDs?

The bookmark feature only works on BD titles that include BD-Java menus and that have also enabled bookmarks. The following example of how to use bookmarks assumes you are using a Sony Bluetooth BD remote control. Note that if you are using the Sony PS3 game controller or a non-Sony BD remote that lacks the number keys you can enter numbers by pressing the Triangle button on the controller/remote then selecting the number from the menu. I played the Independence Day BD which has BD-Java with bookmarks enabled for the following description.

Step 1 - To create a bookmark

While the movie is playing press the digit 1 key on the remote (and a brief message is displayed on the screen saying "Setting Marker 1"). To set another bookmark press the number 1 key again and you will get an on-screen message "Setting Marker 2", etc.

Step 2 - To go to a saved bookmark

  • When disc playback first starts up you will get a message asking "Do you wish to load the previously saved settings for this disc? These include language and audio settings was well as bookmarks." and you must enter YES to use the previously saved bookmarks. If you select NO it will clear all previously saved bookmarks.
  • Once you start playing the movie press the square button on the remote (labeled "View" on the Sony BD remote) or alternatively use the button labeled "Pop Up/Menu" and the disc menu will pop up. From this menu select "Special Features" then from the drop down menu select "Bookmarks". This will bring up a graphic at the bottom of the screen showing the saved bookmarks. Use the left-right arrow keys to select the bookmark number you want then press enter to go to that bookmark.

 

How do I check my firmware version?

On the PS3 XMB, choose Settings, System Settings, System Information. The current version as of this update is 3.30.

How do I update my firmware?

The simplest way is to connect your PS3 to the internet. Then, from the XMB, choose Settings, System Settings, Update via Internet.

If you don't have a network connection, you'll need to download the update and copy it to a USB memory stick or a memory card if your PS3 model has a memory card reader. More details are provided below how to update your PS3's firmware.

What's the best way to connect my PS3 to an Audio/Video Receiver (AVR) and an AVR to a HDTV display?

If your AVR has HDMI inputs and outputs, connect your PS3 to your AVR with an HDMI cable, and connect your AVR to your display with another HDMI cable.

If you HDTV display doesn't have a HDMI input, but has a DVI input that supports HDCP (copy protection) then you can use a HDMI-to-DVI cable to connect a HDMI output (e.g., from an AVR) to the DVI input on the HDTV display. If you also want the audio to be provided into the HDTV then you will need to run separate audio cable, since DVI only carries video.

If your AVR doesn't have a HDMI input and it has optical audio inputs while your HDTV display has a HDMI input, connect your PS3 to your AVR with an optical digital audio (i.e., Toslink) cable, and connect your PS3 to your HDTV display with an HDMI cable.

 

Note that some BD's only English language audio track is encoded using DTS HD-Master Audio (especially true for BDs released by Fox Studios). In order to hear this surround audio track your AVR must support DTS audio decoding when connected to the PS3 via an optical cable. If your AVR does not support DTS decoding (i.e., your AVR only supports Dolby Digital and PCM from the optical input) then you must configure the PS3's sound settings so that DTS is not enabled (not checked). This configuration will result in the PS3 decoding the DTS track on the BD and providing an 2-channel stereo format output via the PS3's optical connection. You may want to set your AVR to use Dolby Pro-Logic mode to recover some surround sound information from the 2-channel input.

If your HDTV display's only HD input is component video (it doesn't have a HDMI or DVI w/HDCP input), you'll need to purchase a PS3 component AV cable to get the component video output from the PS3 (limited to 1080i maximum output resolution). The component video cable is sold by Sony, Monster and others and is for use specifically with the PS3 (and PS2). If your AVR has HD capable component video inputs and an output you can connect both the audio and component video from the PS3 into the AVR then the component video out of the AVR to the HDTV display's component video input. If the AVR doesn't have component video inputs/output then you can connect the component video out of the PS3 directly to the display and run a separate audio connection (e.g., optical digital audio cable) from the PS3 the the AVR.

If your display doesn't have an HD input using component video or HDMI or DVI w/HDCP, I'm sorry for you since you won’t be able to get HD video.

See the Example Configurations for Connecting Your PS3 below for more information on typical PS3 connection and setup configurations.

Can the PS3 output video over multilple outputs (i.e., HDMI, Component or S-Video/Composite) at the same time

No, you can select only one video output type to be active at any one time (see video setup info below)

Can the PS3 output audio over multiple outputs (i.e., HDMI, Optical and Analog) at the same time?

Prior to version 3.00 firmware for the PS3, you could select only one audio output type to be active at any one time (see audio setup info below). However, starting with version 3.00 of the firmware a new menu selection has been added under the "Sound Settings" for "Audio Multi-Output". By setting "Audio Multi-Output" to "ON", multiple audio outputs (e.g., HDMI and optical) will be active at the same time.

Can the PS3 output video over component while simultaneously outputting audio over an HDMI connection?

Yes, and other combinations, like video over HDMI and audio over optical, are supported.

If if decide to sell my old PS3 and buy an new one are there any special things that I need to do

If you have a Playstation Network account set up with your original PS3 then it will need to be deactivated using your original PS3 before you sell it. By doing this you can activite the new PS3 to your existing Playstation Network account. Only one PS3 can be active (i.e., registered) on your Playstation Network account at any one time and as a result you must use your old PS3 system to remove itself from your account before using your new PS3 system to add itself to the account.

To deactivate your old PS3 from your Playstation Network account:

  • From the XMB go the "Playstation Network" drop down menu and select "Account Management"
  • Select "System Activation"
  • Select "PS3 System"
  • Select "Deactivate System"

 

Where can I get a good deal on the PS3?

Generally the PS3 sells for full list price (there is very little markup between the wholesale and retail price of the PS3 console). Occasionally there are some bonuses, such as adding on a free Sony remote for free BD movies. If you apply for a SonyStyle credit card here you can get a $100 credit on a PS3 purchase directly from Sony.

Should I buy the PS3 or the xxxxx?

Sorry, you're going to have to make up your own mind on that one. You might want to take a look at the Help a guy choose a Blu-ray player thread for some opinions.

How do I stream content to the PS3?

 

 

Windows PC

Apple MAC

TVersity

Linux (MediaTomb server software)

 

How do I configure the WiFi?

If your WiFi is unprotected, just go to: Settings >>> Network Settings >>> Internet Connection and choose Easy. If it's protected, choose Custom and you'll be prompted for the SSID, the encryption method and the security (i.e., encryption) key, which you'll need to get from your wireless router's configuration page if you don't already know it. The PS3 setup instructions for WiFi are HERE. If you have network problems with the PS3 or the other devices on your wireless network after adding the PS3, it may be necessary to assign a static IP address to avoid conflicts between the PS3 and other devices (e.g., a PC) on your wireless network. Information is HERE for assigning a static IP address to your PS3.

Note that the now discontinued 20GB version of the PS3 does not include a WiFi capability.

What is Folding@Home?

Folding@Home is a distributed computing project for scientific inquiry into protein folding as related to disease. You can donate time on your PS3, as a member of the avsforum team, no less. You can set a timer to shut off the PS3 after running for a specified period or when the next work unit (WU) is done. You'll need an internet connection to download WU's and folding software updates.

See folding@home web site.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From the XMB Settings menu there are two drop down menus that you will need to check.

 

  • First there is the "Video Settings" menu ("Video Settings" was called "BD/DVD Settings" with PS3 firmware prior to version 2.50 and includes items related to audio as well as video) which includes a sub-menu for setting the audio output format (with sub-menus for each HDMI and Optical outputs).

 

Also from the XMB Settings menu there is a drop down menu for "Sound Settings" and it is here that you select to have the audio output via either HDMI or Optical (one or the other, not both, can be selected for PS3 firmware versions prior to 3.00) with sub-menus under each for selecting the specific audio formats to be supported for that type of output. Starting with PS3 firmware version 3.00 multiple audio outputs can be active simultaneously. For this new feature, a new menu item has been added under the "Sound Settings" menu for "Audio Multi-Output". With this option set to "ON" the PS3 audio will be simutaneously output on multiple outputs (e.g., HDMI and optical).[/list]
In most cases you should set your PS3 to output Bitstream if you are using an optical digital connection (i.e., Toslink) from the PS3 to your Audio/Video Receiver (AVR), and you should set it to LPCM if you using a HDMI connection to an AVR (see below if you have the newer "PS3 Slim" model). These are the default settings.

Unless you have the newer "PS3 Slim" model, the PS3 will not bitstream advanced audio formats to your AVR (i.e., it can only bitstream basic Dolby Digital and DTS surround audio formats). All models of the PS3 can decode all of the Blu-ray Disc standard and optional audio formats and convert them to multichannel LPCM and pass that to your AVR via HDMI. Note however that the optical audio output from the PS3 (or any other Blu-ray Disc player), can never support the new high resolution (i.e., lossless) surround sound audio formats. Thus, to get the full advantage from the superior performance from the high resolution audio formats offered on BD, as compared to DVD, you must connect your PS3 to an AVR that has HDMI inputs. If you are using one of the orginal models of the PS3 (i.e., not the PS3 Slim) then the AVR must accept multichannel LPCM via a HDMI input (most AVRs that have HDMI inputs can do this except for a very few low-end models). If you are using the newer PS3 Slim model then it can be configured to either output the lossless audio in bitstream mode or to perform the decoding and output the lossless audio in LPCM mode via the HDMI output on the PS3. In order to use the bitstream mode on the PS3 Slim your AVR will need to both have an available HDMI input and be able to decode the lossless audio formats, including Dolby TrueHD and DTS HD-Master Audio.

The PS3 console has three types of audio outputs. The advanced high resolution Dolby, DTS and multi-channel PCM surround audio formats are only fully supported when using the HDMI output. However, if you are willing to live with just a 2-channel output in PCM (rather than the full surround sound formats) the improved fidelity offered by the advanced high resolution audio formats can be provided via the optical digital audio and even the analog audio outputs. Also Standard Dolby and DTS surround formats (as used on DVDs) can be output via the optical (Toslink) digital audio connection in bitstream format. The following table shows what audio format is output for each type of connection for the different audio formats that may be found on BDs, DVD, and SACD (Super Audio CDs).

 

 

 

 

Notes:

(1) lossless audio output is provided in multichannel Linear PCM (LPCM) format via HDMI for all channels recorded on Blu-ray Disc

(2) lossless audio is provided in only 2-channel PCM via optical (Toslink) output

(3) the standard Dolby Digital 5.1 audio track, if present on the disc, will be used for the bitstream output (this is typically the case for most BD titles)

(4) there may be certain allowed, but rarely used, 6.1 & 7.1 channel DTS HD-MA and HD-HR formats that the PS3 will decode and output in 5.1 format

(5) the current PS3 models do not support SACD playback (for more information see below)

(6) the output will be either DTS 5.1 or DTS ES 6.1. It will depend on the format of the the Core DTS audio track that is recorded on the disc.

(7) the newer “PS3 Slim” model can be configured to bitstream output, via HDMI, all of the allowed audio Formats found on Blu-ray Discs as shown the the left column of the above table (SACD disc formats shown in the table are not applicable)

 

 

For those still a bit confused by all the audio stuff here are two links that should help (Originally Posted by chris0).

This one explains the difference between decoding in the player (sending it PCM) or in the receiver (HBR bitstreaming, which the PS3 can't do for the advanced high resolution audio formats.)
http://www.highdefdigest.com/news/show/853
The relevant part is about halfway down under "New HD Lossless Audio Formats."

This one explains all the different codecs. It's a long read but a good one.
http://www.highdefdigest.com/news/show/1064


Does the PS3 play CD's?

Yes, and it can upconvert them to up to a 176.4 KHz sampling rate with selectable digital filters.

Does the PS3 play SACD's?

No current model of the PS3 supports SACD. However, early versions of the PS3 that were released from late 2006 through mid-2007 (i.e., prior to the first 40 GB Model) did support SACD. If you need SACD support be certain to check specifications for the specific model you are considering. You need HDMI to get the best sound and multi-channel play. The optical and analog outputs are functional but they are limited to 2 channel stereo sound, and only at a reduced fidelity 44.1 KHz sampling rate (i.e., standard CD rate) over the optical digital audio output.

See this PS3 SACD FAQ

Does the PS3 have analog outs?

There is a basic stereo analog out from the AV Connector. The PS3 does not use very high quality Digital-to-Analog (D-to-A) converters to drive the stereo analog output, thus the resulting sound quality, even for stereo sources, will generally not be as good as compared to using a digital connection to a quality AVR (which will typically have better quality D-to-A converters).

Why doesn't the Dolby TrueHD or DTS HD-Master Audio light on my AV Receiver (AVR) come on when I'm playing BDs with these lossless audio formats?

Because the original generation of PS3s use hardware that cannot bitstream the lossless Dolby and DTS audio formats via the HDMI output, the only option available for getting lossless multichannel audio out of these PS3 consoles is allowing the PS3 to do the decoding itself and then output, via HDMI, the decoded multichannel audio using Linear Pulse Code Modulation (LPCM). The AVR may have an indicator showing that the input is PCM, LPCM, MLPCM, or something similar. The AVR would only activate the Dolby TrueHD or DTS HD-MA light if it were doing the decoding. It would only be doing this if the source device were outputting these advanced audio formats as a bitstream and the original PS3 is not capable of doing this. The end result in sound quality is in most cases essentially the same (depending on the specific capabilities of the AVR) whether the decoding is being done by the PS3 vs. having the AVR do the decoding.

The new "PS3 Slim" design uses a later generation of HDMI hardware that is capable of bitstream output via HDMI of all of the Blu-ray Disc audio formats, including the lossless Dolby TrueHD and DTS HD-MA formats. Thus, with this new generation of PS3 hardware consumers that connect their PS3 Slim to a modern AVR via HDMI will have the choice of configuring the PS3 to internally decode the audio and the output this decoded audio in LPCM format (via the HDMI output) or having the PS3 bitstream the undecoded audio on to their AVR and allowing rhe AVR to do the decoding. In this latter case the AVR should indicate the specific audio format being output from the disc (i.e., including Dolby TrueHD or DTS HD-MA when those are available). Note that some Blu-ray Disc titles that do include one or more lossless audio tracks may only play the lossless track (instead of standard Dolby Digital or DTS) once the user has selected the lossless fromat from the disc's audio setup menu, while other Blu-ray titles may automatically default to the lossless audio track. This behavior is normal and is under the control of each movie studio when they create (author) their Blu-ray Discs.

How can I determine what audio (and video) format the PS3 is currently decoding and outputting when playing a Blu-ray Disc?

While playing a disc press the button on the game controller or remote with the triangle icon. This will bring up a 'control panel'. Use the cursor (or arrow) keys to highlight and select the i+ icon and this will display the current audio and video codecs being used and the associated bit rates.

Why is it when I play Blu-ray Discs on my PS3 that uses one of the lossess audio formats (e.g., Dolby TrueHD or DTS HD-MA), and with the PS3 doing the decoding and outputting via LCPM over HDMI, it doesn't sound a good as when using a standalone BD player and using bitstream output to my Audio/Video Receiver (AVR) with the AVR doing the decoding?

Assuming have correctly set up the PS3 to decode these advanced lossless formats and it is outputting the decoded lossless audio in LPCM format over the HDMI output to your AVR then the most likely reasons are:

 

 

  • The audio level being output from your AVR for the PS3's LPCM input is typically lower than what the AVR is outputting after decoding the bitstream received from the standalone BD player. Even slightly louder audio will sound better to most listners. You can increase the audio level from the PS3 when playing BDs by pressing the key on on the PS3 controller, or remote, with the triangle icon and from the 'control panel' that is displayed selecting the icon that looks like a speaker. Try increasing the volume level by just one or two increments and see if this helps. However, increasing the audio volume too much using this PS3 control can result in distortion in the loudest passages so don't increase the volume level more than necessary. Alternaively you can just increase the volume level on the AVR a little to produce a level equal to what you have heard when using a standalone player.
  • Your AVR may produce a difference in the audio quality due to how it is processing incoming LPCM vs. internally decoded audio. The better AVRs will buffer and re-clock the incoming LPCM (to correct any timing errors in the bit spacing) while many lesser quality AVRs will not. Also some AVRs provides for bass management only for audio decoded by the AVR. This is a limitation of the AVR not the PS3.

 

 

 

 

Under Settings >>> Display Settings >>> Video Output Settings you must select the type of video output you are using to connect your PS3 to your display. You can select only one the PS3's video outputs to be active. The video outputs available are are HDMI, Component Video, and S-Video/Composite Video. Only HDMI and Component Video support high definition video. HDMI will support resolutions up to 1080p while Component Video will support resolutions up to 1080i for Blu-ray Disc playback. Also note that use of component video requires a Playstation specific cable that is an optional accessory (available from Sony and Monster Cable).

Under Settings >>> Video Settings >>> BD/DVD Video Output Format (HDMI), what are RGB, Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr and Auto for?

In most cases the correct setting is 'Auto'. In Auto mode the display will indicate it capabilities in the initial HDMI data exchange and the PS3 will select the correct colorspace.

 

 

RGB: This is the colorspace typically used for computer generated graphics (e.g., as used by PCs and PC monitors). This is the colorspace also used in the PS3’s XMB interface and for video games, because they are encoded in sRGB. Selecting RGB will force this output mode for all video (including BD/DVD playback) output via HDMI from the PS3.

Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr: Another colorspace typically used for video recordings (e.g., BDs and DVDs) and video displays. If your HD display supports it, this is the desired colorspace when watching DVD or Blu-rays Discs. It is also recommended for playing home HD video recorded in AVCHD format, as used with many consumer HD camcorders. Selecting Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr will force this mode for all BD/DVD video output from the PS3.

Auto: Just like it sounds, it automatically selects between RGB or Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr colorspaces depending on the capabilities of the connected video display. Selecting “Auto” will normally provide the correct selection of RGB vs. Y Pb/Cb Pr//Cr when most HDMI equipped HDTV displays are attached to the PS3.

Note that the XMB and Games are always output in RGB format while BD/DVD playback is user selectable for output in RGB or Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr format.

I notice weird things happening with colors when selecting Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr or Auto. What should I do?

Try forcing the PS3 to output the video in RGB format (rather than Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr) to see if this eliminates the problems. Your display may not accept, or may have trouble with Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr format input.

So then under Settings >>> Display Settings, should I have RGB set to “Full” or “Limited”?

 

 

If your HDTV is calibrated (i.e., adjusted) for use as a video display (rather an a computer display) then “limited” is the correct setting. Most TVs can experience “black crush” when “Full” is selected because the colorspace is being re-mapped beyond what the TV is expecting. Start with it set at “Limited” and calibrate your TV accordingly (see the section below on Display Calibration).

See this discussion for a more detailed discussion (for and against)

What about Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr Super-White? “On” or “Off”?

Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr Super-white is used to pass Blacker-than-Black (BTB) and Peak Whiter-than-White (WTW) levels during video playback. Setting this to “On” should benefit your display as long as your TV accepts Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr input over HDMI. Again, try using a test pattern DVD/BD to calibrate your display after this is turned on (see the section below on Display Calibration). Note that some HDTVs will accept and display BTB and WTW while other HDTV’s will not display these ‘out of bounds’ video levels. Commercial BD discs (except test discs) should not be using BTB and WTW video levels and an ideally calibrated HDTV should correctly display all intended video information even it does not support BTB and WTW levels. However, support for BTB and WTW can be useful when using BD test discs for calibrating a HDTV display.

Not all displays are alike, so use common sense. If you notice a decrease in picture quality after changing any of the above settings either try recalibrating the TV or revert back to the previous setting.

DISPLAY CALIBRATION: Once you have set up your PS3 for a video output format that is optimum for your HDTV display, you should then set the reference Black and reference White levels for your display using the grey scale test pattern from on a HD test disc. The reference Black and reference White levels are adjusted using your HDTV display's brightness and contrast controls respectively. If you have a PC with a DVD burner then you can download the freeware AVS HD Calibration Disc as an ISO file then burn this to a DVD. The AVS HD Calibration Disc (ISO file that can be burned on a DVD+R or DVD-R) is described and can be downloaded HERE (download the AVCHD version). Once downloaded you can use a commercial program such as Nero or a freeware program such as IMGBURN, to create a playable disc by burning this ISO image file onto a blank DVD. As an alternative to using the AVS HD Calibration Disc you can use a commercial display calibration disc such as Digital Video Essentials or Avia.

How does the video compare to standalone BD players?

For BD playback most users think the PS3 is in the top tier of of BD players.

Does the PS3 support 1080p/24 playback for Blu-ray and DVD?

Playback at 1080p/24 is supported for Blu-ray but has not yet been added for playback of DVDs. 1080p output requires an HDMI connection for video. Most HDTV displays with a native resolution of 1080p (sometimes called "Full HD") will accept a 1080p/60 (i.e., 60 Hz) input. Some newer HDTV displays will also accept an input of 1080p/24 which is the native rate of most movies recorded on BDs. See THIS THREAD for a discussion on HDTVs that can most benefit from 1080p/24.

The relevant setting for configuring the PS3 to output video in the 1080p/24 format is accessed from the XMB:

XMB >>> Settings >>> Video Settings >>> BD 1080p 24 Hz Output (HDMI)

Note: "Video Settings" was called "BD/DVD Settings" with PS3 firmware prior to version 2.50

 

The default setting of "Automatic" will enable 1080p/24 for any display that correctly communicates that it is 1080p/24 capable. If you KNOW your HDTV display supports 1080p/24 and you're certain the PS3 isn't automatically enabling 1080p/24 during Blu-ray playback, changing this setting to "On" will force 1080p/24 playback. Changing the setting to "Off" will not allow 1080p/24 playback regardless of the display's capabilities.

How good is the video for playing DVDs (i.e., upconverting)?

The DVD upconversion capabilities of the PS3 are quite good and have improved with later PS3 firmware updates. Although the PS3 results are better than provided by many mass-market consumer upscaling DVD players, the results are still not quite to the level provided by the very best upscaling provided by the best video processor hardware (such as the Reon processor used in some high end standalone players, AVRs and outboard processors. PS3, Upconversion and Blu-ray

DVD upscaling features can be set starting from the XMB:

 

XMB >>> Settings >>> Video Settings* >>> Upscale

* "Video Settings" was called "BD/DVD Settings" with PS3 firmware prior to version 2.50

Setting this to "Off" will output DVD content at 480p, while the other three options will upscale the content to the highest output resolution available. "Normal" is usually the preferred setting, as it will preserve the aspect ratio of 4:3 content. "Full Screen" will stretch 4:3 content horizontally. "Double Scale" requires 1080i or 1080p output and will upscale to 1440x960 (exactly double DVD's native 720x480 resolution.)

Note that upscaling copy-protected commercial DVDs requires an HDMI connection. With most commercial DVDs component video output from the PS3 is limited to 480p.

Currently, standard definition extras on Blu-ray are not upscaled.

The PS3 also provides three types of noise filters that can be used for DVD playback. The controls for the noise filters can be accessed while playing a DVD by pressing the Triangle button on the BD remote or game controller then highlighting the icon for "AV Setting" and pressing the X button to select. Note these noise reduction filters only work when playing DVDs, not with Blu-ray Discs. The three available video noise filter are:

  • Frame Noise Reduction - Set to reduce fine visual noise
  • Block Noise Reduction - Set to reduce mosaic-like block visual noise displayed on the screen
  • Mosquito Noise Reduction - Set to reduce noise that appears near crisp edges of objects (an MPEG 2 digital artifact)

 

Each of these have available settings of Off, 1, 2 or 3. Using too high a setting can soften the video image, but each may prove useful with dealing with DVDs that exhibit video noise, including digital artifacts.
 

 

 

<<>>

There are four* different "Profiles" for the video+audio capabilties of Blu-ray Disc (BD) players and discs. The earliest BD players were all Profile 1.0 and included the basic features for playback of BDs.

 

 

Profile 1.0 players are no longer being manufactured, but such players can still play movies on BDs, but cannot support some of the enhanced features included on some of the new discs.

Profile 1.1 (also called Bonus View™) players added enhancements for Picture-in-Picture, more internal memory, and support for decoding of a secondary audio channel.

Profile 2.0 (also called Blu-ray Live™) includes additional requirements for high speed internet connectivity for supporting web-enabled interactive features and requires even more internal memory.

Profile 5.0 (also called Blu-ray 3D™) This update to the BD specification was approved in December 2009 and the first stand-alone players are now available. Note that some BD players that support Blu-ray 3D may not support all of the features included with Profile 5.0. The Blu-ray 3D specification defines optional features to support 3-dimension video content. Dual video streams (one for viewing by the right eye and the second for the left eye) will be recorded on 3D discs using the new Multiview Video Coding (MVC) codec, which is an extension to the H.264 Advanced Video Coding (AVC) codec (one of 3 required video codecs for all BD players). All Blu-ray 3D players are required to output the 3D signal in a "Frame Packing" 3D format. Frame Packing essentially places two full resolution HD images into one "super sized" frame for transmission across HDMI. When used for 1080p, the right and left images are placed one above the other into a "super sized" frame that is 2205 pixels vertical by 1920 pixels horizontal with a 45 x 1920 pixel active blanking area separating the two images. More information is HERE) This output signal format is defined in detail within the HDMI 1.4a standard. Viewing movies in 3D from Blu-ray 3D discs will require both a Blu-ray 3D enabled player (e.g., either a stand-alone player or the PS3 with a firmware update) as well as a new 3D enabled HDTV display (e.g., flat panel HDTVs, projectors, etc.). The first 3D enabled BD standalone players and HDTV displays are now available from Panasonic and Samsung and Sony plans to begin sales of their first 3D displays in June 2010. Movies released on Blu-ray 3D discs will be able to be played in standard Blu-ray Disc players, but without the 3D capabilities. Sony has announced a firmware update for the PS3 to enable Blu-ray 3D support (supporting the full resolution Frame Packing 1080p/24 signal format via HDMI) in mid-2010. The recently introduced Sony "3D Ready" Sony stand-alone BD players will also receive a firmware update in mid-2010 to enable their 3D capabilities.

* Profile 3.0 is defined for audio-only Blu-ray Discs.

 

Many of the current BD movie titles, starting with releases in 2008, have included features using Bonus View and/or BD-Live enhancements. The first BD movies based on the new Blu-ray 3D specification are expected to be released by mid-2010.

All current BD players are either Profile 1.1 or Profile 2.0. The Blu-ray Disc profiles are explained in detail HERE. The first BD players supporting the new Blu-ray 3D specification are expected in mid-2010.

What Blu-ray Disc Profile does the PS3 Support?

The PS3 has been upgraded, via firmware updates, since first introduced as a Profile 1.0 player and it now supports BD Profile 2.0 (i.e., supporting both Bonus-View and BD-Live features). Sony also released a firmware update in September 2010 that upgraded the PS3 to support the new Blu-ray 3D specification. However the PS3 does have two limitations related to playback Blu-ray 3D discs as compared to the capabilties of standalone BD players designed "from the ground up" to support Blu-ray 3D. Specifically, when playing Blu-ray 3D discs the PS3 has two limitations as it will not output the lossless surround sound audio formats (i.e., Dolby TrueHD and DTS HD-MA) and the PS3 will not support Java-based animated menus. However, when playing such Blu-ray 3D discs the PS3 will provide the full resolution 3D video along with standard Dolby Digital or DTS surround audio and will provide standard (non-Java) menus.

 

 

The PS3 user settings for music playback can be found under:

 

Settings >>> Music Settings

Audio CD Import AAC 320kbps (The best codec of the ones Sony makes available and at the highest sampling rate)

Set Output Frequency to 44.1 / 88.2 / 176.4 kHz (native format of music plus its multiples)

Bitmapping is a way of enhancing audio

  • Type 1 Use a technique called dithering to reduce noise or distortion produced during audio output.
  • Type 2 Use a technique called noise shaving to reduce noise in the audible range.
  • Type 3 Use a technique developed specifically for the PS3™ system to enhance audio playback.

 

This FAQ recommends Type 3 bitmapping but also listen to the other options to see what you like

 

 

 

Does Sony offer a BD/DVD remote control for the PS3?

While the supplied game controller can be used to control all of the BD/DVD/CD playback functions, many home theater users prefer a more conventional remote control. Sony offers a Bluetooth based remote control that retails for $25.

 

 

 

 

Can I use my Harmony (or other learning universal) remote with the PS3?

Only if you use a IR adapter. The least expensive solution is the Nyko BD remote (sold by amazon.com and others) that includes a simple IR remote and a IR receiver that simply plugs into one of the USB ports on the front of the PS3 console. This solution is limited in that it cannot be used to turn the PS3 power on, but it provides basic disc playback functions (note the Nyko remote can be used to turn off your PS3 by stopping disc playback, then navigating on the XMB to "Users" then selecting "Turn Off System"). The Nyko PS3 remote is now listed in the Harmony data base so you can easily use only the IR-to-USB adapter that is included with the Nyko remote and program your Harmony remote to control BD/DVD playback on you PS3.

 

 

 

 

Nyko Web Site

 

 

 

Logitech's Harmony has released their own solution for controlling the PS3 with an IR-to-Bluetooth adapter. Unlike using an IR-to-USB adapter, the $59.99 (MSRP) Harmony Adapter for PS3 (shown below) supports full remote functionality including powering on the PS3.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another PS3 remote alternative:
http://www.schmartz.com/main.sc

There is also a new generation of more full function remotes for the PS3 that convert IR to Bluetooth, as used by the Sony remotes. Four small companies are now selling such IR-to-Bluetooth remote solutions. The discussion on these is http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1016741.

How do I use the game controller as a remote?

The game controller supplied with the PS3 can be used to control all of the BD/DVD/CD playback functions. The photos below show the remote function associated with each button on the controller.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is it possible to control my PS3 when connected to a Sony HDTV using Sony's Bravia Sync? (Info below provided by AVS Forum member: mdavej) - Added 1/22/2012

It is possible to control a PS3 for media entirely via Bravia Sync, without bluetooth or an IR dongle/converter. Using an IR Sony HDTV remote, you can power on the PS3 with the macro Sync Menu - OK - OK, and power off with Sync Menu - Down - OK- Up - OK. Below are all the the transport commands plus Tools which acts as green triangle, as is used to do a Netflix search. Of course the arrow buttons, menu, display and numbers also work fine over bravia sync. These commands work through most Sony HDTV's with Bravia Sync and any remote that takes JP1 (e.g., One-for-All remotes manufactured by URC) or Pronto hex codes (such as Harmony, URC, or Philips Pronto remotes)

JP1 using TV setup code 0810 or 10810

 

 

 

Cmd EFC5 EFC Protocol Dev Sub OBC
Tools 24876 041 Sony15 151 none 54
BS-Theater 12843 250 Sony15 119 none 96
BS-Rewind 64556 196 Sony15 151 none 27
BS-Pause 65068 198 Sony15 151 none 25
BS-Play 00044 200 Sony15 151 none 26
BS-FF 00812 203 Sony15 151 none 28
BS-Sync Menu 04765 218 Sony15 26 none 88
BS-Prev 58156 171 Sony15 151 none 60
BS-Stop 00556 202 Sony15 151 none 24
BS-Next 57132 167 Sony15 151 none 61

 

 

Pronto Hex

 

Code:
Protocol=Sony15
Device Code: 151 Function: 24 Stop
0000 0068 0000 0010 0060 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 032D
Device Code: 151 Function: 25 Pause
0000 0068 0000 0010 0060 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0315
Device Code: 151 Function: 26 Play
0000 0068 0000 0010 0060 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0315
Device Code: 151 Function: 27 Rewind
0000 0068 0000 0010 0060 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 02FD
Device Code: 151 Function: 28 FFwd
0000 0068 0000 0010 0060 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0315
Device Code: 151 Function: 54 Tools
0000 0068 0000 0010 0060 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 02FD
Device Code: 151 Function: 60 Prev
0000 0068 0000 0010 0060 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 02FD
Device Code: 151 Function: 61 Next
0000 0068 0000 0010 0060 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 02E5
Device Code: 26 Function: 88 Sync Menu
0000 0068 0000 0010 0060 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0345
Device Code: 119 Function: 96 Theater
0000 0068 0000 0010 0060 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0030 0018 0018 0315

 

 

 

 

 

There are multiple methods to connect a PS3 to HDTV and for connecting a PS3 to an Audio/Video Receiver (AVR). If you have a recent vintage HDTV and/or AVR it will probably include one or more HDMI inputs. This is a digital interface that carries video and audio and can support the highest quality video and audio formats provided by the PS3 and available on Blu-ray Discs. Using HDMI is the best choice if you HDTV display and your AVR have HDMI inputs.

Some common equipment configurations are described below. The specific cases considered below range from the simplest case with just a PS3 and a HDTV display to more complex home theater configurations where the PS3 is connected to an input on an AVR and the output of the AVR is connected to a HDTV display. For all cases it is suggested you start with the following PS3 audio and video settings as selected starting from the display showing the PS3's XMB and then using the "Settings" drop-down menu:

 

XMB >>> Settings >>> Display Settings >>>

  • Cross Color Reduction Filter=OFF
  • RGB Full Range (HDMI)=LIMITED
  • Y Pb/Cb Pr/Cr Super-White (HDMI)=ON

 

 

 

XMB >>> Settings >>> Video Settings* >>>

  • Cinema Conversion=AUTOMATIC
  • DVD Wide Mode Display=LETTERBOX
  • Upscale=NORMAL
  • BD/DVD Video Output Format (HDMI)=AUTOMATIC
  • BD 1080P 24Hz Output (HDMI)=AUTOMATIC
  • BD/DVD Dynamic Range Control=OFF)
  • BD/DVD Audio Output Format (HDMI)= ***(see description for cases below)
  • BD Audio Output Format (Optical Digital)=BITSTREAM
* "Video Settings" was called "BD/DVD Settings" with PS3 firmware prior to version 2.50

The Notes for the following Examples Cases are provided immediately following the final example case below.

Case 1: PS3 connected to a new HDTV (that has at least one HDMI input) and using the HDTV’s speakers for the audio (i.e, not using a separate audio system).

This is the simplest case and you only need to use a HDMI cable with male connectors on each end to connect the HDMI output of the PS3 to a HDMI input on your HDTV. You then use your HDTV’s remote control to select the HDMI input that you used and the PS’s video and audio will come through your HDTV.

Suggested PS3 Audio and Video additional Settings for Case 1 (starting from XMB and Settings drop down menu):

  • XMB >>> Settings >>> Display Settings >>> Video Output Settings = HDMI >>> Setting Method=AUTOMATIC
  • XMB >>> Settings >>> Video Settings* >>> BD/DVD Audio Output Format (HDMI)=LINEAR PCM
  • XMB >>> Settings >>> Sound Settings >>> Audio Output Settings >>> HDMI >>> Method for Setting the Output Format=AUTOMATIC

 

Case 2: PS3 connected to an older HDTV that has a DVI input, but no HDMI input, and you are using the HDTV’s speakers for the audio.

When your HDTV has a DVI input (and no HDMI input) you will need to purchase a HDMI-to-DVI cable with a male HDMI connector on one end and a male DVI connector on the other end. You will also need to connect the audio separately since DVI does not carry the audio into the HDTV. For the audio you can simply use an analog stereo cable or if your HDTV accepts an optical digital audio input, you can instead use a, optical digital audio cable (also called a Toslink cable). Note: Alternatively if you already have a extra HDMI-to-HDMI or a DVI-to-DVI cable you could purchase the appropriate HDMI-to-DVI adapter or DVI-to-HDMI adapter to make the connection from the PS3 HDMI output to the HDTV’s DVI input.

Suggested PS3 Audio and Video additional Settings for Case 2 (starting from XMB and Settings drop down menu):

 

  • XMB >>> Settings >>> Display Settings >>> Video Output Settings = HDMI >>> Setting Method=AUTOMATIC
  • XMB >>> Settings >>> Video Settings* >>> BD Audio Output Format (Optical Digital)= **LINEAR PCM (assuming your HDTV is typical and only outputs 2-channel stereo with its built-in speakers or if your HDTV supports surround sound you can select BITSTREAM)
  • XMB >>> Settings >>> Sound Settings >>> Audio Output Settings >>> Select the connector..= select DIGITAL OUTPUT (OPTICAL**) if you are using a optical digital audio connection from the PS3 to your HDTV -or- select AUDIO INPUT CONNECTOR / SCART / AV MULTI if you are using an analog stereo connection from the PS3's Multi-AV connector to you HDTV stereo input

 

 

Case 3: PS3 connected to an older HDTV that has only a Component Video Input for HD video (i.e., no HDMI or DVI input) and you are using the HDTV’s speakers for the audio.

Many older HDTVs have only a component video input for HD video. This is a type of analog connection that uses 3 individual connectors, frequently identified with red, blue and green colored connectors, to carry the HD video signal. The PS3 does not come with a component video cable and if your HDTV requires you to use component video for your HD video input then you will need to purchase one that is specifically intended for use with the PS3. These cables have a “Multi-AV” connector on one end (that plugs into the PS3) and the 3 video connectors and two audio connectors on the other end. Do not confuse this with the Composite Video and Audio connector this is supplied with the PS3 that has red, white and yellow connectors. Composite video is only for standard definition and not HD. Component video is limited to a maximum resolution of 1080i and cannot support the maximum resolution 1080p mode of the PS3. This is just a limitation of your HDTV and be assured the PS3 is still fully compatible with your HDTV. The Multi-AV/Component Video cables sold for use with the PS3 also include 2 cables to carry analog stereo audio to you HDTV. Alternatively if your HDTV accepts an optical digital audio input, you can instead use a optical digital audio cable (also called Toslink cable) to carry the audio from the PS3 to your HDTV.

Suggested PS3 Audio and Video additional Settings for Case 3 (starting from XMB and Settings drop down menu):

 

 

  • XMB >>> Settings >>> Display Settings >>> Video Output Settings = COMPONENT / D-TERMINAL >>> Select All Resolutions Supported by Your HDTV
  • XMB >>> Settings >>> Video Settings* >>> BD Audio Output Format (Optical Digital**)= LINEAR PCM (assuming your HDTV is typical and only outputs 2-channel stereo with its built-in speakers or if your HDTV supports surround sound you can select BITSTREAM)
  • XMB >>> Settings >>> Sound Settings >>> Audio Output Settings >>> Select the connector..= select DIGITAL OUTPUT (OPTICAL**) if you are using a optical digital audio connection from the PS3 to your HDTV -or- select AUDIO INPUT CONNECTOR / SCART / AV MULTI if you are using an analog stereo connection from the PS3's Multi-AV connector to you HDTV stereo input

 

Case 4: PS3 connected to a recent model AVR, with HDMI inputs, and the AVR HDMI output is connected to your recent vintage HDTV.

In this case you can simply use an HDMI cable to connect from the HDMI output on your PS3 to an available HDMI input on your AVR. Then use another HDMI cable to connected the HDMI output of your AVR to an available HDMI input on your HDTV. Your AVR will receive the digital audio data (decoded and provided in multi-channel LPCM format) from the PS3, will process it then output the audio to the connected speakers. The AVR will also pass the digital video data on to your HDTV for display.

Suggested PS3 Audio and Video additional Settings for Case 4 (starting from XMB and Settings drop down menu):

 

  • XMB >>> Settings >>> Display Settings >>> Video Output Settings = HDMI >>> Setting Method=AUTOMATIC
  • XMB >>> Settings >>> Video Settings* >>> BD/DVD Audio Output Format (HDMI)=LINEAR PCM - Note: if you have the "PS3 Slim" model and your AVR supports Dolby TruHD and DTS HD-MA decoding then you can alternatively set the PS3 to output the BD/DVD audio in Bitstream format and let the AVR do the decoding.
  • XMB >>> Settings >>> Sound Settings >>> Audio Output Settings >>> HDMI >>> Method for Setting the Output Format=AUTOMATIC

 

Case 5: PS3 connected to a recent vintage HDTV with HDMI and connected to an older AVR via optical digital audio cable (i.e., Toslink).

In this case you should use an HDMI cable to connect from the HDMI output on your PS3 directly an available HDMI input on your HDTV. Then use an optical digital cable (i.e., Toslink) to connected the PS3 digital audio output to an available optical digital input on your AVR. Your AVR will receive the digital audio data (with the PS3 set to provide bitstream output via it optical digital audio output) from the PS3 via the optical cable. The AVR will decode/process it then output the audio to the connected speakers. The HD video will be sent directly to your HDTV via the HDMI connection. Note that optical digital audio is limited to only carrying the basic Dolby Digital and DTS surround sound formats (essentially as provided with DVD players but in some cases with BD's you will get somewhat higher bit rates) and cannot carry the highest fidelity surround sound formats supported on some Blu-ray Discs. This is a limitation of having an AVR that does not support HDMI inputs, but in this case the PS3 can be configured to still be compatible with your existing equipment.

Suggested PS3 Audio and Video additional Settings for Case 5 if your AVR has decoding for basic Dolby Digital and DTS surround sound** (starting from XMB and Settings drop down menu):

 

  • XMB >>> Settings >>> Display Settings >>> Video Output Settings = HDMI >>> Setting Method=AUTOMATIC
  • XMB >>> Settings >>> Video Settings* >>> BD Audio Output Format (Optical Digital)=BITSTREAM
  • XMB >>> Settings >>> Sound Settings >>> Audio Output Settings >>> Select the connector..= DIGITAL OUTPUT (OPTICAL)**

 

Case 6: PS3 connected to an older HDTV that has only a Component Video Input for HD video (i.e., no HDMI or DVI input) and for the audio the PS3 is connected to an older AVR via optical digital audio cable (i.e., Toslink).

Many older HDTVs have only a component video input for HD video. This is a type of analog connection that uses 3 individual connectors, frequently identified with red, blue and green colored connectors, to carry the HD video signal. The PS3 does not come with a component video cable and if your HDTV requires you to use component video for your HD video input then you will need to purchase one that is specifically intended for use with the PS3. These cables have a “Multi-AV” connector on one end (that plugs into the PS3) and the 3 video connectors and two audio connectors on the other end. Do not confuse this with the Composite Video and Audio connector this is supplied with the PS3 that has red, white and yellow connectors. Composite video is only for standard definition and not HD. Component video is limited to a maximum resolution of 1080i and cannot support the maximum resolution 1080p mode of the PS3. This is just a limitation of your HDTV and be assured the PS3 is still fully compatible with your HDTV. The Multi-AV/Component Video cables sold for use with the PS3 may also include 2 cables to carry analog stereo audio to you HDTV. However in this case you will want to use the PS3's optical digital audio output and using a optical digital audio cable (also called Toslink cable) connect it to the optical digital audio input of your AVR. Note that optical digital audio is limited to only carrying the basic Dolby Digital and DTS surround sound formats (essentially as provided with DVD players but in some cases with BD's you will get somewhat higher bit rates) and cannot carry the highest fidelity surround sound formats supported on some Blu-ray Discs. This is a limitation of having an AVR that does not support HDMI inputs, but in this case the PS3 can be configured to still be compatible with your existing equipment.

Suggested PS3 Audio and Video additional Settings for Case 6 if your AVR has decoding for basic Dolby Digital and DTS surround sound** (starting from XMB and Settings drop down menu):

 

  • XMB >>> Settings >>> Display Settings >>> Video Output Settings = COMPONENT / D-TERMINAL >>> Select All Resolutions Supported by Your HDTV
  • XMB >>> Settings >>> Video Settings* >>> BD Audio Output Format (Optical Digital)=BITSTREAM
  • XMB >>> Settings >>> Sound Settings >>> Audio Output Settings >>> Select the connector..= DIGITAL OUTPUT (OPTICAL)**

_______________________________________________________
NOTES FOR ABOVE EXAMPLE CASES

* "Video Settings" was called "BD/DVD Settings" with PS3 firmware prior to version 2.50
** If you are using the Optical Digital Audio output from the PS3, once it is selected under the menu entries for:
....XMB >>> Sound Settings >>> Audio Output Settings >>> Optical Digital you will then need to add a check mark for each audio format your specific AVR supports. By default "Linear PCM 2 Ch. 44.1 kHz" and "Linear PCM 2 Ch. 48 kHz" are always selected and you must select which additional formats your AVR supports. Most modern AVRs, will support at least "Dolby Digital 5.1 Ch." and most also "DTS 5.1 Ch." Check your AVR owner's manual if in doubt. If you have an older AVR that includes decoding for Dolby Digital but not DTS then you must configure the settings for PS3's Digital Output (Optical) so that DTS is not enabled (i.e., not checked). If the PS3 is configured to not support DTS, then when playing BDs that have only a DTS Surround audio track (in your selected language), the PS3 will decode the DTS audio track and output 2-channel stereo audio in PCM format via the PS3's optical output. In this case you may want to enable Dolby Pro-Logic on your AVR to recover some surround sound information.

 

 

The 3D features of the PS3 can only be enabled once the PS3 is connected to a compatible 3DTV that supports the Frame Packing 3D signal format as defined in the HDMI version 1.4a specification. 3D support is only available via the PS3's HDMI output. Although the PS3's internal HDMI hardware is based on the HDMI version 1.3 specification, firmware updates are able to add software to provide emulation of the essential 3D features as required by the HDMI version 1.4a specification. Any device, such as an Audio/Video Receiver or an HDMI switch, that is used between the PS3 and the 3DTV must be able to support HDMI 1.4 in order to insure all of the 3D video and advanced audio capabilities will be available. You do not necessarily need to replace your existing HDMI cables as most HDMI cables that are certified as HDMI 1.3a (or 1.3b) Category 2 should work. If buying new cables look for ones labeled as HDMI High Speed - they are now available from such sources as monoprice.com.

Blu-ray 3D Support: September 5, 2011 UPDATE:
Sony released firmware version 3.50 in 2010 that enabled Blu-ray 3D playback capability. This allowed the PS3 to be set to output Blu-ray 3D movies that work with the new 3DTVs (i.e., that support Frame Packing 1080p/24 3D format as defined by the HDMI 1.4a and Blu-ray 3D specifications. However, up until firmware version 3.70 was released in August 2011 the PS3, when playing Blu-ray 3D discs and outputting 3D video, was not able to also output any of the lossless audio formats (i.e., only regular Dolby Digital and DTS will be output even if the 3D disc includes Dolby TrueHD and DTS HD-MA audio tracks). The PS3 also could not support the "Blu-ray Disc-Java" enabled features when playing 3D discs. However, firmware version 3.70, added the following capabilities

 

  • 3D playback of Blu-ray Java™ ("BD-J") content is now supported. You can now enjoy BD-J content recorded on Blu-ray 3D™ discs.
  • DTS-HD audio output is now supported while playing Blu-ray 3D™ content*.


3D Game Support: When playing 3D enabled PS3 games, the PS3 can now be set to output 3D video in a format that works with the new 3DTVs (i.e., Frame Packed 720p/60 3D format as defined by the HDMI 1.4a specification for games). See PS3 setup steps below:

Below are the steps to enable 3D support on the PS3:

  • Connect the PS3 via HDMI to a 3D capable TV (i.e., one listed as 3D capable and with an HDMI version 1.4 input, or at least the HDMI 1.4 feature subset required for 3D support)
  • Use the TV's menus to enable the 3D function (not just 2D-to-3D conversion)
  • On the PS3 go to "Settings" then scroll to "Display Settings"
  • Select "Video Output Settings"
  • Highlight "HDMI" scroll right
  • Select "Automatic" scroll right
  • Screen will turn black then come back on
  • Highlight "YES" (Make sure you highlighted "YES") and Select it
  • A dialog should come up indicating your TV supports 3D
  • enter your 3DTV's screen size then scroll right
  • You have completed enabling 3D on the PS3

 

 

 

Firmware version 4.55 is now available (released Feb. 2014)

As background the recent generations of firmware, version 3.00, was released on September 1, 2009 and subsequent updates (some minor) to the 3-series firmware were forthcoming every few months with the final update to the 3-series being version 3.73 which was released in November 2011. Firmware version 4.0 was released in December 2011 and added support for connections with Sony's new Playstaton Vita portable games. Firmware releases that increment the third digit of the version number (e.g. from version 4.40 to 4.41) are considered minor updates (frequently bug fixes) to the previously released major update (e.g., version 4.40 of the firmware in this example). A summary of additions/enhancements included in latest PS3 firmware release, and the download link, can be found HERE (note however that this web site is usually updated a few days after new firmware is released).

PS3 owners with their PS3 console connected to the internet (via either WiFi or Ethernet) can now use the 'System Update' feature under the 'Settings' menu to download and install the latest firmware. An overview of downloading firmware updates for the PS3 is HERE and an overview of the latest firmware update is HERE. It is recommended that owners use the PS3 game controller to operate your PS3 for performing a firmware update. While other remotes (e.g. Sony bluetooth BD remote control) have worked for most of the more recent firmware updates, it appears the PS3 game controller is the only one that is assured to work for every firmware update, so to avoid possible issues with the download and installation it is suggested you use the PS3 game control.

If you don't have your PS3 connected to the internet then you can download the firmware update onto your PC and install the update onto your PS3 using a USB flash memory drive. Note that the USB flash drive must use FAT32 formatting. The instructions and download link are HERE for downloading to a PC. Also some new PS3 Games titles may include the firmware update files - instructions are HERE.

Note that firmware updates first become available for download only for those PS3's that have high speed interent connections and will typically become available a few days later to download to a PC from the above web link.

After you do the update, you might have to re-register your PS3 with your Sony Bluetooth BD/DVD Remote, if you have one (go to the PS3's 'Settings' menu then 'Accessory Setting' and then 'Register BD Remote Control').


IF SOMETHING GOES WRONG WITH YOUR PS3 FIRMWARE UPDATE, there were several new PS3 recovery tools added starting with firmware version 2.5x. A new recovery menu gives users access to several restore tools. Among the recovery tools it provides is the ability to re-install a new firmware update, in the event there is an failure/error during the firmware installation process. However, to re-install the firmware you will need to download the firmware on your PC and transfer it a USB flash memory drive as per the instructions provided above. To access the recovery menu (the following info from boardsus.playstation.com),

 

 

1. Turn off Playstation 3

2. Hold The power button down; The system will turn on and turn off once again.

3. Once the System has been shutdown, re-press your finger on the power button until you hear 2 consecutive beeps.

4. When you hear the 2 beeps take your finger off the power button.

5. You will be prompted to plug in your controller via usb and then press the PS button on the controller

6. The Recovery menu will pop up.

 

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post #3 of 4480 Old 08-21-2008, 07:33 AM
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Reserved -

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post #4 of 4480 Old 08-21-2008, 08:06 AM
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For the streaming part you should add Nero vision and Windows Media Player 11 on the PC. Media player has the extra bonus of being able to stream thumbnail of your video to the PS3 but lack the on the fly transcoding capability of TVersity and Nero. Nero do transcode but the media library refresh function is slow as hell. TVersity, especially the latest version is a really nice program that do transcode, stream YouTube and net radio but I wish it would also stream thumbnail for the video.
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post #5 of 4480 Old 08-21-2008, 08:13 AM
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Whew! That's a tremendous amount of work and I'm sure it will be very much appreciated. Thanks for tackling the challenge. I've proofed the first part and have a few suggested changes:

Corrections:
- (Quick FAQ, turning on/off) Doesn't mention the turning off the PS3 using the XMB
- (Quick FAQ, 40 vs. 80GB) Since the newer 80GB models are showing up in stores worldwide, this should probably be updated to point out that only the 80GB Motorstorm and MGS4 bundles had the extra features
- (Quick FAQ, audio settings) Since the current firmware has separate settings for optical and HDMI this should probably be reworded. Suggestion: "In most cases the default or automatically detected settings for audio and video are optimal. The defaults for Audio Output Format (HDMI) is Linear PCM, and for Audio Output Format (Optical Digital) is Bitstream. These are the recommended settings."
- (Quick FAQ, audio settings) Regarding bistreaming, the mention of of PCM 2-channel is inappropriate as (a) this limit doesn't apply to HDMI and (b) PCM isn't generally considered a bitstreamed format.
- (Quick FAQ, audio settings) The statement regarding audio outputs is misleading. The advanced CODECs are indeed supported over all three connection types (HDMI, analog, and optical) but are downmixed to stereo unless you're using HDMI. Over an optical connection the advanced CODECs will only be decoded if the optical output format is set to PCM.

Minor corrections:
- (Intro) Typo "The old AVS PS3 FAQ thread it ..." should read "The old AVS PS3 FAQ thread is ..."
- (Intro) Typo "... with inputs from ..." should read "... with input from ..."
- (Quick FAQ, turning on/off) Typo, the word button is misspelled as "botton"
- (Quick FAQ, black bars) "... different size rectangles ..." should read "... differently shaped rectangles ..." since aspect ratio has nothing to do with size and this is a point of confusion for some people
- (Quick FAQ, CD play) "... it upconverts them ..." should read "... it can upconvert them ..." since this is an optional feature (and isn't enabled by default, if I remember correctly.)
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post #6 of 4480 Old 08-21-2008, 08:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkAdept View Post

..... I've proofed the first part and have a few suggested changes.....

Thanks for your comments. Most of your corrections have now been included in Post #1 above. As I implied at the top of the thread I still have some more work I plan to do, including correcting typos and adding additional information.

If you have any additional corections please PM them to me.

Thanks -

Ron Jones

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post #7 of 4480 Old 08-22-2008, 10:32 AM
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This is multiple levels of awesomeness. Thanks for putting it together and adding more to it. May I make a suggestion?

In the Tier Threads there was a link to jump down to Tier 1, 2, 3, etc. Because of the length of the first post, it would be beneficial to some users to add links to varying sections. This way, when people come in the FAQ with a question, people can reply "check the first post" and not be met with "I tried but I couldn't find it and I didn't want to read the whole thing." Links to jump down to Audio, Video, Media Streaming, and various other subsections would be useful if you can do that.

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post #8 of 4480 Old 08-22-2008, 11:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkAdept View Post

- (Quick FAQ, CD play) "... it upconverts them ..." should read "... it can upconvert them ..." since this is an optional feature (and isn't enabled by default, if I remember correctly.)

It upconverts and does not give you a choice. The only choices for audio available are 44.1/88.2/176.4 kHz or 48kHz.

I wish they would let you choose since if I use a HDMI switcher, the PS3 leaves it at 44.1 kHz but if I don't use the switcher it goes at 176.4kHz. I want to be able to force 176.4kHz!
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post #9 of 4480 Old 08-22-2008, 08:02 PM
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Excellent Write-up!



Makes me glad I got a PS3... not only for gaming!
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post #10 of 4480 Old 08-22-2008, 08:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bplewis24 View Post

....In the Tier Threads there was a link to jump down to Tier 1, 2, 3, etc. Because of the length of the first post, it would be beneficial to some users to add links to varying sections. ....

Brandon

Thanks - I've added a few jumpto links at the top of Post#1 to jump down to major sections within that post.

Ron

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post #11 of 4480 Old 08-22-2008, 10:14 PM
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Excellent Write-up!



It must be made sticky forthwith! Unbelievable that it's not.

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post #12 of 4480 Old 08-23-2008, 08:56 AM
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I did a search and did not find an immediate answer to my question. I got a PS3 last night and connected it to my Samsung 58" Plasma (FP-T5884) via HDMI. When the video settings were set to automatic, the screen became snowed and the audio crackled. Same thing happened when manually selecting 1080p. Checking the manual setting for 480, 720, and 1080i without the 1080p box checked works just fine, albeit at a slightly lower resolution I imagine.

Does anyone know why the 1080p won't work? I checked through all of the settings on my TV and the PS3 and can't seem to figure it out.

Thanks.
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post #13 of 4480 Old 08-23-2008, 09:02 AM
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Check your HDMI cable. I know PS3 is pretty picky about HDMI 1.3 cable for 1080p.
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post #14 of 4480 Old 08-23-2008, 10:12 AM
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This should be the first step in your troubleshooting.
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post #15 of 4480 Old 08-23-2008, 11:32 AM
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Are you sending 1080p/60 or 1080p/24 to the plasma? Are you sure your plasma accepts either of those as a valid input resolution? Even if your plasma is a 1080p display, not all 1080p displays actually accept 1080p as input. They accept up to 1080i and then de-interlace that internally instead.

If you are sure the plasma will accept 1080p/60 or 1080p/24 (or both) as valid inputs, then the most likely problem is your cable. Some HDMI cable is designed and tested only for use up to normal HDTV bandwidth (1080i/60). Other HDMI cable is designed and tested for 1080p. Same wires, plugs, pinouts and functionality; just better designed and tested.
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post #16 of 4480 Old 08-23-2008, 11:47 AM
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Your Samsung plasma is spec'ed to accept 1080p/60 and 1080p/24 inputs (but it comverts 1080p/24 back to 1080p/60 for display). Thus it should be compatible with the PS3's 1080p output. HDMI does have some compatibility issues, especially between products from different manufacturers. You can try reversing the order in which you turn on the TV and the PS3. If that doesn't solve the problem, you could try replacing the HDMI cable with a new one that is listed as being HDMI 1.3a certified. Inexpensive ones are available from forum sponsor monoprice.com

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post #17 of 4480 Old 08-23-2008, 03:31 PM
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Can someone please help me with instructions on how to set up a wireless internet connection via router with this player?

Thanks.
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post #18 of 4480 Old 08-23-2008, 07:00 PM
 
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I don't believe this player has wireless connectivity..
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post #19 of 4480 Old 08-23-2008, 07:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cortiz View Post

Can someone please help me with instructions on how to set up a wireless internet connection via router with this player?

Thanks.

What is the brand and model number of the wireless router you are currently using? You will need a wireless access point and it would help to know that.
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post #20 of 4480 Old 08-23-2008, 08:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Paul View Post

What is the brand and model number of the wireless router you are currently using? You will need a wireless access point and it would help to know that.


It is a Belkin model # F5D7230-4

According to the Sony S350 manual, it is possible to connect the player wireless....

Thanks.
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post #21 of 4480 Old 08-23-2008, 09:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cortiz View Post

It is a Belkin model # F5D7230-4

According to the Sony S350 manual, it is possible to connect the player wireless....

Thanks.

Interesting. That eliminates one obstacle to my purchasing it.
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post #22 of 4480 Old 08-23-2008, 09:18 PM
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Thanks.

I ordered another monoprice cable (already bought one for my cable box from them earlier this year). I'll take the other one back to Fry's. I'll report back if it indeed solves the issue.
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post #23 of 4480 Old 08-23-2008, 09:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cortiz View Post

It is a Belkin model # F5D7230-4

According to the Sony S350 manual, it is possible to connect the player wireless....

Thanks.

I downloaded the Sony BDP-S350 user manual to check on that and from the illustration I see on page 25 you will need a wireless access point. Based on what you have I would recommend getting a second Belkin router of the same model.
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post #24 of 4480 Old 08-23-2008, 10:16 PM
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It is evident that it does NOT have integrated wireless. There's no reason though that you can't purchase a wifi bridge, which would need to be programmed for your wireless network and then connected to the ethernet port on the player.
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post #25 of 4480 Old 08-24-2008, 06:22 PM
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The S350 connectiion discuss should posted in the S350 owners thread not here since it has nothing to do with the PS3 (other than they are both made my Sony).

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post #26 of 4480 Old 08-24-2008, 06:57 PM
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The thread asking about the S350 and a wireless connection seems to have been merged into this thread by a rather inattentive mod.
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post #27 of 4480 Old 08-24-2008, 07:15 PM
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Here is a cool question..no not really but a question nonetheless. Anyway, I have PS3 set to LPCM with my onkyo 667 (onkyo 606 relabeled). So I am watching "House: MD" in DVD format. I was told by this post (http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...7#post14010437) that Dolby EX format should only come up if it is an available track on the DVD you are watching. And I quote from the link above: "You can select a standard listening mode if and only if you're receiving the associated signal type. For instance, you can only select the TrueHD listening mode if you're receiving a TrueHD signal."
So yes, Dolby EX is coming up as an option in my listening modes, but only when watching House, which leads me to believe the above statements are true; that House is the only DVD i have been watching recently that posseses a DOLBY EX track. So now it all makes sense, right? Umm no...because of this:
I quote from the first post on this threadhttp://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...hp?t=1058533):
"Why doesn't the Dolby TrueHD or DTS HD-Master Audio light on my AVR come on when I'm playing BDs with these lossless audio formats?

...Because the PS3 is doing the decoding itself of these advanced audio formats the AVR is always receiving multichannel Linear Pulse Code Modulation (LPCM) from the PS3 when playing such BDs...The AVR may have an indicator showing that the input is PCM, LPCM, MLPCM, or something similar. The AVR would only activate the Dolby TrueHD or DTS HD-MA light if it were doing the decoding."

MY DEDUCTION: I realize DOLBY EX is not HD source, but it does not matter. The point here is if my PS3 is set to LPCM, my receiver should not be able to recognize it is getting a DOLBY EX signal, yet it does. According to all the information I provided, my receiver should only be able to detect the DOLBY EX if I set the PS3 to bitstream. Alas, something else is happening. Can anybody explain this?
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post #28 of 4480 Old 08-24-2008, 07:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cortiz View Post

Can someone please help me with instructions on how to set up a wireless internet connection via router with this player?

Thanks.





Ummmm yea this is a PS3 thread.
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post #29 of 4480 Old 08-25-2008, 06:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkleafar View Post

Here is a cool question..no not really but a question nonetheless. Anyway, I have PS3 set to LPCM with my onkyo 667 (onkyo 606 relabeled). So I am watching "House: MD" in DVD format. I was told by this post (http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...7#post14010437) that Dolby EX format should only come up if it is an available track on the DVD you are watching. And I quote from the link above: "You can select a standard listening mode if and only if you're receiving the associated signal type. For instance, you can only select the TrueHD listening mode if you're receiving a TrueHD signal."
So yes, Dolby EX is coming up as an option in my listening modes, but only when watching House, which leads me to believe the above statements are true; that House is the only DVD i have been watching recently that posseses a DOLBY EX track. So now it all makes sense, right? Umm no...because of this:
I quote from the first post on this threadhttp://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...hp?t=1058533):
"Why doesn't the Dolby TrueHD or DTS HD-Master Audio light on my AVR come on when I'm playing BDs with these lossless audio formats?

...Because the PS3 is doing the decoding itself of these advanced audio formats the AVR is always receiving multichannel Linear Pulse Code Modulation (LPCM) from the PS3 when playing such BDs...The AVR may have an indicator showing that the input is PCM, LPCM, MLPCM, or something similar. The AVR would only activate the Dolby TrueHD or DTS HD-MA light if it were doing the decoding."

MY DEDUCTION: I realize DOLBY EX is not HD source, but it does not matter. The point here is if my PS3 is set to LPCM, my receiver should not be able to recognize it is getting a DOLBY EX signal, yet it does. According to all the information I provided, my receiver should only be able to detect the DOLBY EX if I set the PS3 to bitstream. Alas, something else is happening. Can anybody explain this?

I don't believe the situation with the BD advanced audio formats has anything to do with the Dolby EX discussion. If appears your Onkyo has the smarts to recognize that the 5.1 LPCM being output from your PS3 includes the matrix rear surround channel information. I don't believe there would be anything within the 5.1 LPCM data to tell the Onkyo that there is a matrix rear surround channel of info, it would have to figure it out for itself. The real question is how does the Onkyo know that it is appropriate to offer the option for applying EX decoding for extracting the rear surround channel from the 5.1 LPCM it is receiving from the PS3. According to the Dolby web site (HERE), although current DD EX software includes an EX flag that can be used to automatically turn on the EX decoding, earlier DD EX DVDs did not include this flag and for those it was up to the AVR to offer for you to manually turn on the EX decoder. This seems to be what your Onkyo AVR is doing with the LPCM from DD EX encoded DVDs.

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post #30 of 4480 Old 08-25-2008, 09:24 AM
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Ron, thanks for the updated FAQ. Do you have control to edit out irrelevant posts? It would be nice to keep the thread relatively clean.

And Mod, this thread should be sticky!
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