Do dark walls matter? Yes…yes they do….. - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 19 Old 11-28-2012, 05:47 PM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
Treozen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Do dark walls matter? Yes…yes they do…..


I recently upgraded the video aspects of my Home Theater to include a 100” screen and projector and in a word, its awesome. My room is a “mostly-dedicated” theater room but it also serves as a sometimes guest bedroom. In my old set up, I had a 60” plasma TV – it was awesome too, but I got the bug to go bigger and lacking $100K for a 100” plasma display, I went projector. Now, I consider myself a mostly-sane audio-visual guy, which means I like a good HT experience, but I’m not about to measure projector lumens using my home built “lumen-o-meter” and calculate the gain of my screen to the 15th decimal. SO…when I read about people painting their theater walls a dark color, I figured that must be one of those things that HT nut-cases do after they’ve read the most recent issue of “I married my Home theater” magazine 20 times and find themselves with nothing better to do.

It wasn’t until I got the projector hooked up that I realized just how much light comes off those white walls of mine. I’d never really taken any notice with the plasma TV and it got me thinking….maybe those HT nutcases have a point? Now, I did buy a cine-gray screen, its not like I didn’t think about reflected light from the walls, etc but I took a picture of the room to try get a sense of just how much light was leaking onto my eggshell-white walls and I was very surprised. Still – the picture on the screen looked excellent, surely dark walls wouldn’t make THAT much difference…right?

Think again. Now there are a few things I hate more than painting… having my “special bits” gnawed off by rabid gophers comes to mind, but generally speaking, I’d sooner drive a number 2 pencil through my cornea than paint something. Yet......I had to know. I decided painting was out of the question – for a start, I need both of my corneas, but 2nd to that, painting would have taken significantly more time that I had to spare and I’d have needed to do the entire room, not just the theater part. I looked at my new Elite screen and the black felt border, and had a flash of inspiration……Instead of paint, I covered the walls in black felt. Yes felt……I went to the fabric store and found a nice very black , non-reflective bolt of felt material – something in the order of 25 yards worth - it cost me $58 (with a handy coupon my wife found) and my wife got to go to the sewing section, so all was well. So me, my staple gun and bolt of felt got going on the walls and ceiling. Getting the fabric flat on the ceiling was tough, but manageable, otherwise it was a pretty quick job. Within a few hours I had covered all the adjacent walls and ceiling in black felt, and it looked pretty good. Still, the true test was to come…

I could already tell that the black walls were controlling reflected light, it was actually much darker in the room even with the light on. I turned out the lights and fired up a movie……..I was blown away by the difference. The picture seemed clearer and more vibrant, but more importantly, you felt sucked into the movie…the entire “feel” was so much better. Even my wife saw the difference immediately, and she’s been generally so-so about the home theater upgrades over the years. The difference between light and dark walls and ceiling cannot be more overstated, I’d put it up there with having a light-controlled room versus one with direct sun – it’s a significant change. Now your experience may be different – I’m sure it depends on the room, the projector, the screen and where you sit relative to all those things, but I take it all back – painting your walls a dark color (or alternatively, stapling felt to them) is a must if you want to get the most out of you home theater setup. Does stapling felt all over my room make my a HT nut-case? ….probably…..but I don’t care, its awesome…and that’s what counts.

As a potential positive side effect – I’ve read that you want to limit the audio bouncing off walls and floors, its obviously better to have the sound come direct from the speaker and not get muddied by echos. Felt certainly isn’t an acoustic dampener panel, but I’d expect it helps a little.
Treozen is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 19 Old 11-29-2012, 05:54 AM
Member
 
AUrator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Neenah, WI
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
you can't post this with no before/after pictures. Cmon man. And welcome to the insanity. pretty soon you will be wanting a nightskymural and asking questions about how to calibrate everything under the sun smile.gif

If you really love your country, you're gonna have to love moonshine
AUrator is offline  
post #3 of 19 Old 11-29-2012, 10:51 AM
AVS Special Member
 
PioManiac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 1,664
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 35

Isn't it Amazing?!! I had the same results/reaction when I did mine too.

 

But it's near impossible to get good pic's of a totally blacked-out bat cave. My camera's flash just gets absorbed by the Black Velvet sponge!

 

http://i1097.photobucket.com/albums/g360/BlackMambaHemi/Basement%20Home%20Theater/BW20b.jpg

 

I have to bring in additional lighting just to snap a decent photo

 

http://i1097.photobucket.com/albums/g360/BlackMambaHemi/Basement%20Home%20Theater/BW20.jpg

 

 

Gotta love the DEEP inky on screen Blacks for better contrast, the absence of any reflections back to the screen makes a huge difference.

Even flat black paint cant come close to the light absorbing properties of dark velvet and fabric, as a result I can barely even make out where a scope image ends and my 120" 16:9 screen begins. No masking required when images can  "POP" off even a low-gain screen. I feel no desire to get a 3D projector now. My 4 year old Epson 1080UB is perfect!

 

prometheus3_zpsc15b790e.jpg

 

 

 

Amazing Video/Audio improvement,

and all I needed was a staple gun and a discount card for Fabric Land. :D

since I have no drywall at all, there are no sound reflections, and my entire room acts as bass trap (velvet over insulation)

which works very well with my three subs (two front 12's and 15" rear near field)

 

I went with a rich deep black velvet on top half of the room, then added just enough textures and accent colors,

that were pulled from the border of the area rugs making the room feel a little warmer with a mix of chocolate browns and dark moss green earth tones

 

Ton's of before/after pics of mine in the link in my sig. but these are my favorite

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dark Moss Green Velvet screen wall...

 


My First Home Theater
...When a Kuro plasma still isnt enough, make your movie Experience Larger than Life with a Projector!
PioManiac is offline  
post #4 of 19 Old 11-29-2012, 12:04 PM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
Treozen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by AUrator View Post

you can't post this with no before/after pictures. Cmon man. And welcome to the insanity. pretty soon you will be wanting a nightskymural and asking questions about how to calibrate everything under the sun smile.gif

Quite right, my bad. Pictures will be coming as soon as I clear away the boxes and packaging from my screen and projector, etc. The room doesn't look to dissimilar from PioManiac's pictures though - minus the fancy speakers and chairs. My speakers would be better referred to as "wired boxes that sometimes produce sound".
Treozen is offline  
post #5 of 19 Old 11-29-2012, 10:57 PM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
Treozen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Ok, here they are.

I want to give two notes:

1) I tired to take the before and after shot at the same angle with the same camera settings - but there wasn't enough light for the camera to do its job after I added the felt. So I tried to make the conditions as close as possible, though the camera took longer to get the shot and as such, the screen image isn't as sharp (I should have paused it) and overexposed - so its actually slightly darker than it appears. The important thing to note though isn't the screen, its the walls and ceiling.

2) If you pick out my miss-matched and sub-standard speakers...yes, I know , I'm already looking at an upgrade....

Its not as fancy as PioManiac's room, but its a start.....




Treozen is offline  
post #6 of 19 Old 12-01-2012, 01:11 PM
Member
 
Gktexas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 16
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
i was planning on painting my media room like a coffee brown color. do you guys think this would have the same effect?
Gktexas is offline  
post #7 of 19 Old 12-01-2012, 05:30 PM
AVS Special Member
 
mn_hokie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 2,522
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gktexas View Post

i was planning on painting my media room like a coffee brown color. do you guys think this would have the same effect?

Black is the best - white is the worst.

Pick where you you're comfortable and go from there. Brown will be more than fine.
mn_hokie is offline  
post #8 of 19 Old 12-01-2012, 07:37 PM
Advanced Member
 
design1stcode2nd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 836
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Liked: 33
Mine is a dark chocolate brown and works fine. the ceiling and soffit are white and you can see a huge difference. The screen wall and ceiling soffits will be black soon.

Although making the entire screen wall black velvet is an idea, don't all the shiny staples show up with the lights on? Or did you make fabric frames like many on here have done? I don't see any seams in the pictures.

The MacBeth Theater (flood resilient build)
 

Play like a Raven

design1stcode2nd is offline  
post #9 of 19 Old 12-01-2012, 11:52 PM - Thread Starter
Newbie
 
Treozen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by design1stcode2nd View Post

Mine is a dark chocolate brown and works fine. the ceiling and soffit are white and you can see a huge difference. The screen wall and ceiling soffits will be black soon.
Although making the entire screen wall black velvet is an idea, don't all the shiny staples show up with the lights on? Or did you make fabric frames like many on here have done? I don't see any seams in the pictures.

The fabric I used was 72 inches wide, so seams were limited on the walls. I basically wrapped the fabric around the room, stapled top and bottom. As to staples, there are a few seams on the projector wall, but you don't see them or the staples. I had planned on taking a sharpie or black flat model paint to the staples, but turns out they are undetectable, so I wont bother. The fabric is also about 2-3 MM thick, so the staples tend to bury themsleves fairly well. If this were a "common" room or someplace more public, the ceiling would need to be changed - but otherwise no staple issues.

As for brown color - I'd expect it to work fine, though I think the more important issue isn't so much the exact dark color, but more-so if its a gloss, semi-gloss or flat paint. You'd want to avoid gloss and semi-gloss I'd expect - likely any dark flat color will work nicely. I think the velvet / fabric works well for 2 reasons. One, its color, but two - reflected light from the screen gets dispersed in the fibers - there just isn't a good surface for light to bounce back off of.
Treozen is offline  
post #10 of 19 Old 12-03-2012, 07:55 AM
Member
 
Gktexas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 16
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by mn_hokie View Post

Black is the best - white is the worst.
Pick where you you're comfortable and go from there. Brown will be more than fine.

Ok yea mine are white right now. What kind of paint is that?? Eggshell or matte? What works best?

Edit: just saw the post above
Gktexas is offline  
post #11 of 19 Old 12-03-2012, 05:57 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
R Harkness's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 11,910
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Liked: 265
Oh yeah, I'm down wit' da thread starter!

I reno'd a living room into a media/home theater room. It had to be cheery enough during the day, but for my obsessive side had to transform to very low reflectance for movie watching. This is why I went with a dark brown felt ceiling structure, dark brown rug and sofa, black velvet screen wall (around the screen)...but light walls for light quality during the day. I have black velvet curtains that quickly pull around the room, making it a complete black box, so right now it's pretty much a bat cave for movie viewing.
The image floats in a sea of black.

Most people think that these steps are only for cutting down light reflection in a projector set up. But as Treozen has discovered, that's only half of it. The overall effect of making it super dark - black if possible - around the image is immense in terms of the overall viewing experience itself. The way it increases the perception of image vividness and how without visual distractions it is a much more immediate, immersive experience. It just sucks you in.
The more visual distraction and visual cues you take away around the image, the more your brain takes it's depth cues from the only thing it sees - the movie image itself - and hence the more window-like and dimensional the image appears. It really gets closer to 3D without the glasses territory.

I discovered this many years ago when I started to surround my plasma with black material to cover a light bookcase to which it was attached. I couldn't believe what surrounding the image with pitch black did to the viewing experience, so I knew when I went projection I would carry this theme even further.

At this time I use a JVC RS55 projector, but I'd started with an old Panasonic AE900 720p projector when my room was bright and un-renovated. Not long ago I threw it back into the system to check some stuff out and was blown away at how amazing the image now looked in the room as it is now. I'd honestly probably choose a lesser projector and a room well treated like this, vs a more expensive projector in a brighter viewing environment.
R Harkness is offline  
post #12 of 19 Old 12-04-2012, 11:47 AM
Advanced Member
 
design1stcode2nd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 836
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Liked: 33
Here is a shot from a year or two ago when I was testing how much of a difference a black soffit/ceiling would help (ceiling and soffit are bright white). I just took some black construction paper and taped it under the soffit on the left. It’s very noticeable on bright scenes, not as much on regular scenes.

avatar_br2.jpg

I’m leaning towards doing at least the screen wall in velvet with black painted ceiling and soffits. I might even go as far as to do the front soffit and 2’ of side walls but we’ll see.

The MacBeth Theater (flood resilient build)
 

Play like a Raven

design1stcode2nd is offline  
post #13 of 19 Old 12-05-2012, 08:45 AM
Member
 
4xoddic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 16
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Hmmmmmm, who bothered to pay attention back in Gen. Science &/or Physics 101?

Light Reflectance Value (LRV) is the total quantity of visible and useable light reflected by a surface in all directions and at all wavelengths when illuminated by a light source.

LRV is a measurement that tells you how much light a color reflects, and conversely how much it absorbs. LRV runs on a scale from 0% to 100%. Zero assumed to be an absolute black and 100% being an assumed perfectly reflective white. An absolute black or perfectly reflecting white does not exist in our everyday terms. Approximately speaking, the average blackest black has a LRV of 5% and the whitest white 85%. Some yellows can measure up into the 80's or 90's as well.


There's a nifty LRV Scale on the above site.

The OP's black felt has an LRV of ~ 5%. I convinced my wife to paint our living room (w/bay window) to match the Kodak Grey card's 18% LRV. That's a gain of 13 over "blackest black." I happened to have a Grey card from Photo I (circa 1976). She took it to the paint store & it took several attempts to match . . . . 18% LRV tends to fool the color analyzer/matcher. She had trepidation as she painted the room, but has warmed to the results: furnishings in the room are truer to original color, as they're not tinged by colors reflected off the walls. The Kuro screen is also not subject to light reflections off a > LRV wall color.

The ceiling is still "white," but any reflections off the Plasma are not visible from the seating positions. The room appears light with the drapes open. Black IT IS NOT.

A little Googling has shown that matching a Kodak Grey card may take a couple of attempts @ the paint counter; but I came across a couple of threads giving specific tint values for brand X paints. We used a flat finish; satin would have a slightly higher LRV (a physics lesson for another day). I believe many paint sample cards likely have the LRV posted. The lowest LRV acceptable to your "decorator" above that of black may = suitable compromise.
4xoddic is offline  
post #14 of 19 Old 12-05-2012, 10:55 AM
AVS Special Member
 
PioManiac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 1,664
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked: 35

Typically a TV doesn't require a bat cave, the top of the screen is usually far enough away from a ceiling, by several feet if you mount the TV to eye level.

and a 4'-5' wide Plasma/LCD panel is usually substantially farther away from any reflective side walls compared to that of a 9' wide projector screen.

It may seem odd, but I actually find watching my Kuro uncomfortable unless there are several lamps on it the room. The screen just seems way too small in a large black space

 

Here's some examples (not mine) of how a lighter colored wall/ceiling can wash out an image and degrade the contrast of a projected image...

 

 

 

 

 

Even a flat black paint will reflect light if it's close enough to the screen, so the light absorbing qualities of Velvet are FAR superior.

 

My room is so dark after wrapping it in Velvet/Fabric that I can even turn on a couple strategically placed lamps without degrading image quality too much.

The light source is at the sides of the screen and there's nothing in the room for it to bounce off to reflect back washing out the image. The velvet sucks it up like a sponge.

 

Low lamp setting on an old bulb, natural mode is bright and vivid with excellent contrast and depth. Looks just like a giant plasma screen.

 

 

 

 

 

50" Pioneer Kuro

 

 

 

 

Same shot with the camera flash turned on...

 

This one from my center seat position, had to recline my chair to get the whole frame in.

 

 

Love the high contrast on this scene too

 

 

 

I did my Black over Brown walls in two large horizontal panels, top row of black velvet hid the lower brown panels staples.

The black velvet was stapled along the top edge only, stretched tight and attached at the lower corners only. No seam, no visible staples.

 

My front screen wall was actually my first, in three vertical panels of a dark moss green velvet.

I placed the first one dead center, then hid the staples with the next panels that had a vertical row of staples from the back side

then the material was folded over the staples to hide them and pulled tight around the corner.

 

 

 

 

http://members.shaw.ca/piomaniac3/1012018.jpg

 

Here's a good shot showing the velvet soaking up light from my projector with the screen half way down and the video being sent to my projector and plasma simultaneously

You can shine a projected image on a grey or even Black painted wall and you can still see it. Not so much on a velvet surface

 

 

 


My First Home Theater
...When a Kuro plasma still isnt enough, make your movie Experience Larger than Life with a Projector!
PioManiac is offline  
post #15 of 19 Old 12-05-2012, 11:55 AM
AVS Addicted Member
 
R Harkness's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 11,910
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Liked: 265

Quite a lot of people seem to think "Well, if I could get a very large sized flat panel TV then I could watch with the lights on and wouldn't have to sit in the dark, treat my room, etc."

The thing for me is that sitting in the dark, in a treated room, is one of the things I LOVE about front projection (and watching movies in general). I find myself much more involved, and the image more compelling, the darker it is and the less visual distraction
there is around the picture. I was even doing that when watching my plasma for years. (The funny thing is guests who had seen plenty of plasmas, or who owned flat panels themselves, thought I had some sort of "special plasma TV" because the image quality
seemed beyond what they saw in other TVs. Whereas it is actually an old "ED" Panasonic model, not even 720p resolution! I simply took note of how to heighten the experience, which involved us watching with lights out and black material behind the plasma making everything else disappear.

So, while I'm intrigued by the idea of affordable huge flat screens in the future (not sure how long I'd have to wait until one is available and practical at 125" wide!), I'm not pining for changing the viewing experience so I can have the lights on.

BTW, I regularly host UFC parties at my place on the big screen. Since I controlled the reflective surfaces in my room, I can easily have the track lights on over the viewing sofa while having a terrific image on the big screen. But despite the ability to do so, even my guests have learned to prefer full lights out, which seems to do the best job of "putting us there" for the fights.
R Harkness is offline  
post #16 of 19 Old 12-05-2012, 02:56 PM
AVS Special Member
 
kjlewie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Marion, Iowa
Posts: 1,006
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked: 23
Good topic. A completely dark room for an immersive movie experience is what I wanted and mostly achieved.

We went through three shades of red paint to get darker sidewalls that were not too dark for my wife. We have flat dark brown ceiling paint, brown furniture and dark brown carpet, the screenwall is covered in AT black speaker fabric, and total light control. With the lights off or low, the screen just floats in front of your eyes. But, sometimes I notice the sidewalls. I think if we had gone with fabric instead of paint, the sidewalls would be less noticeable, even in Antique Red.

R Harkness - the curtain suggestion is a good idea if you have/want lighter colored walls and a bat cave.

Clearly, I'm a man of action - just give me a few minutes to think about it.
Lewis Family Cinema 1.0

Lewis Family Cinema 2.0
kjlewie is offline  
post #17 of 19 Old 12-05-2012, 04:07 PM
AVS Addicted Member
 
R Harkness's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 11,910
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Liked: 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjlewie View Post

R Harkness - the curtain suggestion is a good idea if you have/want lighter colored walls and a bat cave.

Since this is a main floor room that was a living room, I was concerned with aesthetics. I prefered chocolate brown high quality curtains for the curtains that would be visible during the day (stacked to side walls of screen etc). But for absolutely perfect black out,
I prefered the Fidelio Black Velvet for curtains. So I simply ran two curtain tracks in tandem. Short ones for the brown curtains that hang for aesthetics, and behind them the long curtain tracks that span the length of the walls for the black curtains. So the black curtains are completely out of view behind the nicer brown ones when not in use, but pull out and cover every bit of wall for watching movies. It takes literally seconds to turn a "normal looking" room into a bat cave for movies this way and I'm ecstatic with the result. (Guests seem to also appreciate the curtains around the room, as it makes it feel even more cinematic and theater-like.).
R Harkness is offline  
post #18 of 19 Old 12-05-2012, 05:15 PM
Member
 
Rob-Houston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 127
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by R Harkness View Post

Quite a lot of people seem to think "Well, if I could get a very large sized flat panel TV then I could watch with the lights on and wouldn't have to sit in the dark, treat my room, etc."
The thing for me is that sitting in the dark, in a treated room, is one of the things I LOVE about front projection (and watching movies in general). I find myself much more involved, and the image more compelling, the darker it is and the less visual distraction
there is around the picture..

It's NOT a theater if it is not DARK!
Rob-Houston is offline  
post #19 of 19 Old 07-27-2014, 01:54 PM
Member
 
Ebase131's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 80
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by R Harkness View Post
Quote:Originally Posted by kjlewie 

R Harkness - the curtain suggestion is a good idea if you have/want lighter colored walls and a bat cave.


Since this is a main floor room that was a living room, I was concerned with aesthetics. I prefered chocolate brown high quality curtains for the curtains that would be visible during the day (stacked to side walls of screen etc). But for absolutely perfect black out,
I prefered the Fidelio Black Velvet for curtains. So I simply ran two curtain tracks in tandem. Short ones for the brown curtains that hang for aesthetics, and behind them the long curtain tracks that span the length of the walls for the black curtains. So the black curtains are completely out of view behind the nicer brown ones when not in use, but pull out and cover every bit of wall for watching movies. It takes literally seconds to turn a "normal looking" room into a bat cave for movies this way and I'm ecstatic with the result. (Guests seem to also appreciate the curtains around the room, as it makes it feel even more cinematic and theater-like.).
Hey R Harkness,

I took a look at your HT setup and my gosh, that thing makes mine in the works feel ashamed of itself and it's not even done yet! Very amazing job. I hope to be able to build to something like that over time, but it will take time AND a heap of money, and at this point I want to have something serviceable for NFL kickoff this September so I'm trying to make sacrifices where I can just to get it up and running!

Along those lines, my setup is a SONY VPL-HW50ES blasting onto a Jamestown screen (not assembled yet). I plan on blacking out the screen wall with black velvet and also the ceiling in the projector area with the same black velvet (haven't decided which yet, leaning towards the Sy Fabrics Triple Black as it is much cheaper than the Fidelio, but I also want velvet that is flame retardant (is there such a thing? I imagine that also comes at a price =O/).

I also plan on putting up black curtains that can be moved into place for serious movie/sports watching in total darkness. You mentioned you used Fidelio for this, but did you have to make the curtain mechanic yourself or does Fidelio offer their velvet in curtain form?

Thanks for any insight and help on this. Very excited to get this thing up and running!
Ebase131 is offline  
Reply General Home Theater & Media/Game Rooms

User Tag List



Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off