Official "Child-Proof Your HT" Thread - AVS | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
Baselworld is only a few weeks away. Getting the latest news is easy, Click Here for info on how to join the Watchuseek.com newsletter list. Follow our team for updates featuring event coverage, new product unveilings, watch industry news & more!


Forum Jump: 
 2Likes
 
Thread Tools
Old 05-24-2010, 10:57 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
thor von clemson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Big Lake, MN
Posts: 63
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 10
For those of us who have children or experience with child-proofing HT, I thought it may be fun or otherwise worthwhile to hear stories or suggestions in one collective thread... how have you child-proofed YOUR HT? What problems might you be having or did you experience? I think it's safe to say that children and home theaters do not mix.

I'll start by saying that my daughter effectively tried to destroy my home. She pulled all the knobs off my Yamaha receiver, chewed my Logitech 550 remote to heck and back, and has (a number of times) smacked the TV screen with her hand or a toy. We've worked with her a lot to teach her what is acceptable, but her brother is right around the corner.

The receiver is OK, as all the knobs have been super glued on. The remote, though still quite functional, looks like it was dragged a mile behind the back of a moving truck, and the tv somehow survived numerous 100-hand-slaps that would be the envy of E.Honda. Thank goodness she stopped doing that. We did not want to mount the tv on the wall.
thor von clemson is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-24-2010, 11:13 AM
AVS Special Member
 
HeyNow^'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Martinsburg, Wv USA
Posts: 2,721
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Teach your kids. Watch your kids. No house, let alone a HT is child proof. My wife never let the kids out of her sight....Now that they are older and on their own, she has passed the eagle eye to the poor dog, he can't even go take a wiz without an escort.
HeyNow^ is offline  
Old 05-24-2010, 11:24 AM
Advanced Member
 
sumavguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: New York
Posts: 679
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Liked: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeyNow^ View Post

Teach your kids. Watch your kids. No house, let alone a HT is child proof. My wife never let the kids out of her sight....Now that they are older and on their own, she has passed the eagle eye to the poor dog, he can't even go take a wiz without an escort.

So by dog, you mean you?

I don't have any kids, but I have a couple of nieces and a nephew, and they have been over once(I just moved so they haven't been able to come over a lot), and have already been planning on how I will childproof the room. It makes it easier as it is my main living area, but with 3 of them it is hard to make sure you have eyes on all of them

Mostly I'm buying doors for the components, my screen rolls up, so the only 2 other things are the TV(which is an older TV, so it's not a HUGE loss if something happens to it, I just don't want to spend the money right now to replace it), and the speakers. Other than the kid gate idea around the speakers, I haven't been able to think of another way to keep them from causing trouble
sumavguy is offline  
Old 05-24-2010, 12:38 PM
AVS Special Member
 
hanesian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Twin Citiesville, MN
Posts: 2,822
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked: 49
Finally - a subject I'm an expert on!

I tried everything, but still my son somehow figures out how to turn everything on my himself when I'm not around to watch him closely. He's very tricky for a 24 year old.

Of course, when the kids were much younger, I found that just not replacing components as they broke them was effective, until eventually we were left with only a barely working 12 year old 24" SD TV. That seemed to consistently keep them away from the equipment.

But for those of you with really young kids and really nice AV equipment, this may be the only reliable solution:


The Un-Theater Un-Build
_________________________________
State Certified Alcohol Disposal Expert.

 

hanesian is offline  
Old 05-24-2010, 01:22 PM
Effortless Actionary
 
Audixium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Rocky Mtn High
Posts: 1,630
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked: 13
In addition to The Hanes Approach, I've found that barking "Don't touch the screen!" any time they get within a couple feet works fairly well.

The Zen Garden HT - Move Along...There is Nothing To See Here.
Audixium is offline  
Old 05-24-2010, 01:26 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Suntan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 7,156
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 49 Post(s)
Liked: 58
All joking aside, as a father of an (almost) 3 yr old and a 4 month old, I can relate.

First, no buttons. All electronic components are hidden behind doors and the doors do not open when the boy is awake. There is one of those child proof lock things on the door to the livingroom equipment, and yes he knows how to open it, but he also knows that he is not allowed in cabinets with the locks on them and so he leaves it alone when the lock is on it.

The Plasma on the wall has a couple of buttons, but they are physically blocked by a table and he gets a firm reprimand when he starts making for those.

All functionality occurs from the remote (universal remote with RF base station inside the cabinet so that everything can be controlled with the doors shut), which is put up and out of reach when it is not used.

Ditto the basement theater, all the electronics (except for the PJ hanging off the ceiling) are in an adjoining room with the door closed. The basement makes use of a Wilsonart DW screen that is about as cleanable of a projection screen as you can get. In addition, the carpeting on the stage is a different color than the rest of the theater (the stage is black) and the standing rule in the house that is made clear to all children that go in the basement is no-one is allowed up on the black carpet. Amazingly, this rule works quite well, even when our friends' children are over. The black stage creates a very good buffer to keep sticky little fingers off speakers and the screen.

Lastly, the most important aspect (and the one that seems to be the hardest for most everyone to implement) is to not allow the children to watch TV until they are at least 2 yrs old. Just keep the electronics off until they go to bed. Not only is it beneficial for them developmentally, but they also have time to develop a sense that the remote/dvd player/tv is not just another toy in their house to destroy.

-Suntan
djearl81 and Neurorad like this.
Suntan is online now  
Old 05-25-2010, 04:28 AM
AVS Special Member
 
HeyNow^'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Martinsburg, Wv USA
Posts: 2,721
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by hanesian View Post

I tried everything, but still my son somehow figures out how to turn everything on my himself when I'm not around to watch him closely. He's very tricky for a 24 year old.

I got one of those big babies too! Same age, where did we go wrong?
HeyNow^ is offline  
Old 05-25-2010, 10:34 AM
Member
 
dgilliga02's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: NW of Chicago, IL
Posts: 89
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntan View Post

Lastly, the most important aspect (and the one that seems to be the hardest for most everyone to implement) is to not allow the children to watch TV until they are at least 2 yrs old.

Uh oh...



FAIL.




Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntan View Post

they also have time to develop a sense that the remote/dvd player/tv is not just another toy in their house to destroy.

Failed, even earlier!!



In all seriousness, I just strapped a baby gate on the front of the AV/TV stand and put the speakers in there too. It sucks and is unsightly, but kids are about sacrifice, right? I also told and told him "no touch" about a million times. Now he pretty rarely touches anything in that area.

So far the only real incident is having to fish a small plastic ball out of the sub port once.

But of course our set-up is very small and L/R surround are in the ceiling.
dgilliga02 is offline  
Old 05-25-2010, 11:19 AM
AVS Special Member
 
ctviggen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,995
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Liked: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntan View Post

Lastly, the most important aspect (and the one that seems to be the hardest for most everyone to implement) is to not allow the children to watch TV until they are at least 2 yrs old. Just keep the electronics off until they go to bed. Not only is it beneficial for them developmentally, but they also have time to develop a sense that the remote/dvd player/tv is not just another toy in their house to destroy.

-Suntan

I don't think a small amount of TV per day is detrimental to a toddler's development. At least it doesn't appear to have been detrimental to our 2.5 yo's development.

In the upstairs room, all the equipment is hidden by a large chair and run via RF remote. All the buttons and lights are hidden. This wasn't done for child proofing purposes, though. It was done for the significant other's purposes. Now, you have to watch the remote. My daughter loves the remote, but will now bring it to us instead of trying to push the buttons.

Bob
ctviggen is offline  
Old 05-25-2010, 11:26 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Suntan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 7,156
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 49 Post(s)
Liked: 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by ctviggen View Post

I don't think a small amount of TV per day is detrimental to a toddler's development. At least it doesn't appear to have been detrimental to our 2.5 yo's development.

Meh, that's what all the books say. At least according to my wife... ...who was the one that read them.

-Suntan
Suntan is online now  
Old 05-25-2010, 11:49 AM
Effortless Actionary
 
Audixium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Rocky Mtn High
Posts: 1,630
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked: 13
It's not the TV itself, it's the content. There is actually decent content written and produced by child developmental psychologists that facilitates cognitive development in little ones. However, most of the stuff that I watched as a young kid (with my older siblings) doesn't fit in that category: Captain Caveman, Speed Racer, Super Friends, Looney Toons, etc.

The Zen Garden HT - Move Along...There is Nothing To See Here.
Audixium is offline  
Old 05-25-2010, 11:57 AM
Member
 
chimpuat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 119
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 11
my daughter is 6, and she's grown up around a variety of electronics, computers in almost every room, and she learned from the very beginning what was acceptable and what was not.

she's been able to master all the remotes (saving up for a harmony) required to turn on the TV, set it to the proper input, turn on the receiver, turn on the satellite, turn on the ps3...she knows everything about my setup, and she's been doing it on her own since before she was 5.

all i did was involve her at a young age in the process and the importance of treating things with respect. she's helped me build and troubleshoot PC hardware since she was old enough to hold a screwdriver, she's sat with me and held the SPL meter before we had an audyssey capable receiver.

the ONLY time i have to say "get away from the TV" is when she's bouncing a balloon around the house. they're like her kryptonite or something, and they make good sense go out the window. other than that, i've never had a problem with her doing anything.

DOG-PROOFING! now that's a thread topic i'd like to see! i could fill a book with HT chaos that has resulted from dogs!

Chimpuat

chimpuat is offline  
Old 05-25-2010, 05:17 PM
Advanced Member
 
Javatime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Cedar Brook, NJ
Posts: 955
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 12
When our 2-1/2 yr old grandson visits, he just loves playing with electric recline buttons on the theater chairs. Next time, I'll put away the mase and taser and follow Hanes' advice and tape him up with duct tape...too funny Hanes.
Javatime is offline  
Old 05-25-2010, 08:46 PM
Advanced Member
 
vespaguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 959
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 18
I'll have to bookmark this thread. My first child is due in one month. From what I've heard, the phase where they continually touch and break things only lasts about 25 years.
vespaguy is offline  
Old 05-26-2010, 05:36 AM
AVS Special Member
 
ctviggen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,995
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Liked: 20
I think there are a few ways to look at this. I'm a big believer in having kids help when they can. I let my daughter "help" me with projects around the house and I'm sure in a little while I'll let her operate the remote. And she has a phenomenal memory (as do all children her age), so she'll take to the remote with no problems.

But any button is a wonderful thing to a child, so if the cabinet of gear is open, there will be buttons pressed when you're not watching. In my family room I'm making over, there will be a huge amount of gear, but the room will be multipurpose. So, it'll be interesting to see how I let my daughter play down there by herself (or with us) while at the same time having a ton of buttons in a single rack, all beckoning to her.

Bob
ctviggen is offline  
Old 05-26-2010, 08:00 AM
AVS Special Member
 
Suntan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 7,156
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 49 Post(s)
Liked: 58
I'd also point out, if you are going to be using a remote around an infant/early toddler, it is helpful to give them their own remote. Not a junky little white and blue fisherprice one that just makes annoying noises, they know that isn't the same as the one you use, but a real one (some old VCR remote or something, preferably one that has a little LED that lights up whenever a button is pressed.) That way, when they want to emulate what they see their parents doing, a parent can redirect away from the remote they are not supposed to touch to their own remote.

A little OT, but this also works for cell phones. If you have an old cell phone that is no longer used on your plan, they would much rather mimic making calls on that than a true toy phone. Just make sure to take the battery out (even if a cell phone is not activated on any plan, it can still make a call to 911, and the minute you think your toddler won't be able to power it on, you'll hear the little boot up sounds coming from it..)

-Suntan
Suntan is online now  
Old 05-26-2010, 10:35 AM
AVS Special Member
 
ctviggen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,995
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Liked: 20
We've given both real remotes and cell phones to our daughter. I didn't leave the batteries in either, though. My wife can also lock her phone, and we've given a locked phone to her.

Bob
ctviggen is offline  
Old 05-26-2010, 10:39 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
thor von clemson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Big Lake, MN
Posts: 63
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 10
[quote=Suntan;18691102]I don't think a small amount of TV per day is detrimental to a toddler's development. At least it doesn't appear to have been detrimental to our 2.5 yo's development. QUOTE]

It's been a while, but I THOUGHT that many types of on-screen images can have an adverse effect on a child's limbic system. These can slow development in many ways. My daughter turns into a drooling vegetable anything the tv comes on; which is ironic because the only thing we let her watch is Veggietales.

Still, as some have pointed out, children can't help but want to press, turn, or otherwise interact with buttons and knobs. My wife and I try to encourage these behaviours so long as the items in question have "Fisher-Price" written on them.
thor von clemson is offline  
Old 05-26-2010, 03:16 PM
AVS Special Member
 
Speedskater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 2,042
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked: 20
If your scheme needs a tester, I have a just turned three year old grandson that can figure anything out. At 2 &1/2 he would clime up the kitchen cabinet draw pulls at his house to get the cookies on the counter.
LL

Kevin
Speedskater is offline  
Old 05-26-2010, 07:37 PM
AVS Club Gold
 
Nathan_R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: The lost underwater city of Atlanta.
Posts: 1,562
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 11
After 9 months of construction and thousands of dollars and hours put into equipment and redecorating, all I ever watch in my theater is Sesame Street and Baby Einstein with my 16 month old son. Argh.

Childproofing has been a task and I'm still figuring it out. My son has his own bricked iphone now, so at least my remote is safe from little teeth. However, I had to remove the rear channels in our 7.1 system as I was terrified he would try to climb them and end up injured. I don't have a stage at this point, but Suntan's "no one allowed on the black carpet" sounds like an awesome approach for several reasons.

PSN: KyFriedNate | XBL: KyFriedNate
My SACD Collection | My DVD-A Collection
Nathan_R is offline  
Old 07-03-2014, 09:03 AM
Senior Member
 
Pianist718's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 421
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 121 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by thor von clemson View Post
For those of us who have children or experience with child-proofing HT, I thought it may be fun or otherwise worthwhile to hear stories or suggestions in one collective thread... how have you child-proofed YOUR HT? What problems might you be having or did you experience? I think it's safe to say that children and home theaters do not mix.

I'll start by saying that my daughter effectively tried to destroy my home. She pulled all the knobs off my Yamaha receiver, chewed my Logitech 550 remote to heck and back, and has (a number of times) smacked the TV screen with her hand or a toy. We've worked with her a lot to teach her what is acceptable, but her brother is right around the corner.

The receiver is OK, as all the knobs have been super glued on. The remote, though still quite functional, looks like it was dragged a mile behind the back of a moving truck, and the tv somehow survived numerous 100-hand-slaps that would be the envy of E.Honda. Thank goodness she stopped doing that. We did not want to mount the tv on the wall.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sumavguy View Post
Quote:Originally Posted by HeyNow^

Teach your kids. Watch your kids. No house, let alone a HT is child proof. My wife never let the kids out of her sight....Now that they are older and on their own, she has passed the eagle eye to the poor dog, he can't even go take a wiz without an escort.


So by dog, you mean you?

I don't have any kids, but I have a couple of nieces and a nephew, and they have been over once(I just moved so they haven't been able to come over a lot), and have already been planning on how I will childproof the room. It makes it easier as it is my main living area, but with 3 of them it is hard to make sure you have eyes on all of them

Mostly I'm buying doors for the components, my screen rolls up, so the only 2 other things are the TV(which is an older TV, so it's not a HUGE loss if something happens to it, I just don't want to spend the money right now to replace it), and the speakers. Other than the kid gate idea around the speakers, I haven't been able to think of another way to keep them from causing trouble
Quote:
Originally Posted by hanesian View Post
Finally - a subject I'm an expert on!

I tried everything, but still my son somehow figures out how to turn everything on my himself when I'm not around to watch him closely. He's very tricky for a 24 year old.

Of course, when the kids were much younger, I found that just not replacing components as they broke them was effective, until eventually we were left with only a barely working 12 year old 24" SD TV. That seemed to consistently keep them away from the equipment.

But for those of you with really young kids and really nice AV equipment, this may be the only reliable solution:

Quote:
Originally Posted by vespaguy View Post
I'll have to bookmark this thread. My first child is due in one month. From what I've heard, the phase where they continually touch and break things only lasts about 25 years.

you guys are hilarious. Very funny.

I like the comments however that suggest getting your kinds involved and not just screaming at them.

Sharp LC-80LE650U 80-inch, Denon AVR 4311ci, Ascend Sierra-1 NrT, Ascend HTM-200 (surrounds), Rythmik F12, WD TV Live Media Player, Samsung BD ES6000, Denon DVD-2910 & Sony BDP-S370 SACD/DVDa, Monster HTS 5100 MKI, Monster Z2 Biwire, Logitech Harmony One, Sennheiser HD600, Schiit Modi/Vali
Pianist718 is offline  
Old 07-03-2014, 10:07 AM
Advanced Member
 
djearl81's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest
Posts: 729
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Liked: 20
Are we discussing protecting the kids or the HT itself?

We have a two year old at our house with another due any day now. Just finished the construction part of the basement. Have all buttons and components up high or in another room. The remote is the only accessible thing. Since it's a touch screen remote....the commands are always out of sync, but it's easily fixed. Outside of that... plug covers, cabinet locks, book shelves screwed to the walls, supervision....the normal child proof stuff

I'm confused too.

djearl81 is offline  
Old 07-07-2014, 07:28 AM
AVS Special Member
 
jayn_j's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 1,374
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 59 Post(s)
Liked: 38
I found that trying to place buttons up high is futile. A three year old will stack as many tables, chairs, boxes necessary to reach and be able to put that Barney DVD into the player.

What I found to be the most effective for kids in the 2-8 yo range was to provide a disposable player in reach and access to the remote. You will be amazed how quickly a 2 YO can pick up on the details of using a remote to get what he wants. If he has 'his' player, he will leave yours alone.
jayn_j is offline  
Old 07-07-2014, 08:25 AM
Senior Member
 
thestoneman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Silver Spring, MD
Posts: 316
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Liked: 37
My solid core door will have a lock on it. Adjacent to the HT, I will have an area designated for the kids so between those 2 basement features I should be fine. Plus, my youngest is almost 6 and she won't paw everything.

I waited a few years to do the HT...partly for this reason. I wish I did it earlier though so I could have watched all those animated movies with them, which they pretty much don't like anymore. I'm hoping the HT will change their perspective on that.

-
My Theater Build

Equipment List: Denon X5200, Epson 6030, 120" Carada cinemascope screen, Panamorph U480, Oppo-103, Emotiva XPA-5, SVS PB12-NSD, LSA Statement LCR & surround speakers, Def Tech ProCinema 1000 rears & front wides, DefTech DI5.5R Atmos overheads, Grafik Eye 3106
thestoneman is offline  
Old 07-08-2014, 11:19 AM
Advanced Member
 
design1stcode2nd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 865
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked: 38
HT has a key lock, components are behind a door and kids are not allowed in the HT without supervision.

I also give the kids friends the "If it's not your seat don't touch it". lecture.

The MacBeth Theater (flood resilient build)
 

Play like a Raven

design1stcode2nd is offline  
Old 07-09-2014, 06:23 AM
AVS Special Member
 
ctviggen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,995
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Liked: 20
I let my 6 year old run the remote for our current system, and she does a pretty good job. Our 3 year old also knows how to select the show she wants to watch. For my next project, I'm going to have the entire system controlled by RF and be behind a closed door. I'll let them run the remote with supervision. If you have standing speakers, watch out for things put in ports, taking off of the driver covers, etc. I have an engineering degree, so I answer their questions honestly and with adult language. If they ask me how the remote works, I tell them the remote emits an IR signal that gets received by an IR receiver and converted to electrical signals interpreted by the HT computer to cause an event to happen that corresponds to the pressed button. My wife, who has a degree in communications, laughs at my explanations. But because they're kids, they have an amazing ability to learn, even if they really don't know what I'm saying.

Since my remotes are so expensive though (I'm using an RF remote that's a few hundred dollars), I would consider getting them their own remotes if I can find suitable ones.

Bob
ctviggen is offline  
Old 04-21-2015, 06:36 AM
Newbie
 
BeSquared's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Mid Atlantic
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 0
I hate to resurrect a necro-thread, but over the weekend I came to the stark realization that I'm going to be looking at a rework of my living room system due to a little one on the way.

I'm hopeful that in the last couple years there's been some new product (ha ha...who am I kidding) that would help me baby-proof, but I think I already know the answer. But it's worth a shot, right?

The TV and components aren't that big of a deal - TV is wall mounted with a console table in front of it. The TiVo and a SurgeX are on the lower level of the console, with an EQ and BluRay player on top. However, I can relocate all of that to the basement if necessary - the cable run isn't that difficult. The problem is with the speakers...

I've had powered Tannoy Ellipse 8s on sand-filled steel stands for years. But let's face it - it's a 33 lb box on top of a stand - probably about as safe as lawn darts. It's survived the 80 lb dog for 8 years (although he's not as nuts as he used to be), but I know a little one is a whole new realm.

So what have you dads out there done to kid-proof things? Diligence in watching the kid is one thing, but I'm starting to think that eliminating the risk altogether might be the best policy, even though it means boxing up (or even selling ) my beloved Tannoys. Maybe it's time to start looking at in-wall solutions.

Yeah, 220, 221, whatever it takes.
BeSquared is offline  
Old 04-21-2015, 06:58 AM
AVS Special Member
 
jayn_j's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 1,374
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 59 Post(s)
Liked: 38
How about a cable loop and wall anchor? Keep it slightly loose so sound doesn't transfer into the wallboard, but tight enough that it would engage before the speaker tipped dangerously far. Better still, use a pair and prevent rotating as well.
jayn_j is offline  
Old 04-21-2015, 07:09 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Frisco, TX
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked: 6
We started all this around the time she got mobile, and finished before she was a year old. We mounted all the TVs on the wall. In our bedroom, the dresser is too high for our almost 3 year old daughter to reach the components. We have a gate preventing her from going upstairs to the game room. The equipment there is in a console, and when she is up there, it stays closed, and she is always supervised as it is the least baby/toddler proofed room. The living room is where we all spend most of our time. The TV is mounted, as is the Sonos. We have a Joey cable box, and cheap Sony BD player. They sit on top and at the back of the console. I moved my gaming systems upstairs so that we could keep just the minimum where she would spend the most time. When my daughter turned one, she loved getting into the console, and while it was mostly empty, the doors had glass, and she kept slamming them shut and trying to climb into the empty shelves. Since her toys kept ending up in the room as well, I took the doors off the console, and we put some canvas bins in the console. Now her toys are in the bins, and they provide some distraction. When she gets older, we can arrange things back to they way they were before.

On a side note, my mother in law has a low console, and the TV is not mounted. When we were there this last weekend, my daughter kept touching the TV screen. I kept reminding her not to touch it, but that did not help. When ever she walked by, she would touch it. It is also not secured to the wall, so I may be mounting another TV in the near future.
wallfly is online now  
Old 04-21-2015, 07:40 AM
Member
 
genofive0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 150
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked: 27
Mine field of oreos gummy bears and new shiny toys between him and the theater.. Oh wait sugar rush if he makes it through. Scratch that
genofive0 is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
 
Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off