My Basement Project [Now Completed] - AVS Forum
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 02-18-2013, 02:47 AM - Thread Starter
Member
 
LINDW4LL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 57
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
So we are finishing our basement, which will be an office, and this entertainment room. I sketched up a quick floor plan of the entertainment room (see below). It will mostly be used for watching TV (mostly sports and some movies). We are going with a 5.1 setup, using Polk RC85i in-walls for the fronts and rear surrounds, and a Polk 255c-RT center channel. Video will be going through a Samsung UN60ES6500.

Now, the media area is essentially three wall-ed as the rear wall is much further back. The front and left wall are exterior stone walls, the right wall is an interior wall. My question is, how should we go about the insulation? Should we just insulate above and below the speakers, and leave it open behind them? Or just not use insulation at all between the two studs?

Pictures so far, the drywall goes in this week and then it will be coming together. In the floor plan, you can see that there is a line in the middle. There is no wall there as you can see in the photos, but there is an I-Beam support post so that is kind of a divider. There will be a foosball table and some other stuff behind there.


LINDW4LL is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-18-2013, 05:38 AM
AVS Special Member
 
4DHD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: sierra ecuadoriana
Posts: 5,863
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Liked: 74
Well, ideally the in-walls should be in their own back boxes, set into the stud spacings.
But placing 2x pieces forming the top/bottom of the "box" will work, just make sure you seal the framing members to the back.
And you do want insulation in the box. That does two things. First it increases the virtual volume of the box, and provides damping that cuts down resonance frequencies.
4DHD is offline  
Old 02-18-2013, 12:17 PM
Member
 
bepperb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 118
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 15
I'm pretty surprised that you are going to install fiberglass insulation in contact with concrete block. It also doesn't look like you used pressure treated lumber where it contacts the floor. I hope you are at least using a mold resistant drywall.

That being said I think 4dhd's response was perfect.
bepperb is offline  
Old 02-18-2013, 01:00 PM
AVS Special Member
 
4DHD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: sierra ecuadoriana
Posts: 5,863
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Liked: 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by bepperb View Post

I'm pretty surprised that you are going to install fiberglass insulation in contact with concrete block. It also doesn't look like you used pressure treated lumber where it contacts the floor. I hope you are at least using a mold resistant drywall.

The vapor barrier (the white material) between the concrete and the studs takes care of that problem.
4DHD is offline  
Old 02-18-2013, 02:50 PM
Member
 
bepperb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 118
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 15
The vapor barrier between the concrete and the studs takes care of the problem of moisture from the block wicking into the studs and causing mold, and perhaps reduces the relative humidity in the basement. In some climates there is still an issue where warm moist air flows through the fiberglass and condenses on the cold vapor barrier in the wintertime, and when this occurs the moisture is present and mold can occur. That's why you see people either spacing the studs and inch or two from the vapor barrier or using ridgid or spray foam. The former at least doesn't allow the wood/fiberglass contact with the moist surface, the latter two options result in a moisture barrier surface that is above the dew point.

But perhaps this isn't an issue. But in most of the northern US (and similar climates) simply protecting the studs from the moisture of the block is not effective as the plastic surface will get wet with condensation. If this were someone near me (in Wisconsin) I'd recommend moving those walls out, sprayfoam, or some other option. In a warmer or more arid climate this might not be a big deal.
bepperb is offline  
Old 02-18-2013, 10:17 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
LINDW4LL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 57
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Thanks for the responses, guys. I will build boxes. I didn't use pressure treated lumber- this was a (stupid) mistake that I didn't realize until it was too late. Having talked to several builders and researching online, I'm not worried about it.
LINDW4LL is offline  
Old 03-06-2013, 04:48 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
LINDW4LL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 57
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Drywall is up. Needs to be taped, mudded, then paint and carpet. I decided on Sunday that I wanted to put my components in a separate room so I ran another set of speaker wires before the drywallers came over. Had to buy Monster speaker wire from Best Buy as it was a last minute decision :angry:
Speakers come this week and will be picking up the TV this weekend. Also ordered a Harmony One.


tugy2udu.jpg
LINDW4LL is offline  
Old 03-08-2013, 01:11 PM
Member
 
bepperb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 118
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Looking good. The sanding is the worst, but really once that's done and you vacuum up the dust it's just icing from there, painting and flooring seem to go fast because the room starts looking like a real room.
bepperb is offline  
Old 03-08-2013, 03:01 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
LINDW4LL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 57
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Thanks. We're having a friend do the drywall/sanding/mudding which is nice. It does seem like its moving super slowly but it's coming along. But hopefully it will be finished by next weekend.

Also got these delivered yesterday.

base6asa.jpg
u5e6usuv.jpg
LINDW4LL is offline  
Old 03-11-2013, 02:22 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
LINDW4LL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 57
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Mocked up the TV location on the wall. The bottom of the TV will be approximately 30" from the floor. Is this too low? I want to do it this way so the bottom of the TV conceals the outlet, and it will allow me to sneak an in-wall center speaker above the TV.

asutuhub.jpg
LINDW4LL is offline  
Old 03-14-2013, 08:19 AM
Member
 
bepperb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 118
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 15
Ideally your eye level when seated to watch should be about 1/3 the way up the tv, so I actually think your placement is good. If anything for a shared game/movie room I would want it higher so I could see the TV over the couch. It is great whomever did your drywall used the 12' sheets, it looks like they did a very good job (outlet boxes tight, mud consistent... etc... does not look like a homeowner job).
bepperb is offline  
Old 03-14-2013, 01:06 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
LINDW4LL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 57
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Thanks for your help, I just wanted to double check. It does seem kind of low but I think it's just because of the soffit. I'm sure it will look good once it's mounted. I don't think seeing over the couch will be an issue. And yes, they used 12' for the walls and 8' for the ceiling. They did a very nice job and actually just finished about an hour ago. Time for paint!
LINDW4LL is offline  
Old 03-19-2013, 06:33 PM - Thread Starter
Member
 
LINDW4LL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 57
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked: 14
Painted. Carpet and everything else may have to wait until we get back from vacation.

5yru7uny.jpg
y6aparyt.jpg
LINDW4LL is offline  
 
Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off