Basement (Underpinned) Rec/Media Room Build - Page 5 - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Baselworld is only a few weeks away. Getting the latest news is easy, Click Here for info on how to join the Watchuseek.com newsletter list. Follow our team for updates featuring event coverage, new product unveilings, watch industry news & more!



Forum Jump: 
 1Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #121 of 123 Old 10-25-2015, 10:44 AM
Senior Member
 
just jim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 380
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 63 Post(s)
Liked: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by lpw View Post
Quote: Originally Posted by tpan

+1 for Zoeller --have for my primary. I also have the Zoeller water pressure based backup pump. Saves the trouble of maintaining a battery, which will probably be dead when you need it most. I have not had to call the backup pump into action yet, but during tests of killing power to the primary it performed as advertised.


Is this the backup you have from Zoeller?
http://www.amazon.com/Zoeller-503-00.../dp/B001X5KY6Q

The 2 reviews both mention about it not shutting off properly and that kind of scared me off, which is why I'm leaning towards the battery backup option instead.
I realize that I am late to the party, but for anyone with serious or significant ground water issues, they should consider using a sewage ejection pump instead of a sump pump. They are much faster and generally more durable than sump pumps.

Winterfell theatre build - working title

Last edited by just jim; 10-25-2015 at 10:54 AM.
just jim is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #122 of 123 Old 10-25-2015, 10:52 AM
Senior Member
 
just jim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 380
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 63 Post(s)
Liked: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by lpw View Post
Well, it's been a few weeks since I've updated. The renovation is moving along, but it hit a few snags that have caused some angst and frustration. From my perspective, the contractor has tried a few shortcuts which I guess I should expect, but which makes me very unhappy nonetheless.<br><br>
First, the framing came too far out from the new concrete footing, which comes out 6" from the wall. This is not a large basement so every inch counts. Part of the problem is they framed the wall in front of the new drains instead of flush with it. We quickly got them to re-do it and gained back about 2.5" on either side of the walls in the storage room:<br><br><b>Framing wall in front of drains</b><br><img alt="" src="http://i478.photobucket.com/albums/rr149/highroller54/IMG_3466.jpg" style="border:0px solid;"><br><br><b>Framing re-done</b><br><img alt="" src="http://i478.photobucket.com/albums/rr149/highroller54/IMG_3657.jpg" style="border:0px solid;"><br><br>
The other problem stems from the new footings being done in sections and there are a few bumps sticking out here and there, so in certain sections, the framing looks really far out from the floor! Remembering that we're already losing 6" around the perimeter of the room because of the new concrete footing, losing another inch or so just seemed too much! So the elegant solution my wife came up with was to make a ledge about 32" in height! This will work well because we're going to mount a plasma on the wall and have a projection screen come down just in front of it.<br><br><b>Framing for the ledge</b><br><img alt="" src="http://i478.photobucket.com/albums/rr149/highroller54/IMG_3628.jpg" style="border:0px solid;"><br><img alt="" src="http://i478.photobucket.com/albums/rr149/highroller54/IMG_3656.jpg" style="border:0px solid;"><br><br>
Now this is the part that really upset me. The engineer had spec'ed steel angles to be installed directly into the new footings to help support the wall from buckling in. I know for a fact that both the underpin crew and the contractor felt this was unnecessary and the engineer they usually work with felt the same. Nevertheless, the engineer we hired felt it was necessary and we paid extra to have these steel angles installed.<br><br>
Well, they did a poor/lazy job installing some of the steel angles. Some of them are not even making contact with the wall!<br><br><b>Gap between steel angle and wall</b><br><img alt="" src="http://i478.photobucket.com/albums/rr149/highroller54/IMG_3621.jpg" style="border:0px solid;"><br><br><b>This one is the worst</b><br><img alt="" src="http://i478.photobucket.com/albums/rr149/highroller54/IMG_3620_2.jpg" style="border:0px solid;"><br><br>
What's worst is that the engineer had already caught this a few weeks ago and had asked the contractor to parge (grout) behind the steel angle so that there is contact between the steel angle and the wall. Well, the contractor never told us, and the engineer didn't (still hasn't) write up a report to let me know. And I'm pretty sure the contractor was just going to leave the angles this way and chug along with the framing and drywalling and no one would the wiser!<br><br>
Now, the contractor was away last week on vacation so I won't have a chance until Monday to give him hell and ask him why it wasn't done in the first place. Luckily, we caught it in time and called the contractor on his vacation to call his underpin crew back to parge the angles. The underpin crew came back on Thursday to grout and I can tell he was not happy about having to do it. The engineer also dropped by on Friday to inspect the work and he has now signed off on it. I still feel pissed that the contractor appeared to be ignoring the engineer's instructions and not bothering to tell me about it.<br><br><b>Grouting the steel angles</b><br><img alt="" src="http://i478.photobucket.com/albums/rr149/highroller54/IMG_3627.jpg" style="border:0px solid;"><br><br>
It's one thing to take short cuts, but don't take short cuts with the structural integrity of the house! Maybe I'm overreacting and the steel angles really are overkill, but if the engineer designed for it, then I want them in there and installed properly! I will have to be even more vigilant about the contractor's work from this point on. I hate to say that because, as a homeowner, you want to be able to trust the people working on your home. Otherwise, you might as well be the general contractor yourself if you have to supervise/monitor the work every step of the way.<br><br>
So, that's where we are today. They've done as much of the framing as they can until the contractor is back on Monday. Electrical is starting probably next week. I already know I want a 15 amp dedicated circuit and a 20 amp dedicated circuit for the a/v gear. I'm debating whether to put in a 3rd dedicated circuit for the projector receptacle which will be high on the back wall or on the ceiling. I'll have to get ready to run the speaker and ethernet cables in the ceiling as well as the 40' HDMI cable I bought from Blue Jeans Cable.<br><br><b>How the basement looks now</b><br><img alt="" src="http://i478.photobucket.com/albums/rr149/highroller54/IMG_3655.jpg" style="border:0px solid;"><br><br>
Sigh. I can't wait until this renovation is finished!
Well, they did a poor/lazy job installing some of the steel angles. Some of them are not even making contact with the wall!

Gap between steel angle and wall


I would be equally concerned about the water pipes being so close to the exterior wall! These pipes need to be insulted between the pipe and the block with none on the warm side.

Winterfell theatre build - working title
just jim is offline  
post #123 of 123 Old 10-25-2015, 11:07 AM
Senior Member
 
just jim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 380
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 63 Post(s)
Liked: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by ebox86 View Post
I would love an answer to this water proofing question as well. I would think that the exterior waterproofing would be superior but prohibatively expensive in most cases. The rubber sheathing + french drain are probably the best bet. I just worry about the french drain/sump pump failing.
French drains,when working, are only a buffer to store water while it gets absorbed into the ground. So the storage capacity of the drain must exceed a heavier than normal rain in order to be useful. They do not work well in a heavy clay soil unless you have excavated and used a lot of gravel fill and it is below the level of the basement floor.

What I mean by, "when working", is that the space will gradually fill with dirt and soil washing in from the surroundings.

Winterfell theatre build - working title
just jim is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply General Home Theater & Media/Game Rooms

Tags
basement , excavate , underpin



Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off